Superfamily - Apoidea

Taxonomic Hierarchy for University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum


Results

122 results for "Apoidea"

Megachile relativa

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Common NameLeafcutter bee SeasonalityEmerge early July to early August (Fye 1965). May to October in southern parts (Mitchell 1962). IdentificationFemales: Relatively small body size with a length of 9-12 mm, stout and completely black body with yellow spurs (articulated spine). Eyes become slightly convergent near the bottom. Soft downy hair (pubescence) is white and is quite dense around the antennae, lower face, cheeks, lateral and posterior thorax, lateral abdomen, and between dorsal abdomen segments. Wings are subhyaline (sub transparent). Large cheeks, only slightly wider than the eyes and mouth mandibles have 5 tooth projections. Pollen collecting “scopa” on the ventral abdomen with dense yellowish short hairs. (Mitchell 1962). Males: Body length of 8-10 mm, stout and completely black body and slightly reddish legs. Eyes become slightly convergent near the bottom. Large cheeks that are slightly wider then the eyes and mouth mandibles have 3 tooth projections. Pubescence are white and very dense around the antennae, lower face, cheeks below, lateral and posterior thorax. Wings are subhyaline (sub transparent). Tergum (dorsal abdomen segment) 7 is prominent, broad, short and has a deep excavation. Sternum (ventral abdomen segment) 5 is short and restricted. Sternum 6 has few setae on each side of the midline with no obvious apical lobe. Genital armatures have slender gonocoxites with a sharp appearing apex. (Mitchell 1962).

Megachile inermis

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Common NameLeafcutter bee SeasonalityJune to September. Nests constructed in July or August (Medler 1958). IdentificationFemales: Body is15-20mm long, stout and completely black body. Soft downy hair (pubescence) is whitish and dense around antennae, sides of face, on top of head and on sides of thorax and thicker blackish hair on dorsal surface of the thorax. Large cheeks (width is twice the size of the eyes) to house muscles used for cutting leaves and mouth mandibles have 5 tooth projections (Mitchell 1962). Deep indentation on each side of the middle bulge of the clypeus (front of head below the antennae and frons and attached to the labrum mouthpart) (Medler & Lussenhop 1968). Wings are subhyaline (sub transparent) with brownish veins. Pollen collecting “scopa” on the ventral abdomen with dense hair and pale yellowish colour (Mitchell 1962). Males: Body is 11-15 mm long, stout and completely black body. Pubescence is very dense and elongated around antennae, lower part of face, lower cheeks, posterior and sides of thorax. Pubescence elongate but less dense on dorsal surface of thorax. Large cheeks (width is twice the size of the eyes) and mouth mandibles have 3 tooth projections. Wings are subhyaline (sub transparent) with brownish veins. Robust and dense setae (bristle like-hair) on the sterna number 5 (ventral abdomen segments) and very dense setae on both sides of the midline of sterna number 6 and spine-like and elongated in the midline. Transverse apical lobe on sterna 6. Genital armatures have robust gonocoxites that are constricted medially and long setae on inner face. (Mitchell 1962).

Megachile perihirta

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Common NameWestern leafcutting bee SeasonalityFlight period mid June - early July, ending late July (Hobbs 1956) - August (Milne & Milne 1980). IdentificationFemales: Identify with caution. Practically undistinguishable from the females of Megachile latimanus Say. Body length is 13-14 mm, stout and completely black with yellowish spurs (articulate hairs). Mouth mandibles have 5 tooth projections. Soft, downy hair (pubescent) is dense and yellow on the lower cheeks, very dense and yellow on lateral and posterior thorax. Abdomen segments are fringed with short whitish hairs. Wings subhyaline (sub transparent) and quite smoky at the apical end. Tergum (dorsal abdomen segment) 6 slightly concave and sternum (ventral abdomen segment) 6 with pollen collecting “scopa” having dense yellowish hairs and scopa is orange in colour. (Mitchell 1962). Males: Similar to M. latimuanus but recognizable by the mid basitarsal (lower segments of legs) protuberance (swelling) being much smaller, narrow and keel-shaped compared to the blunt, robust protuberance of M. latimuanus. Body length is 12-13 mm, stout, black body with front legs yellowish. Large cheeks with concave inferior margin, nearly twice as wide as the eyes and mouth mandibles with 3-tooth projection. Pubescence is yellowish and is dense and elongate around the antennae, lower face, short and thin on the cheeks with a pair of short white hair (looks like lines). Abdomen segments are fringed with short whitish hairs. Long and bright yellow hairs on the scutum (dorsal surface of middle mesothorax segment). Front tarsi (lower segments on legs) are yellow and mid and hind femur (upper leg segment) are quite swollen. Wings are subhyaline (sub transparent) at the base and appear more cloudy at the apex. Genital armatures have robust gonocoxites, which constricts above the base, setae projects towards the apex, dorsal lobe is broad and flat and ventral lobe is curved and slender. (Mitchell 1962).

Megachile whelleri

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Megachile rotundata

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Common NameAlfalfa leafcutter bee SeasonalityEmerge early-late June and adult activity from early June-late September (Stephen & Torchio 1961). IdentificationFemale: Body is 8-9 mm long, robust, black body and legs, brownish circular tegulae (articulate sclerite at base of the costa vein) near base of wing and yellow spurs (articulated spine). Large cheeks slightly narrower than the eyes and mouth mandibles with 4 tooth projections. Soft, downy hair (pubescence) yellowish-white and short on the face and cheeks, more elongate and white on the lower cheeks. Pubescence dense around antennae (more yellowish), sides of face, lateral and posterior thorax (shorter and yellowish) and wing bases (more yellowish). Wings are subhyaline (sub transparent). Tergum (dorsal abdomen segments) 4-6 straight in profile with short suberect hairs and abdomen segments fringed with short yellowish-white hairs. (Mitchell 1962). The scopa (pollen-collected hair basket on ventral abdomen) is silvery gray in colour unlike most other leafcutter bees that have yellow, orange, tan or black scopa (Richards 1984). Males: Body is 7-8mm long, robust, black body, brownish tegulae, front tarsi (lower segments of leg) partly yellowish with yellow spurs. Cheeks considerably narrower than eyes and mouth mandibles with 3 tooth projections. Pubescence is considerably yellow on the face and dense around antennae, lower face region and front of face. Thorax pubescence is whitish, very dense on lateral and posterior surface and both yellowish or whitish on the dorsal surface. Wings are subhyaline and appear smoky near the apex. Sterna (ventral abdomen surface) 1 – 4 are exposed and have punctures and appear yellowish and hyaline with dense elongate white hairs. Sternum 5 is broad, median area has short, fine and dense setae and sternum 6 has an broad short apical lobe, incurved medially. Genital armatures have gonocoxites, which narrow above the base, is compressed, has a curved down apex, tip elongate and narrow, setae projects towards the apex, dorsal lobe is broad and flat and ventral lobe is curved and slender. (Mitchell 1962

Bombus mixtus

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

SeasonalityFlight periods of queens ranges from early April to late October; workers: early April to late September; males: early May to late September (Thorp et al., 1983). IdentificationBombus mixtus belongs to the diverse subgenus Pyrobombus Dalla Torre which is characterized by a malar space of medium length but longer than its apical width and antennal flagellum 2.5 to 3x the length of the scape. The penis valves of the males are usually hook shaped (Thorp et al., 1983). Abdominal segment 3 of the large bodied B. mixtus is typically covered in black pile with reddish hair on the apical portion (Curry 1984; Franklin 1912). The remainder of the segments are yellow, cloudy yellow, or reddish yellow (Curry 1984; Franklin 1912). The pleura and the face are primarily yellow (Franklin 1912) and the mesonotum has an extensive amount of black pile between the wing bases but it does not form a distinct band (Curry 1984). There is large colour variation in males and they may look similar to B. edwardsii or B. sitkensis however, B. mixtus males have very distinct hair fringes on the inner faces of the antennal flagellomeres (Thorp et al. 1983). The malar space is as long as it is wide (Thorp et al., 1983). Body size and wingspan varies between castes: queens are 11 to 15 mm with wingspans of 27 to 31 mm, workers range between 7 to 11 mm with wingspans of 17 to 25 mm, and males are 8 to 11 mm with wingspans of 21 to 25 mm. Wings are lightly stained brown (Franklin 1912).

Bombus flavifrons

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

SeasonalityFlight period of queens ranges from late March to late August; workers: late April to late September; males: late May to late September (Thorp et al. 1983). IdentificationBombus flavifrons belongs to the diverse subgenus Pyrobombus Dalla Torre which is characterized by a malar space of medium length but longer than its apical width and antennal flagellum 2.5 to 3x the length of the scape. The penis valves of the males are usually hook shaped (Thorp et al., 1983). The robust body of B. flavifrons is densely covered in coarse yellow and black pile. The face and head are primarily yellow (Franklin 1912) and mixed with black on the anterior scutum (Thorp et al. 1983). Abdominal segments 3 and 4 are typically black but males may have yellow pile and females, reddish pile on the apical portion (Thorp et al. 1983). Pile at the base of the legs is light and the wings subhyaline (Franklin 1912). Body size and wingspan varies between castes: queens are 13 to 16 mm with wingspans of 27 to 34 mm, workers range between 9 to 12 mm with wingspans of 19 to 27 mm, and males are 11 to 12 mm with wingspans of 25 to 26 mm (Franklin 1912). The male genitalia is very similar to B. centralis with smoothly rounded, sickle shaped penis valves, narrow valsellae and a weakly trilobate sternite 8 that is apically membraneous (Thorp et al. 1983, Franklin 1912).

Bombus melanopygus

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Common NameOrange-rumped Bumble Bee SeasonalityFlight period of queens ranges early February to late October; workers: early April to early September; males: early May to early September (Thorp et al, 1983). IdentificationBombus melanopygus belongs to the diverse subgenus Pyrobombus Dalla Torre which is characterized by a malar space of medium length but longer than its apical width and antennal flagellum 2.5 to 3x the length of the scape. The penis valves of the males are usually hook shaped (Thorp et al., 1983). Bombus melanopygus has a large body densely covered in long, fine pile (Franklin 1912). Abdominal segment 1 is yellow, segments 2 and 3 are red or orange, and the remaining segments (4-6) are black. The anterior scutum and the vertex of head and face are covered in a mixture of black and yellow pile and appear clouded (Thorp et al. 1983; Curry 1984). Males tend to have less black pile on the face and the third antennal segment is shorter than the fifth but longer than the fourth (Franklin 1912). Body size and wingspan varies between castes: queens are 15 to 18 mm with wingspans of 29 to 36 mm, workers range between 11 to 15 mm with wingspans of 25 to 29 mm, and males are 9 to 13 mm with wingspans of 21 to 26 mm. Wings are darkly stained brown (Franklin 1912). The penis valve is rounded at the apex with a sharp angle at middle of apical curvature. The gonostylus is short and sternite 8 is uniformly thick (Thorp et al. 1983).

Bombus centralis

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

SeasonalityFlight period of queens ranges from late April to early September; workers: early May to early September; males: early May to early October (Thorp et al., 1983). IdentificationBombus centralis belongs to the diverse subgenus Pyrobombus Dalla Torre which is characterized by a malar space of medium length but longer than its apical width and antennal flagellum 2.5 to 3x the length of the scape. The penis valves of the males are usually hook shaped (Thorp et al., 1983). Bombus centralis has a large, densely yellow haired body with a distinct black band between the bases of the wings. Females have reddish-orange pile on third and fourth abdominal segments (Curry 1984) while males have reddish pile on abdominal segments 3 thru 5 (Thorp et al. 1983). Pile at the base of the legs is often light (Franklin 1912). Body size and wingspan varies between castes: queens are 12.5 to 16 mm with wingspans of 29 to 33 mm, workers range between 9.5 to 12.5 mm with wingspans of 23 to 28 mm, and males are 10 to 13 mm with wingspans of 22 to 29 mm. Wings are lightly stained brown in all castes (Franklin 1912). Male genitalia are similar to B. flavifrons with smoothly rounded, sickle shaped penis valves, narrow valsellae and a weakly trilobate sternite 8 that is apically membraneous (Thorp et al. 1983, Franklin 1912).

Apis mellifera

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Bombus sp.

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Megabombus sp.

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Halictus sp.

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Osmia sp.

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Bombus borealis

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

SeasonalityAmong the latest of Bombus species to emerge from hibernation and establish nests in spring (Hobbs 1966). IdentificationBombus borealis belongs to the subgenus Subterraneobombus in which females can be distinguished by small ocelli at the supraorbital line (Thorp et al. 1983), while males can be distinguished by spoon-shaped penis valvesthat are turned inwardsas well as the presence of a raised longitudinal keel posteriorly on sternum 6 (Williams et al. 2008)B. borealis individuals have white pile on the face between the eyes;the fifth antennal segment is longer than the fourth or third;the first four abdominal segments are covered with yellow pile, while the remaining segments are black;and the outer surface of the male hind tibia is concave (Franklin 1912). The length of the queen varies from 15 mm to 19 mm; her wing spread from 32 mm to 39 mm; and the width of the second abdominal segment 8 mm to 9.5 mm. Workers vary in length from 10 mm to 15 mm; in wing spread from 26 mm to 32 mm; and in width of the second abdominal segment from 6.5 mm to 8 mm. Males range in length from 12 mm to 15 mm; in wing spread from 26 mm to 31 mm; and in width of second abdominal segment from 6 mm to 7.5 mm (Franklin 1912).

Bombus terricola

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

SeasonalityAmong the earliest bumblebees to emerge and establish nests in spring (Hobbs 1968). IdentificationFemales of the subgenus Bombus s. str. can be distinguished by ocelli on the superorbital line, and flagellomere one being equal in length to flagellomere three. Bombus s.str. males can be distinguished by non-protuberant compound eyes, short antennae, and penis valves that form a wide vertical plate (Thorp et al. 1983). Bombus terricola have abdominal segments 1 and 4-6 covered with black pile while segments 2-3 are covered with yellow pile; the malar space is one-fifth to one-sixth the length of the eye(Franklin 1912). Bombus terricola can be distinguished from its close ally Bombus occidentalis nigroscutatus by the presence of yellow pile on the second abdominal segment (Franklin 1912). Franklin (1912) describes the queen as varying in length from 15 mm to 18 mm; in wing spread from 37 mm to 40 mm; and in width of second abdominal segment from 10 mm to 10.5 mm. Workers range in length from 10 mm to 14 mm; in wing spread from 26 mm to 33 mm; and in width of second abdominal segment from 5 mm to 8 mm. The length of males varies from 11 mm to 15 mm; wing spread from 27 mm to 33 mm; and the width of second abdominal segment from 6.5 mm to 8 mm.

Bombus insularis

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

SeasonalityQueens may be seen flying from late March to late October; males from late April to late September (Thorp et al. 1983). IdentificationBombus insularis belongs to the subgenus Psithyrus which was historically treated as a separate genus from the rest of the Bombus due to its parasitic lifestyle (Alford 1975). Michener (2000) considers all species formerly treated as Psithyrus to be Bombus. Psithyrusis a parasitic subgenus, and all species lack a worker caste, cannot produce wax, have a stronger exoskeleton, and have no pollen baskets (Alford 1975). Psithyrus males can be distinguished by an almost straight penis valve shaped like an arrow head; the hind tibia of Psithyrus queens is convex with a hairy outer surface (Williams 2008). Bombus insularis queens have yellow pile covering the mesopleura to the base of legs, dark venter, fourth antennal segments that are much shorter than the third or the fifth, and moderately stained wings (Franklin 1912). Bombus insularis can be distinguished from the closely related Bombus fernaldae by the presence of yellow hair between the antennal bases (Thorp et al. 1983). Queens vary in length from 13.5 mm to 18 mm; in wingspan from 32 mm to 38 mm; and in width of second abdominal segment from 7 mm to 9 mm (Franklin 1912).

Bombus fervidus

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

SeasonalityMales are found flying from early July to early October, workers from early May to late October, and queens from early April to late October (Thorp et al. 1983). IdentificationFemales of the subgenus Fervidobombus have ocelli onthe supraorbital line, and first flagellomere that are shorter than the second and third flagellomeres combined; males have can be distinguished by first flagellomere that are shorter than the third flagellomere and apically turned penis valves (Thorp et al. 1983). Bombus fervidus males have dorsal abdominal segments 1-5 covered with yellow pile with segment 6 covered with black pile; females have dorsal abdominal segments 1-4 covered with yellow pile while segments 5 and 6 have black pile (Franklin 1912). Female wings are darker stained than males; the malar space of both sexes is one-third the length of the eye (Franklin 1912). Bombus fervidus is easily confused with B. californicus, but can be distinguished by yellow pile on the scutellum, thoracic pleura, and metasomaltergites 1-3, while B. californicus has black pile in these areas (Thorp et al. 1983). Franklin (1912) gives the following morphological indices for castes of B. fervidus. Queens range in length from 15 mm to 21 mm; wing spread from 37 mm to 41 mm; and width of second abdominal segment from 8.5 mm to 10.5 mm. Workers vary in length from 8 mm to 15 mm; wing spread from 17 mm to 35 mm; and width of second abdominal segment from 3.5 mm to 8 mm. Length of males ranges from 10 mm to 16 mm; wing spread from 25 mm to 33 mm; and width of second abdominal segment from 6 mm to 8 mm.

Bombus nevadensis

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

SeasonalityQueens found flying from early April to late September, males from early July to late August, and workers from late May to late September (Thorp et al. 1983). IdentificationBombus nevadensis belongs to the subgenus Bombias in which females have large ocelli well below the supraorbital line and malar space longer than wide; males have protuberant compound eyes, convergent above, with straight penis valves (Thorp et al. 1983). Both sexes of Bombias are further distinguished by hind tibia with a fringe of very short hairs (Williams 2008). Bombus nevadensis females have head and pleura covered with black pile, while the face and pleura of males have yellow pile. The dorsal side of the first three abdominal segments is covered with yellow pile, while the rest are covered with black pile in both sexes (Franklin 1912). The only close ally in the western hemisphere, Bombus auricomus, can be distinguished by a broad black interalar band on females and by apical abdominal segments with black pile on males. Bombus nevadensis are large bumble bees with queens varying in length from 18 mm to 22 mm; in wing spread from 42 mm to 48 mm; and in width of second abdominal segment from 9.5 mm. Workers range in length from 15 mm to 18 mm; in wing spread from 38 mm to 42 mm; and width of second abdominal segment from 9 mm to 9.5 mm. The length of males varies from 13 mm to 17 mm; wing spread from 32 mm to 37 mm and the width of the second abdominal segment from 7 mm to 8.5 mm.

Bombus citrinus

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Taxonomic Hierarchy for University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum