Species - Laphria janus

Taxonomic Hierarchy for University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum


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Laphria janus

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

SeasonalityAdults are found late may through July, and possibly earlier in the southern portion of the range. IdentificationMedium to large, 10-20 mm in length. Laphria janus is a conspicuous bee-mimic which is generally robust, with highly-pubescent raptorial legs and an enlarged hypopharynx used in hunting. The hypopharynx of this species is surrounded by coarse white to yellow setae, referred to as a mystax. Antennae are stout and short, and eyes are large and conspicuous. Moderately course hairs (pubescence) are present and cover the posterior ends of the thorax and abdomen; L. janus is easily distinguished from other Laphria by the abdominal piles being orange and thoracic piles being yellowish. Fine pubescence can continue along the whole of the thorax and abdomen. Males have a slender abdomen, while females have a more rounded abdomen. (McAtee 1919; Adisoemarto 1967).

Taxonomic Hierarchy for University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum