Family - Apidae

Taxonomic Hierarchy for University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum


Results

51 results for "Apidae"

Anthophora bomboides

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Anthophora occidentalis

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Anthophora terminalis

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Apis mellifera

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Bombus balteatus

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Bombus bifarius

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Bombus borealis

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

SeasonalityAmong the latest of Bombus species to emerge from hibernation and establish nests in spring (Hobbs 1966). IdentificationBombus borealis belongs to the subgenus Subterraneobombus in which females can be distinguished by small ocelli at the supraorbital line (Thorp et al. 1983), while males can be distinguished by spoon-shaped penis valvesthat are turned inwardsas well as the presence of a raised longitudinal keel posteriorly on sternum 6 (Williams et al. 2008)B. borealis individuals have white pile on the face between the eyes;the fifth antennal segment is longer than the fourth or third;the first four abdominal segments are covered with yellow pile, while the remaining segments are black;and the outer surface of the male hind tibia is concave (Franklin 1912). The length of the queen varies from 15 mm to 19 mm; her wing spread from 32 mm to 39 mm; and the width of the second abdominal segment 8 mm to 9.5 mm. Workers vary in length from 10 mm to 15 mm; in wing spread from 26 mm to 32 mm; and in width of the second abdominal segment from 6.5 mm to 8 mm. Males range in length from 12 mm to 15 mm; in wing spread from 26 mm to 31 mm; and in width of second abdominal segment from 6 mm to 7.5 mm (Franklin 1912).

Bombus centralis

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

SeasonalityFlight period of queens ranges from late April to early September; workers: early May to early September; males: early May to early October (Thorp et al., 1983). IdentificationBombus centralis belongs to the diverse subgenus Pyrobombus Dalla Torre which is characterized by a malar space of medium length but longer than its apical width and antennal flagellum 2.5 to 3x the length of the scape. The penis valves of the males are usually hook shaped (Thorp et al., 1983). Bombus centralis has a large, densely yellow haired body with a distinct black band between the bases of the wings. Females have reddish-orange pile on third and fourth abdominal segments (Curry 1984) while males have reddish pile on abdominal segments 3 thru 5 (Thorp et al. 1983). Pile at the base of the legs is often light (Franklin 1912). Body size and wingspan varies between castes: queens are 12.5 to 16 mm with wingspans of 29 to 33 mm, workers range between 9.5 to 12.5 mm with wingspans of 23 to 28 mm, and males are 10 to 13 mm with wingspans of 22 to 29 mm. Wings are lightly stained brown in all castes (Franklin 1912). Male genitalia are similar to B. flavifrons with smoothly rounded, sickle shaped penis valves, narrow valsellae and a weakly trilobate sternite 8 that is apically membraneous (Thorp et al. 1983, Franklin 1912).

Bombus citrinus

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Bombus cryptarum

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Bombus fervidus

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

SeasonalityMales are found flying from early July to early October, workers from early May to late October, and queens from early April to late October (Thorp et al. 1983). IdentificationFemales of the subgenus Fervidobombus have ocelli onthe supraorbital line, and first flagellomere that are shorter than the second and third flagellomeres combined; males have can be distinguished by first flagellomere that are shorter than the third flagellomere and apically turned penis valves (Thorp et al. 1983). Bombus fervidus males have dorsal abdominal segments 1-5 covered with yellow pile with segment 6 covered with black pile; females have dorsal abdominal segments 1-4 covered with yellow pile while segments 5 and 6 have black pile (Franklin 1912). Female wings are darker stained than males; the malar space of both sexes is one-third the length of the eye (Franklin 1912). Bombus fervidus is easily confused with B. californicus, but can be distinguished by yellow pile on the scutellum, thoracic pleura, and metasomaltergites 1-3, while B. californicus has black pile in these areas (Thorp et al. 1983). Franklin (1912) gives the following morphological indices for castes of B. fervidus. Queens range in length from 15 mm to 21 mm; wing spread from 37 mm to 41 mm; and width of second abdominal segment from 8.5 mm to 10.5 mm. Workers vary in length from 8 mm to 15 mm; wing spread from 17 mm to 35 mm; and width of second abdominal segment from 3.5 mm to 8 mm. Length of males ranges from 10 mm to 16 mm; wing spread from 25 mm to 33 mm; and width of second abdominal segment from 6 mm to 8 mm.

Bombus flavidus

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Bombus flavifrons

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

SeasonalityFlight period of queens ranges from late March to late August; workers: late April to late September; males: late May to late September (Thorp et al. 1983). IdentificationBombus flavifrons belongs to the diverse subgenus Pyrobombus Dalla Torre which is characterized by a malar space of medium length but longer than its apical width and antennal flagellum 2.5 to 3x the length of the scape. The penis valves of the males are usually hook shaped (Thorp et al., 1983). The robust body of B. flavifrons is densely covered in coarse yellow and black pile. The face and head are primarily yellow (Franklin 1912) and mixed with black on the anterior scutum (Thorp et al. 1983). Abdominal segments 3 and 4 are typically black but males may have yellow pile and females, reddish pile on the apical portion (Thorp et al. 1983). Pile at the base of the legs is light and the wings subhyaline (Franklin 1912). Body size and wingspan varies between castes: queens are 13 to 16 mm with wingspans of 27 to 34 mm, workers range between 9 to 12 mm with wingspans of 19 to 27 mm, and males are 11 to 12 mm with wingspans of 25 to 26 mm (Franklin 1912). The male genitalia is very similar to B. centralis with smoothly rounded, sickle shaped penis valves, narrow valsellae and a weakly trilobate sternite 8 that is apically membraneous (Thorp et al. 1983, Franklin 1912).

Bombus frigidus

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Bombus grisseocollis

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Bombus huntii

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

SeasonalityQueens fly from late March to late September, workers from late May to early October, and males from late May to late October (Thorp et al., 1983). IdentificationBombus huntii belongs to the subgenus Pyrobombus, which is characterized by antennal flagella 2.5 to 3 times longer than the scape, and by the malar space, the area from the bottom of the compound eye to the base of the mandible, which is less than twice as long as it is wide (Thorp et al., 1983). Males are distinguished by penis valves that are apically recurved inwards or are hook-shaped. The body of B. huntii is covered in dense, medium length pile (Franklin, 1912). In males, the face, occiput, and cheeks are covered in yellow pile, whereas females have black cheeks. The thorax is mainly yellow, with a black band between the wings that has a nearly straight rear margin. Segments one and four of the abdomen are yellow, two and three are ferruginous red, and the remaining two segments, five and six, are black; however, black hairs may be admixed throughout the abdomen. The wings of the queen are strongly brown, while workers and males wings are lighter coloured and are typically subhyaline. Body length and wingspan differs between castes: queens are 14 to 19 mm in length with a wingspan of 36 to 37 mm, workers range in length from 9 to 13 mm with a wingspan of 20 to 28 mm, and male body length is from 11 to 12 mm with a wingspan from 25 to 27 mm.

Bombus hyperboreus

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Bombus insularis

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

SeasonalityQueens may be seen flying from late March to late October; males from late April to late September (Thorp et al. 1983). IdentificationBombus insularis belongs to the subgenus Psithyrus which was historically treated as a separate genus from the rest of the Bombus due to its parasitic lifestyle (Alford 1975). Michener (2000) considers all species formerly treated as Psithyrus to be Bombus. Psithyrusis a parasitic subgenus, and all species lack a worker caste, cannot produce wax, have a stronger exoskeleton, and have no pollen baskets (Alford 1975). Psithyrus males can be distinguished by an almost straight penis valve shaped like an arrow head; the hind tibia of Psithyrus queens is convex with a hairy outer surface (Williams 2008). Bombus insularis queens have yellow pile covering the mesopleura to the base of legs, dark venter, fourth antennal segments that are much shorter than the third or the fifth, and moderately stained wings (Franklin 1912). Bombus insularis can be distinguished from the closely related Bombus fernaldae by the presence of yellow hair between the antennal bases (Thorp et al. 1983). Queens vary in length from 13.5 mm to 18 mm; in wingspan from 32 mm to 38 mm; and in width of second abdominal segment from 7 mm to 9 mm (Franklin 1912).

Bombus melanopygus

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Common NameOrange-rumped Bumble Bee SeasonalityFlight period of queens ranges early February to late October; workers: early April to early September; males: early May to early September (Thorp et al, 1983). IdentificationBombus melanopygus belongs to the diverse subgenus Pyrobombus Dalla Torre which is characterized by a malar space of medium length but longer than its apical width and antennal flagellum 2.5 to 3x the length of the scape. The penis valves of the males are usually hook shaped (Thorp et al., 1983). Bombus melanopygus has a large body densely covered in long, fine pile (Franklin 1912). Abdominal segment 1 is yellow, segments 2 and 3 are red or orange, and the remaining segments (4-6) are black. The anterior scutum and the vertex of head and face are covered in a mixture of black and yellow pile and appear clouded (Thorp et al. 1983; Curry 1984). Males tend to have less black pile on the face and the third antennal segment is shorter than the fifth but longer than the fourth (Franklin 1912). Body size and wingspan varies between castes: queens are 15 to 18 mm with wingspans of 29 to 36 mm, workers range between 11 to 15 mm with wingspans of 25 to 29 mm, and males are 9 to 13 mm with wingspans of 21 to 26 mm. Wings are darkly stained brown (Franklin 1912). The penis valve is rounded at the apex with a sharp angle at middle of apical curvature. The gonostylus is short and sternite 8 is uniformly thick (Thorp et al. 1983).

Bombus mixtus

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

SeasonalityFlight periods of queens ranges from early April to late October; workers: early April to late September; males: early May to late September (Thorp et al., 1983). IdentificationBombus mixtus belongs to the diverse subgenus Pyrobombus Dalla Torre which is characterized by a malar space of medium length but longer than its apical width and antennal flagellum 2.5 to 3x the length of the scape. The penis valves of the males are usually hook shaped (Thorp et al., 1983). Abdominal segment 3 of the large bodied B. mixtus is typically covered in black pile with reddish hair on the apical portion (Curry 1984; Franklin 1912). The remainder of the segments are yellow, cloudy yellow, or reddish yellow (Curry 1984; Franklin 1912). The pleura and the face are primarily yellow (Franklin 1912) and the mesonotum has an extensive amount of black pile between the wing bases but it does not form a distinct band (Curry 1984). There is large colour variation in males and they may look similar to B. edwardsii or B. sitkensis however, B. mixtus males have very distinct hair fringes on the inner faces of the antennal flagellomeres (Thorp et al. 1983). The malar space is as long as it is wide (Thorp et al., 1983). Body size and wingspan varies between castes: queens are 11 to 15 mm with wingspans of 27 to 31 mm, workers range between 7 to 11 mm with wingspans of 17 to 25 mm, and males are 8 to 11 mm with wingspans of 21 to 25 mm. Wings are lightly stained brown (Franklin 1912).

Taxonomic Hierarchy for University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum