Genus - Pissodes

Taxonomic Hierarchy for University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum


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5 results for "Pissodes"

Pissodes rotundatus

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Common NameSmall Spruce Weevil SeasonalityIndividuals have been collected from June to August.

Pissodes affinis

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

SeasonalityIndividuals have been collected from early June till mid-September. IdentificationPissodes affinis are dark brown weevils, generally bigger than the other Pissodes spp. Their most distinguishing feature is the intervals on their elytra (wing covers) are of equal width (Stewart and Bright, 1982).

Pissodes fiskei

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

SeasonalityPissodes fiskei are thought to be in flight from May to August (Stewart and Bright, 1982). IdentificationPissodes fiskei are small (approximately 4mm long) and orange-brown colored. The have a long snout with two antennae extending off its snout. It has two round tawny spots on the posterior margin of its elytra (wing covers) with no other spots (Stewart and Bright, 1982).

Pissodes schwarzi

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Common NameYosemite Bark Weevil SeasonalityPissodes schwarzi are known to be in flight in July and August. IdentificationPissodes schwarzi is morphologically very similar to Pissodes strobi (Stewart and Bright, 1982). Pissodes schwarzi are small weevils with white and brown spots covering their body. Two spots on the posterior end of the elytra (wing cover) are usually conspicuous. Generally P. schwarzi are slightly larger and has a darker body colour than P. strobi but these are not good characters to distinguish the two.

Pissodes strobi

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Common NameWhite Pine Weevil SeasonalityAdults overwinter on forest floors and emerge in late April, remaining active until early September (Drouin and Langor, 1991). IdentificationPissodes strobi adults are small (approximately 6mm long) and have long snouts with clubbed antennae attached. Small white and light brown spots pepper their body, with usually two larger spots on the posterior part of their elytra (wing cover).

Taxonomic Hierarchy for University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum