Genus - Amara

Taxonomic Hierarchy for University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum


Results

84 results for "Amara"

Amara aenea

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

IdentificationAdult range from 6.2 to 8.8 mm in length (Lindroth, 1968) with males ranging from 7 - 7.5 mm and females 7 - 8.5 mm (Avgine and Emre, 2009). Adult body narrow and flat, black bright upper surface with brassy, greenish or rarely bluish reflection. Eyes are flatter than A. familiaris. Prothorax with front angles protruded, absence of convex surface (fovea) on outer prothorax while inner surface has sharp, short streak parallel to the median line. Elytra with fine striae, each with 3 sub-apical punctures. Male genitals slightly S-shaped at apex (side view) with hooked lateral lobes (parameres) (Lindroth, 1968).

Amara aeneopolita

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Amara alpina

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Amara angustata

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Amara apachensis

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Amara apricaria

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

IdentificationAdults are 6.5 - 9.0 mm in length. Adults are elongate, dark to brown with a faint bronze luster. Antennae, mouth parts and legs are reddish brown in colour. Eyes are convex and large. Prothorax is rounded with truncated anterior margins, sinuated at the base, hind angles denticulate. Elytra parallel-sided at middle with coarsely punctured striations which are notable at the base and flattened at the apex. Males with convex prosternum, hind tibiae bear brush like projections. Male genitalia smaller, convex at the base and straight at the apex, left margin protruded and hooks on lateral lobes rudimentary (Lindroth, 1968).

Amara augustatoides

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Amara aulica

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

IdentificationAdults are stoutly built, 11 - 14.3 mm in length. Remarkably large head. Prothorax is thicker and darker with slight bronze hue and a key to species identification. It is large, hind prothoracic angles are strongly protruding with densely punctate base. Legs and head appendages are reddish brown. In males, meso-tibiae of legs bear two tubercles which are usually one in number in other species. Elytra are short and widen behind middle (Lindroth, 1968).

Amara aurata

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Amara avida

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Amara belfragei

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Amara bifrons

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

IdentificationAdults are 5.3 - 7.4 mm in length, narrow bodied and much paler in color than any other species of the genus Amara. Brown to reddish brown with pale bronze luster. Appendages brownish yellowish and almost transparent. Eyes are convex. Basal half of prothorax is parallel sided with truncated anterior margin, more or less denticulate hind angles. It also has expanded punctuation (having tiny spots, punctures) at the base which is a key character. Prosternum of male is smooth. Elytra are long with shallow striations and with punctuation. Male genitalia smaller, straight and long apex and lateral lobes with hooks (Lindroth, 1968).

Amara blanchardi

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Amara bokori

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Amara browni

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Amara brunnea

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Amara californica

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Amara carinata

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Amara chalcea

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Amara chihuahuae

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Taxonomic Hierarchy for University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum