Superfamily - Ichneumonoidea

Taxonomic Hierarchy for University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum


Results

47 results for "Ichneumonoidea"

Agrypon anale

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Agrypon prismaticum

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Aleiodes malacosomatos

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Apechthis ontario

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Apechthis picticornis

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Aphaereta pallipes

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Astiphromma strenuum

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Banchus canadensis

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Banchus flavescens

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Banchus inermis

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Ceratogastra ornata ornata

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Cremastus incompletus

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Diadegma insulare

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

SeasonalityDiadegma insulare has 5-6 generations per years depending on the generations of host. IdentificationDiadegma insulare is a small wasp not more than 6 mm long with reddish-brown legs and abdomen. Egg is rounded, clear and lack projections. The larva of D. insulare is white segmented and bears a short (1/4 of the total length of the larva) narrow "tail". The female has a well-defined ovipositor. Larva is very active (Sourakov and Mitchell 2000).

Erigorgus curtus

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Erigorgus stenotus

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Exetastes albitarsis albitarsis

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

SeasonalityMost collected in spring/early summer, some as late as September in Edmonton (Townes & Townes 1978). IdentificationAntennae black with a central yellowish-white band (approximately flagellar segments 10-16). Head black. Thorax mostly black, but with mesoscutum and collar mostly reddish-brown and scutellum yellow. All coxae black. Otherwise, front and middle legs entirely reddish-brown. Hind legs with femur, tibia and first tarsal segment dark brown to black, tarsi 2-4 white and tarsus 5 light brown. Gaster with basal three segments reddish-brown, remainder black. This subspecies can generally be distinguished from all other Exetastes albitarsis subspecies by the pale band in the antennae.

Exetastes albitarsis crassisculptus

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

SeasonalitySpecimens have been collected from April to July, with most being from May (Townes & Townes 1978). IdentificationHead and antennae black. Thorax almost entirely black, except for reddish-brown mesoscutum and pronotal collar,and yellowish scutellum. Front and middle legs entirely reddish-brown. Hind legs with femur and most of tibia reddish-brown, apex of tibia and first tarsal segment dark-brown to black, tarsi 2-4 white and tarsus 5 light brown. Gaster entirely reddish-brown. This subspecies is distinguishable from E. a. albitarsis by the lack of a white band in the antennae. It is distinguishable from the remaining two subspecies (E. a. concavus and E. a. arizonicus) by the reddish mesoscutum and and mid- and hind-coxae at least partly reddish (Townes & Townes 1978).

Exetastes fornicator exploratus

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

SeasonalityAdult specimen collections from mid-June to mid-September (Townes & Townes 1978). IdentificationBody almost entirely black, except gaster segments 2 and 3 very dark reddish-brown. Legs reddish-brown, with coxae and trochanters black. Hind legs with apical half of tibia and first tarsal segment dark brown. Exetastes fornicator consists of a chain of subspecies extending across North America, with many intermediate specimens between recognizable subspecies (Townes & Townes 1978). This subspecies can be distinguished from E. f. niger by the lighter coloured hind tibia (approximately half brownish in E. f. exploratus compared to mostly dark brown in E. f. niger).

Exetastes fornicator niger

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

SeasonalitySpecimens have been collected from late June to mid-September (Townes & Townes 1978). IdentificationBody and antennae entirely black. Legs reddish with coxae and trochanters black. Tibia and first tarsal segment of hind legs mostly dark brown. Exestastes fornicator consists of a chain of subspecies extending across North America, with many intermediate specimens between recognizable subspecies (Townes & Townes 1978). This subspecies can be distinguished from E. f. exploratus by the darker coloured hind tibia (approximately half brownish in E. f. exploratus compared to mostly dark brown in E. f. niger).

Exetastes rufobalteatus

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

SeasonalityMost adults collected mid-June to mid-July, some late May in California (Townes & Townes 1978). IdentificationFemale: Head and thorax black. Antennae brown, darker at base. Coxae black. Front and middle legs brownish, with tibiae and tarsi slightly lighter than femora. Hind legs with femur black, tibia mostly dark brown, tarsi paler. Gaster with first segment (waist) black basally and reddish-brown apically; second, third and fourth segments reddish-brown; remainder of gaster black. Male: Similar to female, but with face (below antennae), mandibles, underside of coxae and underside of front and middle legs yellow. Gaster with apical half of first segment and all of segments 2-5 reddish-brown, remainder black.

Taxonomic Hierarchy for University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum