Family - Asilidae

Taxonomic Hierarchy for University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum


Results

9 results for "Asilidae"

Stenopogon obscuriventris

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

SeasonalityAdults found in June. Identification10-15mm in size. Short round thorax with elongated abdomen. No hairs on metapleuron. The abdominal dorsum is completely black , with black humeri. There is also a pile on the first three abdominal segments. It is visible as an evenly grayish species with yellow pile and yellow bristles. Adults of S. obscuriventrus have a hump on the back of their head (gibbosity) which almost reaches the antennal base. The antennae should be uniformly coloured with an orange brown style. On the prothorax, bristles are only on the pronotum. The legs are three quarters black, with a yellow end to the femora and brownish basally and apically black claws. The wings have brownish veins, and in the males a silvery white tinge to the auxillary cell. All posterior wing cells are open, and the anal wing cell is either closed or very narrow. The male genitalia and female ovipositor are both orange brown in colour with a variable number of bristles present. (Adisoemarto, 1967)

Stenopogon coyote

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

SeasonalityAdults first appear late June and early July depending on weather and elevation. They are found well in to August. Identification10-20mm in length. Light brown in colour (as opposed to red or grey). Stout thorax with long, tapered abdomen. Covered with many fine bristles (including metapleuron). Antenna short (1 mm). On the wings, the first posterior cell is narrow at the tip or sometimes closed with a stalk; fourth posterior cell is always closed with stalk; abdomen greenish grey pollinose; first antennal segment brownish orange.

Stenopogon inquinatus

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

SeasonalityAdults have been observed from early June to early September (Cannings 1989). IdentificationLarge (between 15 and 30 mm), heavy bodied, reddish species. There are two forms, one brown, and one more black. The brown form has a grayish yellow pollinose front and vertex. There is a very large gibbosity on the head (a hump). The antennae are either brown black or red black, and the mouthparts are full black. The thoracic colour is black, however it is covered with reddish brown humeri so it appear more brown. There are bristles present on botht the pronotum and episternum, but the metapleuron is bare. The legs are black on the coxae and dorsal sides of the femora, but have a reddish tinge elsewhere. Wings have an open posterior cell, and the anterior crossvein ends either at the middle or slightly before the discal cell. The abdomen is reddish brown on the middle, with black sides and venter. The pile is long on the first two segments, but is shorter on the following abdominal segments. The male genitalia is orange brown with black haris, and the female has lateral pits in the end of the eighth abdominal segment and black spines. The only difference between the brown form and the black form is the colour. The black form has black legs with reddish brown apices and black spines. In both sexes the eight abdominal segment is reddish brown with a black band around it. An intermediate form does exist, with black abdominal sides but a reddish brown narrow back. D. Macaulay image

Stenopogon neglectus

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

SeasonalityAdults collected were found in late July and early August. IdentificationLarge (15-25 mm), elongate, mainly grey species. Though both Stenopogon neglectus and Stenopogon coyote have hairs or bristles on metapleuron, they can be easily distinguished by differences in wing venation. In S. neglectus the wings have first and fourth posterior cells open. The male genitalia are also different: in S. neglectus, the superior forceps and the gonopods ban be reddish brown or black. The abdomen is blackish or less pollinose; and the first antennal segment is blackish. (Adisoemarto 1967)

Laphria gilva

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

SeasonalityAdults are found late July to late August and possibly earlier and later in the southern portion of the range (Schmid 1969). IdentificationMedium to large, 15-20 mm in length. Robust flies with a general black appearance as compared to other Laphria spp. Body is mostly black, with the posterior, dorsal end of the abdomen being orange, finely pubescent (covered by hairs), and slender. Legs are black and raptorial. Laphria gilva can be distinguished by abdominal segments three, four, and five being covered dorsally with orange pubescence, and segment six being black (L. gilva can be confused with L. aimatis (McAtee), but is easily distinguished by this black sixth abdominal segment). Thoracic and leg pubescence is sparse and rather inconspicuous, and the setae of the mask and mystax (setae surrounding the pronounced hypopharynx) are uniformly black, and of medium length compared to other Laphria spp. Superior forceps of the male genitalia are each provided with two lamellar appendages (McAtee 1919; Adisoemarto 1967).

Laphria index

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

SeasonalityAdults are found June through mid August, and possibly earlier in the southern portion of the range. IdentificationMedium sized, 15 mm in length. Laphria index is a generally slender fly compared to other Laphria spp. Thorax and abdomen are covered in fine orange hair (pubescence), and legs are brown to red. Coloration of the abdominal and thoracic piles (clumps of hairs) are similar to L. janus (though less dramatic), with the thoracic pubescence being much more delicate. Legs are covered in fine pubescence, and are long and raptorial, ending in prominent tarsal claws used for subduing prey items and mates. Mystax (dense setae surrounding the hypopharynx) and the surrounding mane are white and rather sparse, and scutellar bristles are yellowish. Metapleural hairs are lightly colored or white. Laphria index can be confused with L. aeatus (Walker), but can be most easily distinguished by the yellow scutellar bristles (McAtee 1919; Adisoemarto 1967).

Laphria janus

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

SeasonalityAdults are found late may through July, and possibly earlier in the southern portion of the range. IdentificationMedium to large, 10-20 mm in length. Laphria janus is a conspicuous bee-mimic which is generally robust, with highly-pubescent raptorial legs and an enlarged hypopharynx used in hunting. The hypopharynx of this species is surrounded by coarse white to yellow setae, referred to as a mystax. Antennae are stout and short, and eyes are large and conspicuous. Moderately course hairs (pubescence) are present and cover the posterior ends of the thorax and abdomen; L. janus is easily distinguished from other Laphria by the abdominal piles being orange and thoracic piles being yellowish. Fine pubescence can continue along the whole of the thorax and abdomen. Males have a slender abdomen, while females have a more rounded abdomen. (McAtee 1919; Adisoemarto 1967).

Laphria sadales

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

SeasonalityAdults are found June through July, and possibly earlier in the southern portion of the range. IdentificationMedium sized; 8-12 mm in length. Body is black and apparently bare (with no significant pubescence), giving a slender appearance. Abdomen is slender and black, and legs are orange to red, except coxae and tarsi which are black. Legs are mostly bare, and are relatively delicate. Compared to most Laphria, which are bee-mimics and large, robust predators, Laphria sadales is one of the less impressive flies of the genus. Antennae are very small, and the setae of the mystax (hairs surrounding the mouthparts) and surrounding mane are relatively short and inconspicuous compared to other species. The hypopharynx is also small relative to other species in the genus Laphria. Sexual dimorphism is slight, with males having slightly paler abdomens and golden abdominal piles (clumps of hairs; compared to black abdominal piles in females). This species is often confused with L. xanthippe (Williston), but can be distinguished by the entirely black abdomen and red legs (McAtee 1919; Adisoemarto 1967).

Laphria vultur

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

SeasonalityAdults have been found from late May to late July. IdentificationMedium-large flies, 20 mm in length. Laphria vultur is robust-looking with a general gold/orange coloration, due to copious amounts of reddish-orange hair (pubescence) covering the entirety of the head, thorax, and abdomen. The pubescence of other species in the genus Laphria is generally less distinct and sparser. Pubescence is most intense on the abdomen and face, with the mystax (hairs surrounding the mouthparts) and mane (surrounding the hypopharynx) slightly lighter in color. Long raptorial legs are covered in moderately thick black and reddish-orange pubescence, with long claws at the end of the tarsi for capturing and subduing prey (McAtee 1919; Adisoemarto 1967)

Taxonomic Hierarchy for University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum