Family - Curculionidae

Taxonomic Hierarchy for University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum


Results

62 results for "Curculionidae"

Hylobius congener

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Lepyrus nordenskioeldi canadensis

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Cossonus pacificus

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Magdalis subtincta

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Pissodes rotundatus

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Common NameSmall Spruce Weevil SeasonalityIndividuals have been collected from June to August.

Rhyncolus brunneus

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Ceutorhynchus erysimi

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Ceutorhynchus fallax

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Ceutorhynchus gallorheanus

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Ceutorhynchus filirostris

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Ceutorhynchus rapae

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

SeasonalityOne generation per year. Adults emerge from hibernation in April or May (Blatchley & Leng 1916). Newly emerged adults appear in June (Blatchley & Leng 1916) and have been collected into July. IdentificationAccording to Blatchley & Leng (1916), adults are oblong-oval, and black overall with white scales. The dorsal surface is covered in small narrow scales, while the ventral surface is covered with larger wider scales. The funicle (antennal segments between the scape and the clubbed) is seven segmented with the first and second segments being longer than the third and forth together. The beak is slender, cylindrical and about the length of head and thorax combined. The hind femora are toothed. Length 2.7 – 3.2 mm.

Ceutorhynchus cochleariae

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Omphalapion hookeri

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Ceutorhynchus obstrictus

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Common NameCabbage seedpod weevil SeasonalityOne generation per year. Ceutorhynchus obstrictus is common from late May to late August. IdentificationAdults have round grey bodies (2-4 mm in length) and grey legs covered with fine white scales. Ceutorhynchus obstrictus has a long curved proboscis with small bent antennae. When disturbed, it displays the interesting behavior of folding its legs and proboscis against its body to make it look like a small grey pebble. Similar in appearance to its co-generic C. neglectus it can be differentiated by its bigger size and grey body color.

Ceutorhynchus neglectus

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

SeasonalityProbably one generation per year. Ceutorhynchus neglectus is common from June to August. IdentificationAdults are small and round bodied (1-2 mm in length) with red-brown legs and dark bodies covered in white scales (Blatchley and Leng 1916). The proboscis is long and curved with small bent antennae at the proximal end. When disturbed, it displays the interesting behavior of folding its legs and proboscis against its body to make it look like a small dark pebble. Similar in appearance to its co-generic C. obstrictus it can be differentiated by its smaller size and dark body color.

Ceutorhynchus querceti

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Otiorhynchus rugostriatus

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Common NameRough Strawberry Root Weevil SeasonalityUsually overwinter as larvae, but adults may hibernate in warmer climates (Warner and Negley 1976). IdentificationLarvae are legless, creamy white, curved, and have brown heads (Gov. of Canada). The adult is reddish to brownish black, 6 – 8 mm long, and has hairy elytra (Warner and Negley 1976). The apex of its tibia is rounded (Warner and Negley 1976), it is smaller than O. sulcatus, but larger than O. ovatus, and its femora are not toothed, differentiating it from O. sulcatus and O. ovatu (O'Donnell 1984). The adult's elytra are fused, the weevil is flightless, and has elbowed antennae. Its rostrum is medium in length, shorter than that of O. sulcatus, but longer than that of O. ovatus (Warner and Negley 1976).

Otiorhynchus sulcatus

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Common NameBlack Vine Weevil SeasonalityUsually overwinter as larvae, but adults may hibernate in warmer climates (Warner and Negley 1976). IdentificationEggs are yellowish brown in color and larvae are creamy white with a brown head (Oregon State University Extention). The pupae are also creamy white, and reveal distinct adult parts with separate wing sacs along their backs that eventually fuse (Shearer). Adults are blackish, 9 to 11 mm long, have elbowed antennae slightly widened at the tip, have fused elytra and cannot fly. They have patches of golden scales on their elytra covered with yellow curled hairs (Warner and Negley 1976). The apex of their tibia is rounded, their femora are toothed, and their rostrum is long and widened at the tip (Warner and Negley 1976). Although the weevils are parthenogenetic and there are no males in North America, they do have a spermatheca (Cram 1958). Adults tend to aggregate in large groups due to pheromones and other attractants (Alford et al. 1996). Royal Alberta Museum page

Otiorhynchus ovatus

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Common NameStrawberry Root Weevil SeasonalityOverwinter as larvae, pupae (Cooley 1904), or as adults in warmer climates (Warner and Negley 1976). IdentificationEggs are about .25 mm long, are milky white immediately after oviposition, and eventually turn pale brown (Cooley 1904). The young larvae are microscopic and resemble the large whitish larvae having a yellowish head (Cooley 1904). The soft and delicate pupae are between 5 and 7 mm long, are almost pure white, and reveal distinct adult parts with separate wing sacs along their backs that eventually fuse (Cooley 1904). Immediately after emerging from the pupa, the adult appears light brown, and eventually turns brownish black (Cooley 1904). Adults are 5 to 7 mm long, have elbowed antennae slightly widened at the tip, have fused elytra and cannot fly (Cooley 1904). The apex of their tibia is rounded, their femora are toothed with the first femora having 2 small teeth at the base, and their rostrum is short and stout (Warner and Negley 1976). When adults are disturbed, they pull in their legs and remain immobile (Cooley 1904).

Pissodes affinis

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

SeasonalityIndividuals have been collected from early June till mid-September. IdentificationPissodes affinis are dark brown weevils, generally bigger than the other Pissodes spp. Their most distinguishing feature is the intervals on their elytra (wing covers) are of equal width (Stewart and Bright, 1982).

Taxonomic Hierarchy for University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum