Family - Cerambycidae

Taxonomic Hierarchy for University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum


Results

158 results for "Cerambycidae"

Arhopalus fulminans

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Arhopalus rusticus obsoletus

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

SeasonalityAdult flight period is June through July (Linsley 1962). IdentificationColor brown; head with gula finely rugose; maxillary palpi with last segment triangular (Linsley 1962). Eyes hairy, pronotal surface smoother than A. foveicollis, with shallow depressions, elytra dull with weak ridges (Yanega 1996). Lenth 16-25mm (Linsley 1962). Attracted to u-v lights. There is a possible record of a sub-species, A. rusticus nubilus (LeConte), from Indiana; it is virtually indistinguishable, but slightly darker, with coarser sculpture beneath the head, slightly more projected mandibles, and a lightly more smoothly convex pronotum. The somewhat similar western species A. productus (LeConte), though their ranges do not seem to overlap, is distinctly more elongated and slender (Yanega 1996).

Arhopalus rusticus nubilus

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Arhopalus productus

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Common NameNew House Borer SeasonalityAdults fly in late summer and fall, July to October. IdentificationColor black, surface dull with short pale hairs; antennae with outer segments gradually abbreviated, last 4 segments nearly as long as the preceding segments together; pronotum usually rounded on the sides. Posterior tarsi with third segment cleft for about half its length, the apex of small fourth segment about even with apices of lobes; ocular setae absent or inconspicuous. Form, slender, elongate; pronotum not or little wider than long; gula finely rugulose, not distinctly punctuate, gula not bearded. Little sexual dimorphism; females more robust with antennae attaining nearly the middle of the elytra; females 15-25mm, males 12-23mm. Larvae yellowish white, about 40mm full grown; similar to Asemum striatum but have coarser pronotal asperities and numerous glabrous spots. A slender species, A. productus seems to be most easily distinguished from other species by the narrow pronotum with a longitudinal groove running between the pronotal pits, unabbreviated antennae and cribately punctured elytra (Linsley 1962).

Arhopalus asperatus

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

SeasonalityAdult flight period is from July to October (Linsley 1962). IdentificationRobust, color black to brownish, dull. Head closely and distinctly, but not coarsely, punctuated. Clypeus is large and conspicuous, gula with a beard of dense pale hairs. Femora not clavate, abdoment with sternites very finely, closely punctured and densely clothed in a fine pubescence. Antennae reaching apical 1/3 of elytra with outer segments abruptly abbreviated, last 4 segments at most as long as 2 preceding segments together; pronotum very distinctly wider than long; angulated at sides; posterior tarsi with third segment cleft to middle. Apex distinctly emarginated. Females are slightly more robust than males, antennae reaching basal ΒΌ of elytra; fifth abdominal sternite as long as broad, apex rounded, length 17-31mm, males, 17-29mm (Linsley 1962). Overall, A. asperatus is most defined by the sharply abbreviated last 4 antennal segments, distinct asperites on the pronotum, and angular shape of the pits on the pronotum (Linsley 1962).

Arhopalus foveicollis

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

SeasonalityAdult flight period is June though August (Yanega 1996). IdentificationBody robust, dark brown to blackish, dull. Head closely punctuate, antennae to apical 1/3 of elytra, with segments 8-11 as long as the preceding 3 together. Gula with a dense beard of long pale hairs, pronotum distinctly wider than long, sides usually rounded, rarely angular. Abdomen with 5th sternite truncate or feebly emarginated at apex. Females more robust than males, abdomen with 5th sternite rounded at the apex (Linsley 1962). Eyes not hairy, pronotal surface irregular with a pair of deep pits; elytra with distinct ridges. The range extends westward to overlap with that of a similar species A. asparatus (LeConte), which is possibly only a variant of A. foveicollis (Yanega 1996; Linsley 1962). Overall, A. foveicollis is most defined by their nicely rounded pair of pronotal pits, rounded pronotal profile and gradually abbreviated antennal segments.

Asemum striatum

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Spondylis upiformis

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Trachysida mutabilis

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Meriellum proteus

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Tetropium parvulum

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Rhagium inquisitor

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Pachyta lamed liturata

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Xylotrechus undulatus

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Pogonocherus penicillatus

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Phymatodes dimidiatus

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Acmaeops proteus proteus

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Acanthocinus pusillus

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Grammoptera subargentata

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Stenocorus obtusus

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

SeasonalityAdults common from May to August (Gardiner 1970; Linsley and Chemsak 1972). IdentificationLength 10-17 mm (Linsley and Chemsak 1972). The head is narrowed posteriorly and rounded laterally (Leng 1890). The eyes are small, convex, and finely granulated (Casey 1913). The third and fifth antennal segments are equal in length; the fourth antennal segment is two thirds as long as third and fifth (Casey 1913). The eleventh antennal segment is longer than the tenth (Linsley and Chemsak 1972). A very fine pubescence covers the body (Leng 1890); the head is fuscous, and the posterior body is testaceous in color (Casey 1913). The elytra are narrowed and rounded at the tip, the sutural angle is obtuse (Casey 1913). The prothorax is shorter than it is wide; it surface convex; constricted anteriorly and posteriorly and bisinuate laterally (Casey 1913). The lateral protuberance is not well developed and the lateral tubercles are obtusely rounded (Casey 1913). S. obtusus are very sexually dichromatic (Linsley and Chemsak 1972). Males may be all black or pale with black appendages and vittate elytra. Females have a uniformly yellowish elytra and reddish appendages and prothorax (Linsley and Chemsak 1972). However dichromatic characteristics are not universal, few male specimens have been identified with unicolorous elytra and few female specimens have been identified with vittate elytra (Hopping 1937). S. obtusus can be distinguished from similar species by the small, convex eyes (Leng 1890); evenly rounded elytral apices (Linsley and Chemsak 1972), and the lateral edges of pronotum having obtusely rounded tubercles (Linsley and Chemsak 1972).

Taxonomic Hierarchy for University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum