Order - Hymenoptera

Taxonomic Hierarchy for University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum


Results

276 results for "Hymenoptera"

Fenusa dohrnii

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Common NameEuropean Alder leafminer SeasonalityUnknown in Canada, in Europe and New York state adults are active in mid May (Frankenhuyzen van 1970, Slingerland 1905 cited in Smith 1971). IdentificationAdults: Females only, males not recorded. Small black sawflies approx. 4 mm long. Middle tibia whitish, all tarsi black to whitish but variable. Can be distinguished from Fenusa pumila by length of antennae; are longer than thorax in F. dohrnii (shorter than thorax in F pumila). All sawflies of this group posses an ovipositor modified to be used as a saw to facilitate the deposition of eggs under the surface of leaves. Serrula (teeth) of lancet (saw) low and flat but more obvious than those on the saw of F. pumila. Larvae: Creamy white with a black band on the ventral surface of the thorax, more visible in the later feeding stages. The body is covered in small dark spines and with fewer teeth on the mandibles than Fenusa ulmi or F. pumila. There are 6 instars. The three North American Fenusa species complete development inside leaves of the host plant. Therefore, the larval host is an important diagnostic character. Fenusa dohrnii feeds in Alder, F. pumila on Birch and F. ulmi occurs in eastern North America on Elm. Adapted from Smith 1971.

Fenusa pumila

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Common NameBirch leaf miner SeasonalityIn Alberta late May to early June, mid July to August. Elsewhere continuous from May to late August. IdentificationAdults: Small black sawflies 3.7 mm long. All black except for small amounts of white on each femur, tibia and tarsus. Wings with light brown banding and darker near the body. Antennae shorter than thorax (longer in Fenusa dohrnii). All sawflies of this group posses an ovipositor modified to be used as a saw to facilitate the deposition of eggs under the surface of leaves. Teeth (serula) of the lancet (saw) are low and flattened with 5 or 6 sub-basal teeth (only 3 in F. dohrnii). Males and females generally the same except males without ovipositor. Larvae: Creamy white with distinctive banding pattern on ventral side of thorax and abdomen. Final feeding stage 5.5 mm long. One of only three species in Alberta to feed inside birch leaves. Dorso-ventrally flattened with a prognathous (forward-facing) head. A small black stripe runs from the thorax to the 1st abdominal segment visible on the ventral surface in all instars but more easily distinguished in larger larvae. This stripe consists of four dark brown to black plates in the centre of thoracic segments 1-3 and abdominal segment one. Each plate is separate, but appears to be one contiguous peice. This stripe can be used to distinguish between F. pumila and two other birch leafmining species, Profenusa thomsoni and Heterarthrus nemoratus. In neither P. thomsoni nor H. nemoratus does the stripe continue on to the 1st abdominal segment. In F. pumila the 1st thoracic segment width is constant when viewed from the ventral or dorsal aspect. The three North American Fenusa species complete development inside leaves of the host plant. Therefore, the larval host is an important diagnostic character. Fenusa pumila is widely distributed in North America on Birch, F. dohrnii feeds on Alder and F. ulmi occurs in eastern North America on Elm. Adapted from Smith 1971, Goulet 1992 and Lindquist 1959.

Heterarthrus nemoratus

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Common NameBirch leaf edge miner SeasonalityEarly to mid May until June or July, later at high elevations. IdentificationAdults: Small black sawflies. Females only. 4.5 mm long. Black thorax with yellow pronotum and tegula, white legs but with coxa and basal half of femur black. Forewing with slight brown band. Larvae: Creamy white with distinct brown head capsule about 8 mm long at the last feeding stage. One of only three species in Alberta to feed inside birch leaves. Dorso-ventrally flattened with a prognathous (forward-facing) head. Ventral side of thorax with brown or black banding, only easily visible on 1st segment. This banding can be used to distinguish between two other birch leafmining species, Profenusa thomsoni and Fenusa pusilla in which the bands are larger and more distinct on the 2nd and 3rd thoracic and 1st abdominal segments. The 1st thoracic segment of H. nemoratus larva is wider in the middle than at the union with the head and 2nd thoracic segments when viewed from the ventral or dorsal aspect. The position and character of the larval mine can be occasionally used to identify larvae if found alone in birch leaves. Heterarthrus nemoratus mine near the edge of the leaf forming a blotch shaped mine that rarely reaches the mid-rib. Larval mines appear reddish brown and readily crack and break when handled. When opened, mines are usually free of frass. By comparison, P. thomsoni and F. pusilla tend to mine near the bottom or centre of the leaf, occasionally reaching the edge as later instar larvae and have mines filled with frass. Pupae: Pupation occurs in the leaf, larvae spin a silk cocoon between the upper and lower surface of the leaf within the larval mine. Pupal cells appear lens-like when viewed through the leaf. Heterarthrus nemoratus is the only birch leafmining sawfly to pupate in the leaf. Adapted from Smith 1971, Glasgow 1932, Becker 1938 and Lindquist 1959.

Caliroa cerasi

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Common NamePear slug (official), Cherry slug, Cherry sawfly SeasonalityIn Canada adults emerge and fly in mid-June to late July, elsewhere as early as mid-May. IdentificationAdults: Black sawflies approx. 5.0 mm long. Front and middle tibia brownish. Antenna segment 3 shorter in length than segment 4 + 5. All sawflies of this group posses an ovipositor modified to be used as a saw to facilitate the deposition of eggs under the surface of leaves. Lancet (saw portion of ovipositor) with 17 serrulae (teeth), each long and pointed at apex. Larvae: Small, black and slug-like in appearance, approx. 1.0 mm long at hatch, 11.0 mm long at pupation. Feed on the upper and lower surfaces of leaves. 6 or 7 instars. Dark brown or black head capsule in later instars. Covered with black slime. Pupae: Forms underground within a cocoon constructed of silk and soil. Adapted from descriptions in Smith 1971 and Goulet 1992.

Profenusa thomsoni

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Common NameAmbermarked birch leaf miner, birch leaf miner SeasonalityLate May to July, may continue to emerge late into August IdentificationAdults: Small black sawflies, 4mm long. Females only, males not recorded. Species is likely parthenogenic. Tibia and tarsus white to light yellow, wings brown tinged and darker near the body. Adults may often co-occur with Fenusa pusilla on birch and appear similar but can be distinguished by the ovipositor. Both species posess a saw-like ovipositor used to deposit eggs under the surface of leaves. Profenusa thomsoni's saw is well developed and posses wide, closely spaced serrulae (teeth). Larvae: Creamy white to light brown as the larva ages. Six instars. One of only three species in Alberta to feed inside birch leaves. Dorso-ventrally flattened with a forward facing head except for the final instar where the characteristic eruciform shape is retained and the mouthparts face ventrally. 7.0 mm long in the final (5th ) instar. Medium sized dark brown to black plates on the thorax, visible in all instars but more easily distinguished in larger larvae. These plates can be used to distinguish between P. thomsoni and two other birch leafmining species Fenusa pumila and Heterarthrus nemoratus. In F. pumila the plates appear as a continuous dark black stripe running onto the 1st abdominal segment, while in H. nemoratus a single plate is visible on the 1st thoracic segment only (occasionally with light plates on the 2nd or 3rd thoracic segments). The larval mine of P. thomsoni can be used to separate it from F. pumila. Since P. thomsoni attacks mature leaves, feeding does not disrupt the shape of the leaf whereas F. pusilla attacks expanding leaves and larval feeding tends to result in crinkled leaves. This character is more usefull early in the season second generation F. pumila may attack fully expanded leaves. Adapted from Smith 1971 and Goulet 1992.

Pterocormus devinctor

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

IdentificationMale: 20-23 mm from head to posterior tip of abdomen. Thorax black all over, except for tegula, scutellum, and prepectus (which are orange). Abdomen, antennae and tarsi burnt orange in colour. Head mostly black; frons, clypeus, and mouthparts yellow to orange. Antennae 45-50 segments long, brown at base, orange at tips. Coxae, femurs, and distal portion of tibiae black, trochanters and proximal portion of tibiae orange. No female specimen available for study.

Pterocormus funestus

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

IdentificationMale: 15-20 mm from head to last abdominal segment. Thorax black except for yellow/orange scutellum, tegula, and prepectus. Abdomen with black and yellow/orange on segments 2-5, posterior segments black. Head black with yellow/orange frons, clypeus, and mouthparts. Antennae with approximately 30 segments, mostly dark brown, lightening towards tip. Coxae all black, femur black on top only to entirely black. Tibiae and tarsi yellow/orange on pro and mesolegs, metalegs with dark brown to black tarsi and tibia dark towards proximal portion. Female: 15-20m from head to posterior tip of abdomen. Thorax similar to male, abdomen and scutellum red. Legs similar to male (except for single tibial spur on each proleg).

Pterocormus instabilis

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

IdentificationMale: 12-15 mm from head to posterior tip of abdomen. Thorax entirely black except for scutellum (which is red). Abdomen red-orange with black band on anterior portion of segments 3-5, first two abdominal segments all black. Head all black, except mandibles which can be brownish. Antennae with 35-40 segments, black with white band covering middle portion. Coxae, trochanters, and femurs all black, rest of legs red-orange. Hind tibiae can be black on distal third. No female specimen available for study.

Pterocormus lachrymans

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

IdentificationMale: Thorax black except for scutellum, tegula, and prepectus. 3rd and 4th abdominal segments reddish-orange (darker on top), rest of abdomen black. Head black except for frons, clypeus, and mouthparts. Antennae with appriximately 35 segments, reddish in colour. Pro and metacoxae all black, mesocoxae with black and yellow. Tarsi orange, tibiae orange except for black ends on meta-tibiae. No female specimen available for study.

Pterocormus laetus

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Identification16-20mm long. Male: Thorax black except for tegula, scutellum, and prepectus. Propodeum with bright yellow patch on dorsal surface. Abdominal segments 2-4 have a yellow/orange band covering the posterior half. Head yellow from mandibles to dorsal ocelli, black otherwise. Antennae usually brown with 36 segments. Pro and metacoxae black, mesocoxae mostly yellow. Metafemurs black, other leg segments mostly orange (including tarsi). Female: See genus page for illustration. Thorax similar to male, abdomen red, legs similar to male.

Pterocormus longulus

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

IdentificationMale: 14-17mm from head to posterior tip of abdomen. Less black on thorax than others of this genus. Substantial orange colour present on notum, scutum, tegula, pleurons, scutellum, and propodeum. Abdomen orange with black dorsal patches on abdominal segments 2-6. Head orange. Antennae brown, usually 36 segments. Coxae black and orange, remainder of legs orange (including tarsi). Female: Black on thorax, except for tegula and sctutellum (which are orange). Abdomen mostly red, darker on top. Head black except for brown mouthparts. Coxae, femurs and trochanters black, tibia and tarsi dark red, but hind tibia can have black as well.

Megachile relativa

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Common NameLeafcutter bee SeasonalityEmerge early July to early August (Fye 1965). May to October in southern parts (Mitchell 1962). IdentificationFemales: Relatively small body size with a length of 9-12 mm, stout and completely black body with yellow spurs (articulated spine). Eyes become slightly convergent near the bottom. Soft downy hair (pubescence) is white and is quite dense around the antennae, lower face, cheeks, lateral and posterior thorax, lateral abdomen, and between dorsal abdomen segments. Wings are subhyaline (sub transparent). Large cheeks, only slightly wider than the eyes and mouth mandibles have 5 tooth projections. Pollen collecting “scopa” on the ventral abdomen with dense yellowish short hairs. (Mitchell 1962). Males: Body length of 8-10 mm, stout and completely black body and slightly reddish legs. Eyes become slightly convergent near the bottom. Large cheeks that are slightly wider then the eyes and mouth mandibles have 3 tooth projections. Pubescence are white and very dense around the antennae, lower face, cheeks below, lateral and posterior thorax. Wings are subhyaline (sub transparent). Tergum (dorsal abdomen segment) 7 is prominent, broad, short and has a deep excavation. Sternum (ventral abdomen segment) 5 is short and restricted. Sternum 6 has few setae on each side of the midline with no obvious apical lobe. Genital armatures have slender gonocoxites with a sharp appearing apex. (Mitchell 1962).

Megachile inermis

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Common NameLeafcutter bee SeasonalityJune to September. Nests constructed in July or August (Medler 1958). IdentificationFemales: Body is15-20mm long, stout and completely black body. Soft downy hair (pubescence) is whitish and dense around antennae, sides of face, on top of head and on sides of thorax and thicker blackish hair on dorsal surface of the thorax. Large cheeks (width is twice the size of the eyes) to house muscles used for cutting leaves and mouth mandibles have 5 tooth projections (Mitchell 1962). Deep indentation on each side of the middle bulge of the clypeus (front of head below the antennae and frons and attached to the labrum mouthpart) (Medler & Lussenhop 1968). Wings are subhyaline (sub transparent) with brownish veins. Pollen collecting “scopa” on the ventral abdomen with dense hair and pale yellowish colour (Mitchell 1962). Males: Body is 11-15 mm long, stout and completely black body. Pubescence is very dense and elongated around antennae, lower part of face, lower cheeks, posterior and sides of thorax. Pubescence elongate but less dense on dorsal surface of thorax. Large cheeks (width is twice the size of the eyes) and mouth mandibles have 3 tooth projections. Wings are subhyaline (sub transparent) with brownish veins. Robust and dense setae (bristle like-hair) on the sterna number 5 (ventral abdomen segments) and very dense setae on both sides of the midline of sterna number 6 and spine-like and elongated in the midline. Transverse apical lobe on sterna 6. Genital armatures have robust gonocoxites that are constricted medially and long setae on inner face. (Mitchell 1962).

Megachile perihirta

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Common NameWestern leafcutting bee SeasonalityFlight period mid June - early July, ending late July (Hobbs 1956) - August (Milne & Milne 1980). IdentificationFemales: Identify with caution. Practically undistinguishable from the females of Megachile latimanus Say. Body length is 13-14 mm, stout and completely black with yellowish spurs (articulate hairs). Mouth mandibles have 5 tooth projections. Soft, downy hair (pubescent) is dense and yellow on the lower cheeks, very dense and yellow on lateral and posterior thorax. Abdomen segments are fringed with short whitish hairs. Wings subhyaline (sub transparent) and quite smoky at the apical end. Tergum (dorsal abdomen segment) 6 slightly concave and sternum (ventral abdomen segment) 6 with pollen collecting “scopa” having dense yellowish hairs and scopa is orange in colour. (Mitchell 1962). Males: Similar to M. latimuanus but recognizable by the mid basitarsal (lower segments of legs) protuberance (swelling) being much smaller, narrow and keel-shaped compared to the blunt, robust protuberance of M. latimuanus. Body length is 12-13 mm, stout, black body with front legs yellowish. Large cheeks with concave inferior margin, nearly twice as wide as the eyes and mouth mandibles with 3-tooth projection. Pubescence is yellowish and is dense and elongate around the antennae, lower face, short and thin on the cheeks with a pair of short white hair (looks like lines). Abdomen segments are fringed with short whitish hairs. Long and bright yellow hairs on the scutum (dorsal surface of middle mesothorax segment). Front tarsi (lower segments on legs) are yellow and mid and hind femur (upper leg segment) are quite swollen. Wings are subhyaline (sub transparent) at the base and appear more cloudy at the apex. Genital armatures have robust gonocoxites, which constricts above the base, setae projects towards the apex, dorsal lobe is broad and flat and ventral lobe is curved and slender. (Mitchell 1962).

Megachile whelleri

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Megachile rotundata

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Common NameAlfalfa leafcutter bee SeasonalityEmerge early-late June and adult activity from early June-late September (Stephen & Torchio 1961). IdentificationFemale: Body is 8-9 mm long, robust, black body and legs, brownish circular tegulae (articulate sclerite at base of the costa vein) near base of wing and yellow spurs (articulated spine). Large cheeks slightly narrower than the eyes and mouth mandibles with 4 tooth projections. Soft, downy hair (pubescence) yellowish-white and short on the face and cheeks, more elongate and white on the lower cheeks. Pubescence dense around antennae (more yellowish), sides of face, lateral and posterior thorax (shorter and yellowish) and wing bases (more yellowish). Wings are subhyaline (sub transparent). Tergum (dorsal abdomen segments) 4-6 straight in profile with short suberect hairs and abdomen segments fringed with short yellowish-white hairs. (Mitchell 1962). The scopa (pollen-collected hair basket on ventral abdomen) is silvery gray in colour unlike most other leafcutter bees that have yellow, orange, tan or black scopa (Richards 1984). Males: Body is 7-8mm long, robust, black body, brownish tegulae, front tarsi (lower segments of leg) partly yellowish with yellow spurs. Cheeks considerably narrower than eyes and mouth mandibles with 3 tooth projections. Pubescence is considerably yellow on the face and dense around antennae, lower face region and front of face. Thorax pubescence is whitish, very dense on lateral and posterior surface and both yellowish or whitish on the dorsal surface. Wings are subhyaline and appear smoky near the apex. Sterna (ventral abdomen surface) 1 – 4 are exposed and have punctures and appear yellowish and hyaline with dense elongate white hairs. Sternum 5 is broad, median area has short, fine and dense setae and sternum 6 has an broad short apical lobe, incurved medially. Genital armatures have gonocoxites, which narrow above the base, is compressed, has a curved down apex, tip elongate and narrow, setae projects towards the apex, dorsal lobe is broad and flat and ventral lobe is curved and slender. (Mitchell 1962

Exetastes rufobalteatus

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

SeasonalityMost adults collected mid-June to mid-July, some late May in California (Townes & Townes 1978). IdentificationFemale: Head and thorax black. Antennae brown, darker at base. Coxae black. Front and middle legs brownish, with tibiae and tarsi slightly lighter than femora. Hind legs with femur black, tibia mostly dark brown, tarsi paler. Gaster with first segment (waist) black basally and reddish-brown apically; second, third and fourth segments reddish-brown; remainder of gaster black. Male: Similar to female, but with face (below antennae), mandibles, underside of coxae and underside of front and middle legs yellow. Gaster with apical half of first segment and all of segments 2-5 reddish-brown, remainder black.

Exetastes syriacus

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

SeasonalityMost specimens have been collected from late spring to fall (Townes & Townes 1978). IdentificationHead, thorax and antennae black. Scutellum white in males, reddish in females. Legs and gaster entirely reddish-brown in females. Males are similar except the hind legs have the apical half of the tibia and the basal two tarsal segments dark brown to black, while tarsal segments 3 and 4 are white.

Banchus flavescens

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Exetastes albitarsis crassisculptus

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

SeasonalitySpecimens have been collected from April to July, with most being from May (Townes & Townes 1978). IdentificationHead and antennae black. Thorax almost entirely black, except for reddish-brown mesoscutum and pronotal collar,and yellowish scutellum. Front and middle legs entirely reddish-brown. Hind legs with femur and most of tibia reddish-brown, apex of tibia and first tarsal segment dark-brown to black, tarsi 2-4 white and tarsus 5 light brown. Gaster entirely reddish-brown. This subspecies is distinguishable from E. a. albitarsis by the lack of a white band in the antennae. It is distinguishable from the remaining two subspecies (E. a. concavus and E. a. arizonicus) by the reddish mesoscutum and and mid- and hind-coxae at least partly reddish (Townes & Townes 1978).

Taxonomic Hierarchy for University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum