Family - Curculionidae

Taxonomic Hierarchy for University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum


Results

62 results for "Curculionidae"

Ceutorhynchus cochleariae

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Ceutorhynchus consanguineus

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Ceutorhynchus cyanipennis

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Ceutorhynchus decipiens

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Ceutorhynchus erysimi

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Ceutorhynchus fallax

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Ceutorhynchus filirostris

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Ceutorhynchus gallorheanus

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Ceutorhynchus mutabilis

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

SeasonalityProbably one generation per year. Records from Alberta show the species present from April to August. Records from Arizona also show this species present in March. IdentificationAccording to Dietz (1896), adults of this species are oblong-oval, black, and covered in white scales. The scales are grouped into a scutellar spot (grouping of scales at the base of the thorax and elytra) and a fairly distinct sutural line on the dorsal surface. The antennae have seven funicle (antennal segments between the scape and the clubbed) segments. The first and second of these segments being longer than the third and fourth segments combined. The antennal club is elongate and pointed. The beak is long, slender and curved with some scaling near the base. The tarsi are slender with the second and third segments together being longer than the fourth. The fourth tarsal segment projects less than the length of the third segment. The tarsal claws are also toothed. Length 2.5 - 2.8 mm.

Ceutorhynchus neglectus

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

SeasonalityProbably one generation per year. Ceutorhynchus neglectus is common from June to August. IdentificationAdults are small and round bodied (1-2 mm in length) with red-brown legs and dark bodies covered in white scales (Blatchley and Leng 1916). The proboscis is long and curved with small bent antennae at the proximal end. When disturbed, it displays the interesting behavior of folding its legs and proboscis against its body to make it look like a small dark pebble. Similar in appearance to its co-generic C. obstrictus it can be differentiated by its smaller size and dark body color.

Ceutorhynchus obstrictus

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Common NameCabbage seedpod weevil SeasonalityOne generation per year. Ceutorhynchus obstrictus is common from late May to late August. IdentificationAdults have round grey bodies (2-4 mm in length) and grey legs covered with fine white scales. Ceutorhynchus obstrictus has a long curved proboscis with small bent antennae. When disturbed, it displays the interesting behavior of folding its legs and proboscis against its body to make it look like a small grey pebble. Similar in appearance to its co-generic C. neglectus it can be differentiated by its bigger size and grey body color.

Ceutorhynchus querceti

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Ceutorhynchus rapae

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

SeasonalityOne generation per year. Adults emerge from hibernation in April or May (Blatchley & Leng 1916). Newly emerged adults appear in June (Blatchley & Leng 1916) and have been collected into July. IdentificationAccording to Blatchley & Leng (1916), adults are oblong-oval, and black overall with white scales. The dorsal surface is covered in small narrow scales, while the ventral surface is covered with larger wider scales. The funicle (antennal segments between the scape and the clubbed) is seven segmented with the first and second segments being longer than the third and forth together. The beak is slender, cylindrical and about the length of head and thorax combined. The hind femora are toothed. Length 2.7 – 3.2 mm.

Ceutorhynchus sericans

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Ceutorhynchus subpubescens

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

SeasonalityThe overwintering adults emerge in late April to mid May; oviposition occurs from late May into early June; and newly emerged adults appear in July (Dosdall et al. 2007). IdentificationAdults are oblong with a tapering thorax and head. The body color is brownish-black with fine brown scales above and wider gray scales below. The funicle (antennal segments between the scape and the clubbed) is seven segmented with segments one and two being longer than segments three and four united. The beak is slender cylindrical and half the body length. The tarsal claws as well as the hind femora are toothed. Length 3.2 mm. These above details are adapted from LeConte (1876). Final instar larva can be separated from the sympatric C. obstrictus and C. neglectus based on several characters. The head capsule of C. subpubescens is as long as it s wide and has a mean width of 0.64 mm. There are three setae on the dorsal and ventral aspects of the epicranium. Finally, the stipes has five setae while the mala has three ventral and 6 dorsal setae. The above description is adapted from Dosdall et al. (2007).

Cleonidius frontalis

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

SeasonalityAdults active January until November (Anderson 1987). IdentificationAccording to Anderson (1987, Fig. 144c), C. frontalis has denticles on female fore tibia. Irregular patches of larger white scales (not vittate) on elytra (Anderson 1987). Hindwing longer than elytra (Anderson 1987). Prementum of rostrum is ventrally swollen and rostrum cross-section circular (Anderson 1987, Fig. 144b). No curved sulcus (groove) behind the eye (as in C. poricollis) (Anderson 1987). Developed postocular lobes (vs. C. trivitattus) (Anderson 1987).

Cleonidius poricollis

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

SeasonalityAdults active June through November (Anderson 1987). IdentificationDistinct curved sulcus (groove) posterior to the eye, can be obscured by postocular lobe (Anderson 1987, Fig. 150a). Scales on the elytra are sparse and vittate (Anderson 1987). Hindwing less than half elytra length (Anderson 1987).

Cleonidius puberulus

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

SeasonalityAdults active April through October (Anderson 1987). IdentificationRostrum quite broad (Anderson 1987, Fig. 147b). Hind leg tarsi with small hairy pads on the ventral surface (Anderson 1987). Hindwing less than half elytra length (Anderson 1987).

Cleonidius trivittatus

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

SeasonalityAdults active year-round (Anderson 1987). IdentificationAdults are cryptically coloured in black to light tan; lines on the dorsal surface aid in camouflage (Pomerinke et al. 1995). No sexual dimorphism (Pomerinke et al.). Elytra greater than 0.55 times longer than wide (Anderson 1987). Hair like scales on pronotal disc are short and flaccid (Anderson 1987, Fig. 153a).

Cossonus pacificus

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Taxonomic Hierarchy for University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum