Kingdom - Animalia

Taxonomic Hierarchy for University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum


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9,867 results for "Animalia"

Cicindela limbata nympha

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Common NameSandy tiger beetle SeasonalityThese beetles have been collected from May through July. IdentificationIndividuals of Cicindela limbata nympha are distinguished by the pale elytra with reduced dark markings. The marginal band is expanded to cover most of the elytra leaving a narrow dark band down the center. A brown band identifies the subspecies C. l. nympha, a green band C. l. limbata. Specimens of C. l. hyperborea do not look like those of the southern subspecies. Markings are typical tiger beetle design with a brown elytral color. The greatly thickened elytral bands distinguish members of this subspecies from those of all other Maritima group species found in Alberta.

Cicindela limbata hyperborea

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Common NameSandy tiger beetle SeasonalityThese beetles have been collected from May through July. IdentificationIndividuals of Cicindela limbata nympha are distinguished by the pale elytra with reduced dark markings. The marginal band is expanded to cover most of the elytra leaving a narrow dark band down the center. A brown band identifies the subspecies C. l. nympha, a green band C. l. limbata. Specimens of Cicindela l. hyperborea do not look like those of the southern subspecies. Markings are typical tiger beetle design with a brown elytral color. The greatly thickened elytral bands distinguish members of this subspecies from those of all other Maritima group species found in Alberta.

Euchloe olympia

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Common NameOlympia Marble SeasonalityOne yearly generation, with peak adult flight activity from mid May to mid June. IdentificationThere are three superficially similar marble species in the province. The Olympia Marble is unlike other marbles in that the green markings of the underside are quite reduced, with a banded rather than a blotchy appearance. This species is also restricted to prairie grassland habitat.

Colias christina

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Common NameChristina's Sulphur SeasonalityOne yearly flight, peaking from late June to mid August depending on habitat. IdentificationMales of the Christina Sulphur can be recognized by the following characteristics: at least some bright orange on the upperside, but not extending all the way to the base of the forewing (as in C. meadii and C. canadensis), row of underside submarginal spots absent (usually) or weakly developed (rarely). Females are more difficult to identify with certainty because of the huge amount of variation they exhibit, both in ground colour (Orange, yellow, cream or white) and the extent of the dark border (nearly absent to well-developed). However, like the males, the underside spots are usually absent, and orange forms have a yellow forewing base. Our northern boreal populations are subspecies christina (Christina was described from northeastern Alberta), but designation of a subspecies to non-boreal populations remains uncertain (Bird et al. 1995).

Colias alexandra

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Common NameAlexandra's Sulphur SeasonalityTwo broods, peaking in late May to mid June and late July to mid August. IdentificationA combination of the following traits will usually distinguish this species: hindwing underside quite greenish, with no row of dark spots and an unbordered, silver discal spot; upperside bright, cold-yellow with no trace of orange. It is found only in prairie (rarely in the southern foothills) grassland habitat.

Neophasia menapia

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Common NamePine White SeasonalityOne Annual brood, flying in August. IdentificationNo other white has the black leading forewing edge, joined to the black mark at the end of the discal cell. Of the described subspecies, Canadian populations have been assigned to menapia (Bird et al. 1995, Layberry et al. 1998), but more recent treatments suggest the most appropriate name for our populations is tau (Austin 1998, Guppy & Shepard 2001).

Pontia protodice

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Common NameCheckered White SeasonalityA single brood annually, which flies in mid July to mid August. IdentificationThe Checkered White and the other two Pontia whites can be a challenge to identify. The Spring White (Pontia sisymbrii) is easiest to distinguish; the dark vein markings on the hindwing underside are not connected laterally, and it occurs only in montane woodlands and extreme northern Alberta. The Western and Checkered White (P. protodice) are more difficult to separate. Males of occidentalis are more heavily marked than protodice, particularly on the underside. Females of both species have heavier markings than the males, but these markings are brown in protodice, not charcoal or black. Another characteristic is found on the underside of the forewing apex: P. occidentalis has the dark submarginal band connected with dark markings along the veins to the wing margin, P. protodice has only pale yellow scales here. There are no named subspecies.

Pontia occidentalis occidentalis

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Neominois ridingsii

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Common NameRidings' Satyr SeasonalityThe singly yearly brood flies from mid June to early July. IdentificationSandy, greyish-brown with a broad, irregular tan-white submarginal band. Two forewing eyespots. The underside is most similar to Oeneis alberta, but the contrasty, grey-brown and white upperside of ridingsii is unique. Subspecies minimus occurs in Alberta.

Oeneis alberta

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Common NameAlberta Arctic SeasonalityOne annual brood, peaking from early to late May. IdentificationThe upperside is dull ochre-brown, with a variable number of small black eyespots, usually two on the forewing and one on the hindwing. The underside is finely striated black and white, with a distinct hindwing median band. The hindwing veins are outlined in white, unlike O. uhleri. The nominate subspecies (described from the mouth of Fish Creek near Calgary) occurs throughout southern Alberta. The Peace River populations are a darker, unnamed subspecies (Bird et al. 1995). D. Macaulay image

Oeneis bore edwardsi

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Oeneis polixenes

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Common NamePolixenes Arctic SeasonalityOne yearly flight, peaking in early to late July. IdentificationThe upperside is an even greyish brown without any markings, although the underside markings are vaguely visible through the translucent wings. Underside mottled with black and grey, and with a distinct median band. Similar to O. bore, but lacks the light shading along the hindwing veins. Alberta populations are subspecies brucei.

Speyeria edwardsii

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Common NameEdwards' Fritillary SeasonalityOne flight per year, peaking in mid June to late July, slightly later in the foothills. IdentificationThis is one of the larger fritillaries, and one of four species that usually have a greenish underside (egleis, mormonia and callippe are the others). Edwardsii is much larger than mormonia, with a pointier forewing, and is darker brown-green below with smaller upperside black marks compared to callippe. It is slightly larger with a lighter upperside compared to egleis.

Boloria epithore

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Common NamePacific Fritillary SeasonalityOne brood per year flying in June and July depending on snowpack and elevation. IdentificationThe wing upperside is typical of the genus, with rows of black spots on a rust-orange background. The hindwing underside lacks prominent pale markings. Distinguished from B. bellona, which is most similar in appearance, by the evenly-rounded forewing edge, which is angular in bellona giving a squared-off appearance. It is unclear which subspecies name best applies to Alberta populations. Layberry et al. (1998) and Bird et al. (1995) assign the name uslui, while Guppy & Shepard (2001) apply the name chermocki; Pyle (2002) reports uslui falls within the variation range of chermocki, so perhaps the use of the name chermocki is most appropriate.

Boloria astarte

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Common NameAstarte Fritillary SeasonalityOne yearly flight, peaking in July. IdentificationThis is a large Boloria; the upperside is bright orange with a well-defined, crisp, black pattern. The silvery white hindwing underside median band, and overall brighter colour, will disintguish it from B. alberta. The Astarte Fritillary was described from specimens collected at Rock Lake near Jasper. It has been treated as a subspecies of the European B. tritonia by some authors (eg. Guppy & Shepard 2001) due to the apparent absence of disinguishing morphological traits between the two; more evidence is however needed to support this interpretation.

Euphydryas gillettii

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Common NameGillett's Checkerspot SeasonalityOne brood per year, flight peaking in late June to mid July. IdentificationThe broad, continuous orange submarginal band is very dsistinctive; other checkerspots are checkered rather than banded. There are no named subspecies.

Chlosyne acastus

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Common NameSagebrush Checkerspot SeasonalityOne flight per year, peaking in late June to late July. IdentificationThe orange and black-brown patterned upperside, and prominent creamy-white spots of the hindwing underside, are characteristic of three of our Chlosyne, namely acastus, palla, and damoetas. Acastus has more extensive whitish underside markings and a lighter orange upperside than palla and damoetas. The habitat and range of acastus does not overalp with the other similar Chlosyne species in Alberta. Alberta populations are subspecies acastus.

Chlosyne palla

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Common NameNorthern Checkerspot SeasonalityOne yearly flight, peak activity between late June and late July. IdentificationThe upperside exhibits the typical checkerspot pattern of orange and brown-black, with a checkered orange-red and cream underside. Superficially similar to the Euphydryas checkerspots, but distinguished by the absence of cream-white spots on the upperside. More difficult to separate from the Rockslide Checkerspot (C. damoetas), which has a slightly duller, dingier look to it, with fewer dark markings on the forewing top. Damoetas is found only above treeline in rockslides and boulder fields, Northern Checkerspots rarely wander up this high. D. Macaulay image
It is not clear which subspecies name best applies to Alberta populations (Bird et al. 1995). The Peace River population represents an undescribed subspecies.

Chlosyne gorgone

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Common NameGorgone Checkerspot SeasonalityOne (occasionally two) flights per year, peaking in June and early September. IdentificationThe black and orange spots and bands of the wing upperside are more reminiscent of crescents (Phyciodes) than other checkerspots. The hindwing underside is unique among other Alberta checkerspots and crescents, consisting of a brown-grey ground colour with a median band composed of whitish arrow-shaped crescents.
D. Macaulay image
Subspecies carlota is credited to our fauna.

Limenitis lorquini

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Common NameLorquin's Admiral SeasonalityAdults fly from June to September; peaking in July (Bird et al., 1995). IdentificationAlthough this is a large butterfly, it is slightly smaller than other admirals, with a wingspan of 51 to 67 mm. Dorsal wing surface is black with white median bands on all wings; the distinctive forewing tips are orange. Ventral wing surface is reddish-brown with white marginal bands. It is easily distinguished from Weidemeyer's Admiral (L. weidemeyerii) and the White Admiral (L. arthemis) as they lack the orange forewing tips. However, this species hybridizes with White Admirals (L. arthemis) in southern Alberta. Hybrids have the orange wing tips as well as a wider white band on the fore and hindwings. The pale green eggs of L. lorquini are thimble-shaped and have deep pitted cells. There are fine glassy hairs where cells meet (Guppy & Shepard, 2001). Early instar larvae have large dark brown heads and olive green bodies with a pair of tubercles on the thorax and two pairs of tubercles on the abdomen. Late instar larvae resemble leaf droppings, mottled with olive and yellow and have a white patch on their back. The hump on the larvae of this species is smaller than those found on larvae of other admiral species (Guppy & Shepard, 2001). Pupae are large and have a keel projecting from the back of the thorax. The wings and the back of the abdomen are dark green-grey, the thorax is mottled (Guppy & Shepard, 2001).

Taxonomic Hierarchy for University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum