Family - Staphylinidae

Taxonomic Hierarchy for University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum


Results

99 results for "Staphylinidae"

Acidota crenata

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Acidota quadrata

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Aleochara bilineata

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Aleochara castaneipennis

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Anotylus sobrinus

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Bisnius tereus

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Bolitobius horni

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Bryoporus rufescens

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Carphacis nepigonensis

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Creophilus maxillosus

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Common NameHairy rove beetle SeasonalityMore abundant in early spring and early fall but also active in the summer. IdentificationThe head and thorax of the larva are of dark red to dark brown color. Its abdomen is of a dirty gray to brown color (Voris, 1939). A mature larva is about 20 to 25mm in length and 3.5mm in width (Voris, 1939). Larvae are cylindrical and stout (Voris, 1939). The adult C. maxillosus is a large rove beetle with a size varying between 12 and 23mm (Arnett and Thomas, 2000). This shiny black species is characterized by the presence of yellow-gray setae on the posterior angles of the head and anterior angle of the pronotum (Arnett and Thomas, 2000). The yellow-gray setae are more obviously found on the 2nd and 3rd (sometime 4th) abdominal segments and on the elytra where they form wide variable bands encircling the body. Like the other species of the genus Creophilus, the disk of the pronotum and most of the disc on the neck are nearly free of punctures or setae (Smetana and Davies, 2000). The tarsal formula is 5-5-5 and the legs are entirely black. The antennae are composed of 11 segments.

Dinothenarus badipes

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

SeasonalityMost specimens in collections were collected during April and May. IdentificationThe adult size of D. badipes is on average between 13 and 19 mm long (Downie and Arnett, 1996). The entire dorsal surface of D. badipes is black or dark brown with black pubescence (Arnett and Thomas, 2000). Head and elytra finely but densely punctate. The femurs and tibiae are red or reddish-brown and so are the coxae. Antennae have 11 antenomeres and are also red or reddish-brown. The mandibles are reddish-brown basally but dark or nearly black apically. Each abdominal sternum (ventral surface of abdominal segments) has a transverse bar of golden pubescence on the anterior side which is sometimes not easily seen (Smetana and Davies, 2000). The tarsal formula is 5-5-5.

Dinothenarus capitatus

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

SeasonalityThe only D. capitatus specimen in the Strickland Museum was collected in June. IdentificationThe size of an adult D. capitatus ranges between 12.5 to 15mm (Downie and Arnett, 1996). The adult D. capitatus is quickly recognized by a densely punctate head with dark yellow color. The temples are almost straight behind the eye (Smetana and Davies, 2000). The color of the head contrasts with the dark brown pronotum and abdomen. The pronotum is covered with patches of yellow setae among the black setae (Downie and Arnett, 1996). The legs are mostly dark brown with some dark yellow area on dorsal side of femur and tibia. The antennae are slightly darker than the head. The densely punctate elytra are covered with widely scattered smooth spots with dark pubescent (Downie and Arnett, 1996). Abdominal terga (dorsal abdominal segment) 2-4 with H-shaped velvety spot at middle and segment 5-6 with gray pubescence (Downie and Arnett, 1996). The gray pubescence is also present on nearly all sternites (ventral abdominal segment). Tarsal formula 5-5-5 and 11 antenomeres with the last one transverse. The last segment of the labial palp is narrow and fusiliform (Downie and Arnett, 1996).

Dinothenarus pleuralis

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

SeasonalitySpecimens in the Strickland Museum were collected in July, August and October. IdentificationAdult D. pleuralis are about 13mm in size. Dinothenaus pleuralis has dark red elytra. This color is also present on the antennae and the legs. The coxae are darker but have a remnant of leg color. On the scutellum, are many small patches of yellow setae anteriorly (Arnett and Thomas, 2000). Also, the first visible abdominal segment is covered with yellow setae while the other segments only have few yellow setae anteriorly.

Eucnecosum brunnescens

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Eusphalerum fenyesi

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Eusphalerum grayae

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Gabrius brevipennis

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Gabrius picipennis

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Gabrius sp.

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Ischnosoma fimbriatum

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Taxonomic Hierarchy for University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum