Kingdom - Animalia

Taxonomic Hierarchy for University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum


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9,869 results for "Animalia"

Abacidus hamiltoni

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Abagrotis alampeta

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Abagrotis alternata

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

SeasonalityAdults have been collected in Alberta in August. IdentificationA relatively large Abagrotis (3.8-4.3 cm wingspan). The forewings of males are dark red-brown, while those of females are usually lighter orange-brown. The markings consist of faint, doubled antemedian and postmedian lines, and a small oval orbicular and an elongate vertical reniform, both finely outlined in pale yellow-brown scales and at least partially filled with grey scales. The terminal area is usually paler and sharply defined from the remainder of the wing. The hindwings are dull brown-black with orange-brown fringe. The large size, dark red or orange-brown color and relatively complete pattern will separate alternata from the other Alberta species of Abagrotis. See also Abagrotis placida and cupida.

Abagrotis anchocelioides

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Abagrotis apposita

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Abagrotis baueri

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Abagrotis bimarginalis

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Abagrotis brunneipennis

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

IdentificationA medium-size (3.3-3.7 cm wingspan) moth with brick-red forewings and black hindwings. The forewings vary in color in the same population from dull brown with rather prominent dark orbicular and reniform to deep brick red with black basal and subterminal bands (illustrated). The banded form of brunneipennis is unmistakable. Most brunneipennis have a deeper more saturated almost greasy-looking appearance. The markings on most specimens are faint or obsolete, with the dark shade at the top of the subterminal shade most prominent. They are very closely related and most likely to be confused with A. cupida, most specimens of which are lighter orange-red and have lighter black hindwings. Brunneipennis is associated with sandy habitats in the cooler boreal forest and foothills regions, while cupida frequents dry often clay habitats south of the boreal forests. Although bar-code sequence fails to differentiate between cupida and brunneipennis, there are significant differences in both the male and female genitalia. Lafontaine (1998) illustrates the various forms of adults and genitalia of both sexes.

Abagrotis crumbi

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Abagrotis cupida

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

IdentificationA medium-size (3.3-3.5 cm wingspan) moth with orange-brown or less commonly grey-brown or brown forewings, and dull black hindwings with light red-brown fringe. The small dark orbicular and more prominent dark reniform usually stands out against the ground. The lines, and in particular the antemedian and postmedian lines are doubled and indicated by an incomplete series of dark scales. The terminal area is the same color but lighter than the rest of the wing, and is usually separated from the rest of the wing by a dark shade or line. Some specimens are speckled with darker scales, especially on the basal half. Antennae simple. Sexes are alike except that females (as illustrated) have a wide, flattened abdomen. Similar to reddish forms of placida, but lacking the median shade crossing the forewing in placida, and with different genitalia. Specimens of trigona are usually smaller, have a shorter and more angular wing and are a lighter shade of orange. Some specimens of cupida may be nearly impossible to separate from similar forms of brunneipennis, but the later are usually a darker glossy red-brown color. Questionable specimens must be identified by genitalic characters. Adults and genitalia of both sexes are illustrated by Lafontaine (1998)

Abagrotis denticulata

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Abagrotis discoidalis

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

SeasonalityAlberta adults are on the wing late June through mid-August. IdentificationOne of the small western species of Abagrotis. Superficially they resembles A. hermina in having dark brown forewings and pale hindwings. However they can be easily separated from other species of Abagrotis by the dark streak passing through the orbicular and reniform spots, and in particular by the black filling in the space between the two spots. Even in poorly marked specimens some evidence of this streak will show. In this character they resemble some species of Euxoa.

Abagrotis dodi

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

IdentificationA small (2.4-2.5 cm wingspan) moth with dark brown forewings and dark sooty brown hindwings, with few obvious markings. The forewings may range in color from grey brown to red-brown, but Alberta specimens examined are dark (almost black) red-brown. Markings consist of the round black orbicular and vertical oblong black reniform spots, outlined with slightly lighter brown. And a close examination will also show some black scaling marking partial antemedian and postmedian lines, and lighter scales marking the subterminal line. Sexes are alike, with females sometimes a bit paler and with a heavier, broader abdomen. They fly with and are easy to mistake for A. placida. Abagrotis placida are larger and have a contrasting paler terminal band on the forewings and slightly paler hindwings. Questionable specimens can be identified by examining the genitalia. Female have a rounded bursa with a single large signa (more oblong with a much “fatter” vesica with a larger more prominent terminal cornutus than placida. Adults and genitalia of both sexes are illustrated in Lafontaine (1998).

Abagrotis duanca

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

SeasonalityIn Alberta it flies in late June and July. IdentificationA. duanca is a medium-size dark blackish or red-brown Abagrotis superficially resembling a number of other Abagrotis sp., including placida, hermina, dodi and reedi. The contrasting pale-tipped scales of the prothoracic collar are diagnostic. The reniform and round orbicular are usually ringed with pale scales, which also mark the subterminal line. The hindwings are dull black.

Abagrotis erratica

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

SeasonalityAdults have been collected in Alberta in mid August. IdentificationOne of the larger (3.5-3.8 cm wingspan) Abagrotis sp. The rather broad forewings are pale pinkish-brown or grey-buff with a narrow oblong reniform spot, darker in the upper and lower part, and with a series of fine dots marking the outer edge of the postmedian line. The hindwings are pale grey or grey-brown. Characters that will separate erratica from other Alberta Abagrotis include biserrate male antennae, the sharply outlined reniform spot darker in the upper and lower portions, and the outer postmedian line reduced to a series of fine dots. Genital characters include the spinelike apex of the uncus and a globular rather than elongate vesica lacking a basal diverticula in the male, and two similar triangular signa in the bursa of the female. Abagrotis trigona is similar in appearance but is smaller, has dark hindwings, and the male has simple, beadlike antennae. Keys to the adults and illustrations of the genitalia of both sexes are available in Lafontaine (1998).

Abagrotis forbesi

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Abagrotis glenni

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Abagrotis hermina

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Abagrotis mirabilis

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Abagrotis nanalis

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

SeasonalityAdults have been collected in Alberta mid August - early September. IdentificationA small (2.5 cm wingspan) narrow-winged brown moth with longitudinal streaking, unlike any other member of the genus Abagrotis. The forewings are dark brown, usually paler yellow brown along the leading half. The veins are marked with dark scales, giving the wings a very streaky appearance. Normal lines and spots obsolete or nearly so. Hindwings light brown, darker in female, and with veins lined with brown scales.

Taxonomic Hierarchy for University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum