Genus - Buprestis

Taxonomic Hierarchy for University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum


Results

8 results for "Buprestis"

Buprestis sulcicollis

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

SeasonalityInadequate information, expected activity of adults late June through July. IdentificationThe dorsal surface is dull copper to brown or green. The 4 elevated elytral costa are more shining. Elytra and venter lack pale spots. These characters separates B. sulcicollis from all other Alberta species of Buprestis. Adult length is 11 to 15.5 mm.

Buprestis intricata

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

SeasonalityJuly IdentificationThe beetles are often brilliant green to blue with cupreous banding along the elytral suture and lateral margins superficially resembling B. aurulenta. This species differs from B. aurulenta in the presence of closely spaced elytral costae (ridges, 6 or more). Structure of the male genitalia are also diagnostic. The beetles range from 14.4 to 19.4 mm with a mean length of 17.4 mm. (n=7)

Buprestis maculativentris

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

SeasonalityLate June through early August. IdentificationBeetles of B. maculativentris are dark with a bronzed lustre. on the elytra, a slight depression exists 1/4 to 1/2 the distance from the apex. Slight transverse wrinkle marks, occur in the depression. No yellow markings are present on the elytra. The last 4 abdominal sterna are usually maculated with orange spots. This species is easily confused with B. lyrata but may be distinguished by its smaller average size. Immaculate beetles of B. nutalli are very similar, but have lateral maculations on all abdominal sterna. Beetles of B. maculativentris from 13 to 20 mm.

Buprestis confluenta

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

SeasonalityAdults are active from late June through August. IdentificationThis species is perhaps the easiest to identify of any in the genus. The fine yellow specks irregularly scattered over the elytra are not found on any other species. The yellow flecks may be widely separated to almost confluent. The head and pronotum are usually a solid metallic green. the background colour of the elytra is brilliant green through coppery brown and occasionally purplely blue. The beetles range in length from 12 to 20 mm, with males about 14.2 mm and females about 17 mm.

Buprestis langi

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

SeasonalityIn Alberta, adults are known from July 2 through September 3. IdentificationMales tend to be brilliant green, sometimes with coppery over tones, with large yellow paired spots (2, 4 or 6) on their elytra. Females differ in usually lacking spots, or with a pair of small spots on their brilliant green elytra. The beetles are of moderate size with females ranging from 13 to 19 mm. with a mean of 15.5 mm (n=21) and males 14.5 to 15.0 mm (n=2)

Buprestis lyrata

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

SeasonalityJuly IdentificationIn general, these beetles are larger, in Alberta averaging 19.25 mm.(n= 13, 16-23 mm) Beetles are black without dorsal maculations, ventrally the last 1 to 3 abdominal sternites have lateral orange spots. A few immaculate B. nutalli may be confused with this species. Size and presence of maculation on all abdominal sternites will separate the species.

Buprestis nuttalli

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

SeasonalityLate May through mid September. IdentificationMaculated individuals are easily recognised. The dorsal surface is black usually with 4 or 6 orange spots (a few individuals may have 2 or no spots). Ventrally, all abdominal sternites have lateral orange spots. Immaculate individuals may be distinguished from the larger (usually) immaculate B. lyrata by the orange spots on all the sternites. Examination of the male genitalia is also diagnostic. Beetles range from 13 through 18.5 mm with a mean size of 15.4 mm (n=37). males tend to be slightly smaller than the females.

Buprestis adjecta

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

SeasonalityJuly to early September. IdentificationAccurate identification is difficult as the species limits are not clearly understood. Male and female genitalia are diagnostic, except females are more commonly caught. Shape of the elytral apices, as reported in most keys (Helfer 1941, Bright 1987) is used to separate the species, bidentate in B. adjecta and rounded in B. intricata does. Unfortunately this character does not work very well with Alberta collected material. The beetles of B. adjecta tend to be shorter, 14.23 mm, 12.5- 16.0 mm (females, n= 11) than B. intricata. Of the specimens examined, the colour was a solid blue to iridescent green without lateral or sutural coppery regions.

Taxonomic Hierarchy for University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum