Genus - Pardosa

Taxonomic Hierarchy for University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum


Results

20 results for "Pardosa"

Pardosa concinna

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

SeasonalityAdults have been found between May and August, egg sacs found from June to early September. IdentificationFemale: Total length 5.5-7.5 mm. Chelicerae and cephalothorax dark reddish-brown. Carapace has a pale stripe down the middle that widens towards its middle, and two submarginal stripes of similar color. Abdomen quite variable in color - may be gray or brown, sometimes with a row of chevrons, sometimes with black mottling. Hooded epigynum with one large cavity. Median septum is usually long, somewhat spatulate, and broad; and tapers significantly at its anterior end. Male: Total length 6-6.5 mm. Color and pattern similar to female. Terminal apophysis long and fingerlike. Two processes on the median apophysis; the distal process is long enough to reach the edge of the genital bulb (the basal bulb process is sharp and short). Base of embolus is quite stout; almost straight at distal end and can be described as "bladelike". Tibia of palpus has many long, curved setae.

Pardosa furcifera

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

SeasonalityRestricted. Females found from June - August, males found June – July. Egg sacs produced in July. IdentificationMale: Total length 7-9 mm. Cephalothorax reddish brown, with a bifurcated yellowish stripe down the center, as well as two lateral stripes of a similar color. Abdomen dark brown, with a short stripe anteriorly (heart mark) and a reddish brown venter. Cymbium dark, with prominent palea. Palea has oblique sclerotized channel. Embolus is fairly long and thin and only slightly curved. Median apophysis has two processes, at its tip and base. Terminal apophysis with two blunt processes at its tip. Female: Patterned similarly to male. Epigynum with shallow paired hood cavities. Paired dorsal excavations show through median septum to create rectangular area at its posterior. Spermathecae shaped like clubs, have some small nodules.

Pardosa fuscula

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

SeasonalityMales from May to August and females from May to October (Dondale & Redner, 1990; Pickavance 2001). IdentificationPardosa fuscula is the only species of the Pardosa atrata group present in North America (Dondale & Redner, 1987). Carapace (dorsal portion of the cephalothorax or head region) broad, dark brown, darker in the eye region, with two longitudinal lighter bands near the lateral edges (these bands more distinct in females), one smaller stripe the same color, over de dorsal mid line covering just the thoracic groove. Mouthparts: Chelicerae, labium, and endites dark brown. Sternum (ventral plate between legs) dark brown. Coxae (1st leg segment) and legs dark and dusky with dorsal black streaks, especially on femora (3rd leg segment). Abdomen dark brown to black with an antero-dorsal light patch, lighter ventrally. Length between 6.5 to 7.6 mm. Males are usually similar than females but darker and slightly smaller. Male palp (see additional picture, articulated appendages anterior to 1st pair of legs): Terminal apophysis (ta in image) small and curved, finger like, median apophysis (ma in image) big and swollen with two projections, anterior projection broad and curved posteriorly, posterior projection small and hooked anteriorly Female epigynum (see additional picture, located in the anterior ventral side of the abdomen): Wider than long, lateral plates (lp in image) broadly rounded on each side, posterior endings swollen (1 in image), anterior part of septum (s in image) slender and narrow, posterior part triangular fitting between posterior ends of lateral plates (2 in image), atrium (a in image) broad and rounded.

Pardosa hyperborea

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

SeasonalityMales have been collected from late May to early August and females from June to September (Dondale & Redner 1990; Pickavance 2001). IdentificationPardosa hyperborea is the only representative of the Pardosa saltuaria group in Canada (Dondale & Redner, 1987). Carapace (dorsal portion of the head region or cephalothorax) narrow, light brown, with two longitudinal dark brown stripes that go from the posterior end just to the anteiror eye row, clypeus (portion between anterior eye row and border of carapace) same color as sides; longitudinal dorsal mid line light brown, less conspicuous near postero-median eyes. Mouthparts: Chelicerae yellowish, darker in the apex; labium and endites same color as chelicerae. Sternum (plate between legs) dusky with a medial lighter patch. Coxae (1st leg segment) and femora (3rd leg segment) light brown; patella (4th leg segment), tibia (5th leg segment), metatarsi (7th leg segment) and tarsi (8th leg segment) darker, tibia with three inconspicuous lighter rings. Abdomen dark brown with a longitudinal medial light band bordered by a non continuous black line on each side, venter of abdomen lighter. Males and Females are similar in coloration and size but males are usually smaller; length ranges between 4.5 to 5.5mm. Male palp (see additional picture, articulated appendages anterior to 1st pair of legs): Terminal apophysis (ta in image) big, longer than wide, median apophysis (ma in image) small, with two projections, anterior projection short, posterior projections straight, directed backward, prominent. Female epigynum (see additional picture, located in the anterior ventral side of the abdomen): Two well separated anterior hoods (h in image), median septum (s in image) large, prominent and flat, lateral plates (lp in image) angular, laying below septum.

Pardosa mackenziana

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

SeasonalityMale and female adults forage from May to September (Buddle 2000), but are more common from late May to mid June (Buddle et al 2000). IdentificationPardosa mackenziana belongs to the Pardosa nigra group which is represented in Canada and Alaska by four more species (Lowrie & Dondale 1981 in Dondale & Redner 1990). Most of wolf spiders are very similar and usually differences are based on male and female sexual characters, however, size, distribution and coloration patterns usually help to differentiate some species. Carapace (dorsal portion of the head region or cephalothorax) broad, dark brown with a dorso-medial longitudinal lighter band which is constricted in its anterior third, no marginal bands present. Mouthparts: Chelicerae and fangs the same color as carapace; labium, endites slightly lighter in color with a pale anterior border. Sternum (ventral plate between legs) light brown. Femora (3rd leg segment) and tibia (5th leg segment) dusky with three inconspicuous lighter rings; patella (4th leg segment), metatarsi (6th leg segment) and tarsi (7th leg segment) brown. Abdomen with no markings, dorsally dark, lighter ventrally. Males and Females similar in coloration pattern but males smaller. Male palps (see additional picture, articulated appendages anterior to 1st pair of legs): Medial apophysis (ma in palp image) with two projections, anterior projection longer, curved and with several minute “teeth” on its tip, posterior projection smaller, rounded (rather conical); terminal apophysis (ta in palp image) slender and curved, with internal border toothed. Female epigynum (see additional picture, located in the anterior ventral side of the abdomen): Longer than wide, with two lateral dark swellings (1 in image), median septum with anterior part long and narrow (2 in image) and posterior part broader and ridged (3 in image).

Pardosa moesta

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

SeasonalityMales found April to August, females May to October, and egg sacs May to mid-October. IdentificationPardosa moesta looks somewhat different from other Pardosa, in that its carapace is shiny and dark (especially the eye area) and reddish brown, with a number of black lines radiating from the dorsal groove. The female often has pale median and submarginal bands. The sternum is also dark, reddish brown (Dondale & Redner, 1987) to black (Chamberlin, 1908). The chelicerae are dark orange, with 3 retromarginal teeth, and numerous tiny, black-tipped tubercles laterally, which distinguish this species from other, similar species. The legs are dark orange and paler towards the tips, usually with long dark streaks on the first and second pairs of legs in the male, and sometimes dark rings on the second and third pairs of legs. The abdomen is dull reddish mottled with black and brown, with a reddish heart mark (Dondale & Redner, 1987). The underside has one median and two lateral, irregular lines running to a point at the end of the abdomen (Chamberlin, 1908). Pardosa moesta is one of the smaller Pardosa species, with female length 5.64 +/- 0.57 mm and male length 4.95 +/- 0.40 mm. Female carapace width is 1.91 +/- 0.14 mm, and male carapace width is 1.82 +/- 0.23 mm wide. The palpal characteristics that distinguish this Pardosa moesta are a palea with a prominent, hooked process, and a terminal apophysis with 2 teeth. The distinguishing epigynal characteristics are an atrium that is expanded at both ends, epigynal hood cavities that are well separated, and a more or less rectangular transverse part of the median septum. Dissection will show that the spermathecae are large, ovoid, and covered with tiny nodules (Dondale & Redner, 1987).

Pardosa uintana

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

SeasonalityMales collected May to July, females and egg sacs from June to October (Dondale & Redner, 1990). IdentificationPardosa uintana looks similar to other Pardosa species, with a carapace that is dark brown to black, but which has a lighter band down the middle, and a dark, mottled abdomen. The legs are also dark brown, but become paler towards the tips and have indistinct, black rings (Lowrie & Dondale, 1981). The sternum is dark and the chelicerae light brown. Females and males have similar colouration, but females (length = 6.27 +/- 0.73 mm) are longer than males (length = 5.69 +/- 0.40 mm). Females also have a larger carapace width (2.24+/-0.09 mm) than males (2.18+/-0.13 mm)(Dondale & Redner, 1990). Pardosa uintana can be distinguished from other Pardosa by the shape of the epigynum in females and the palp in males. The epigynum is unique because of its lateral swellings that converge posteriorly, and because of its ovoid spermathecae, which are more than twice as long as they are wide, and which can best be seen after dissection. The palp is unique because of its tegulum, which can be seen from a side view to protrude greatly at the base (Lowrie & Dondale, 1981), and also because of its stout embolus, which has a helical tip, and its median apophysis with a short, slender, curved distal process (Dondale & Redner, 1990).

Pardosa tesquorum

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

SeasonalityMales collected mid-May to July, females mid-May to October, and egg sacs June to early October. IdentificationPardosa tesquorum looks similar to other Pardosa, with a dark reddish brown to black carapace that has a few radiating black lines, and pale median and submarginal bands, which are often indistinct or absent, especially anteriorly and in the male, and are thus not particularly useful characters to rely upon for identification. The sternum is dark brown to black, but sometimes has a yellow stripe down the middle at the anterior. The chelicerae are dark with pale, longitudinal streaks, and with two teeth on the retromargin of the fang furrow. (These will not be seen without a microscope.) The legs are orange with black streaks, and indistinct rings on the femora. The female has lighter legs and more distinct black rings than the male. The abdomen is almost black dorsally, but with a large pale heart mark, and a series of pale chevrons. The underside is yellow or gray, and darker toward the middle (Dondale & Redner, 1986). The female (length = 5.69 +/- 0.63 mm) is slightly longer than the male (length = 4.83 +/- 0.44 mm), with a slightly wider carapace (1.98 +/- 0.13 mm) than the male (1.83 +/- 0.15 mm). In order to distinguish P. tesquorum from other Pardosa, it is necessary to look at palpal and epigynal characteristics. The male palp is unique because of its terminal apophysis, which is broad and flat, and because of the slender curved hook on its palea. The epigynum is unique because of its median septum. This is broadest level with the copulatory openings, tapered anteriorly, and has deeply indented lateral margins of the epigynal plate (Dondale & Redner, 1986).

Pardosa xerampelina

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

SeasonalityMales collected April to July, females April to October, and egg sacs late May to October. IdentificationPardosa xerampelina is similar to other Pardosa with a carapace that is dark brown to black, but which has several radiating black lines (Dondale & Redner, 1986, 1990), and may have a pale, reddish median area which is widest around the dorsal groove, and is more prominent in females. Females also have pale submarginal bands. The sternum is also nearly black, but may have a pale median line (Chamberlin, 1908). The legs have femora that are dark brown and may have broad, but indistinct black rings (especially females), but the ends of the legs are a lighter brownish orange. The chelicerae are dark brown, but paler toward the middle. The abdomen is dark reddish-brown to black, and may have a dull red heart mark (Dondale & Redner, 1986, 1990), or a series of brown chevron-like markings (Chamberlin, 1908). Females (length = 6.76 +/- 0.78 mm) are longer than males (length = 6.26 +/- 0.49 mm), and are slightly larger-bodied in general; female carapace width = 2.66 +/- 0.27 mm, while male carapace width = 2.42 +/- 0.15 mm (Dondale & Redner, 1986, 1990). The male palp has an embolus that is long and stout at the base, but slender and slightly curved distally. The palpal character distinguishing male Pardosa xerampelina from other Pardosa is an elongate median apophysis which, from a ventral view, conceals most of the embolus. The epigynal characters distinguishing female P. xerampelina from other Pardosa are shallow hood cavities that are not directed mesally, and a median septum that widens anteriorly (Dondale & Redner, 1986, 1990).

Pardosa sp.

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Pardosa groenlandica

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

SeasonalityAdult males forage from early May to August, while females from mid May to mid September (Dondale & Redner 1990; Pickavance 2001). IdentificationPardosa groenlandica is included in the Pardosa modica group with 15 other species in Canada (Dondale & Redner 1990). Differentiation between species is based on sexual characters. Medium sized spiders (8.5-9-5mm long), carapace (dorsal portion of the head region or cephalothorax) broad, narrow at eye area, dark brown to dark reddish (darker at eye region) with three to four light brown spots on each side, dorsal mid line light brown, lighter and broader around thoracic groove. Mouthparts: Chelicerae long, hairy and dark brown, endites and labium dusky light brown. Sternum (ventral plate between legs) darker with an atero-median light patch narrowing to the center. Coxae (1st leg segment) light brown, lighter at the base, legs brown, lighter in apical segments and often with longitudinal light brown stains, especially on femora (3rd leg segment) and tibia (5th leg segment). Abdomen dark brown with a dorsal longitudinal anterior light patch; ventrally yellowish brown (especially in females, having the anterior portion light yellow). Males and females similar size and coloration pattern but males darker. Male palp (see additional picture, articulated appendages anterior to 1st pair of legs): Terminal apophysis (ta in image) elongated, curved and pointed apically, embolus (e in image) long and curved, median apophysis (ma in image) small with two projections, anterior projection smaller and rounded, posterior projection longer and beak-like. Female epigynum (see additional picture, located in the anterior ventral side of the abdomen): Longer than wide, broader posteriorly (triangular shape), median septum (ms in image) prominent, narrow in its anterior portion, lateral plates (lp in image) arched on each side with two swellings (1 and 2 in image), posterior swelling broad, cavity sclerites (cs in image) with anterior margin convex, atrium (a in image) longer than wide.

Pardosa distincta

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

SeasonalityMales are generally found from April to late August, while females are generally found between April and October. Egg sacs are produced between June and October. IdentificationFemale: Total length 5-6 mm. Cephalothorax (both dorsally and ventrally) and abdomen are generally dark brownish-grey. Stripes on carapace (medial and submarginal) are pale and wide, making it appear that the carapace is light greyish with two dark stripes. Epigynum hood is quite prominent; with a wide, shallow cavity. The median septum is thin at the anterior portion, and rounded at the posterior portion, and flat overall. There are a pair of yellowish stripes that are on either side of the pale heart mark, they merge and meet with the end of the heart mark. Sternum sometimes has mark shaped like a "V". Male: Total length 4.5 - 5 mm. Pattern is similar to female, but color is generally darker. Large, shiny sclerite on palea near base on embolus. The embolus itself is partially concealed by the median apophysis. Median apophysis has two processes: basal process is small and hooklike, while distal process is flat, curved, bumpy, and quite long. Heart mark is large and fairly vague in comparison to female. In both sexes, eastern specimens tend towards lighter coloration.

Pardosa mulaiki

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Pardosa modica

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

SeasonalityAdult males and females collected from April to July (Dondale & Redner, 1990). IdentificationPardosa modica is similar to other Pardosa, with a brown carapace that has a broken light brown to yellow (Kronestedt, 1981), or reddish (Chamberlin, 1908), band down the middle, and continuous lateral bands of similar colour, which are wider in the female. There are also two light spots just behind the eyes. The sternum is dark brown with a light, but indistinct median stripe (Kronestedt, 1981), bordered by black lines (Chamberlin, 1908). The chelicerae are light brown to yellow with darker streaks. The abdomen is grayish brown on top and mottled on the sides, and has a row of irregular black marks along each side (Kronesdtedt, 1981). The underside may have no markings, or two dark lines running down the middle and converging at the end of the abdomen, and sometimes an additional dark line running down each side (Chamberlin, 1908). The legs are light brown and, unlike some Pardosa, do not have rings. Instead, the femora have light longitudinal streaks (Kronestedt, 1981). Males (length = 6.71 +/- 0.51 mm) are only slightly shorter than females (length = 6.93 +/- 0.45 mm), and female carapace width (2.27 +/- 0.22 mm) seems to be narrower than male carapace width (2.41 +/- 0.21 mm) (Dondale & Redner, 1990). Characteristics of the male palp and the female epigynum must be used to distinguish P. modica from the other Pardosa. The palp is distinguished by its stout terminal apophysis, with the conductor situated distal to the basal margin of the apical division, and by its small median apophysis. The epigynum is distinguished by its atrium, which is about as wide as long, and by its median septum, which has a short, narrowed anterior, with the anterior margins of the cavity sclerites extending anterolaterally (Dondale & Redner, 1990).

Pardosa dorsuncata

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

SeasonalityMales are generally found from April to late August, while females are generally found between April and October. Egg sacs are produced between June and October. IdentificationFemale: Total length 5-6 mm. Cephalothorax (both dorsally and ventrally) and abdomen are generally dark brownish-grey. Stripes on carapace (medial and submarginal) are pale and wide, making it appear that the carapace is light greyish with two dark stripes. Epigynum hood is quite prominent; with a wide, shallow cavity. The median septum is thin at the anterior portion, and rounded at the posterior portion, and flat overall. There are a pair of yellowish stripes that are on either side of the pale heart mark, they merge and meet with the end of the heart mark. Sternum sometimes has mark shaped like a "V". Male: Total length 4.5 - 5 mm. Pattern is similar to female, but color is generally darker. Large, shiny sclerite on palea near base on embolus. The embolus itself is partially concealed by the median apophysis. Median apophysis has two processes: basal process is small and hooklike, while distal process is flat, curved, bumpy, and quite long. Heart mark is large and fairly vague in comparison to female. In both sexes, eastern specimens tend towards lighter coloration.

Pardosa metlakatla

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

SeasonalityMale and female adults forage from May to September (Buddle 2000), but are more common from late May to mid June (Buddle et al 2000). IdentificationPardosa mackenziana belongs to the Pardosa nigra group which is represented in Canada and Alaska by four more species (Lowrie & Dondale 1981 in Dondale & Redner 1990). Most of wolf spiders are very similar and usually differences are based on male and female sexual characters, however, size, distribution and coloration patterns usually help to differentiate some species. Carapace (dorsal portion of the head region or cephalothorax) broad, dark brown with a dorso-medial longitudinal lighter band which is constricted in its anterior third, no marginal bands present. Mouthparts: Chelicerae and fangs the same color as carapace; labium, endites slightly lighter in color with a pale anterior border. Sternum (ventral plate between legs) light brown. Femora (3rd leg segment) and tibia (5th leg segment) dusky with three inconspicuous lighter rings; patella (4th leg segment), metatarsi (6th leg segment) and tarsi (7th leg segment) brown. Abdomen with no markings, dorsally dark, lighter ventrally. Males and Females similar in coloration pattern but males smaller. Male palps (see additional picture, articulated appendages anterior to 1st pair of legs): Medial apophysis (ma in palp image) with two projections, anterior projection longer, curved and with several minute “teeth” on its tip, posterior projection smaller, rounded (rather conical); terminal apophysis (ta in palp image) slender and curved, with internal border toothed. Female epigynum (see additional picture, located in the anterior ventral side of the abdomen): Longer than wide, with two lateral dark swellings (1 in image), median septum with anterior part long and narrow (2 in image) and posterior part broader and ridged (3 in image).

Pardosa anomala

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

SeasonalityFemales found from late May – September. Males found from early May – October. Juveniles overwinter. IdentificationFemale: Total length 5-7 mm. Both cephalothorax and abdomen are primarily blackish, both dorsally and ventrally. Abdomen may have thin, light heart mark; and has several white spots. Epigynum has small hood, and has a fairly shallow cavity. The median septum is long and thin, but thickens at the posterior third to become approximately as wide at its base as the copulatory openings on either side of it. Exact ratio similar to P. sternalis, so this character cannot be used reliably where those species are interspersed. Male: Patterned similarly to female. Tibia of palpus noticeably hirsute, all palpus segments blackish save patella. Embolus long, thin, and strongly arched. Terminal apophysis with distally pointing tip; and has large, stout basal process. Median apophysis has two processes – short one at base, long curved one at tip. Tarsus on first leg is comparable to other tarsi in proportion and color, unlike some of its close relatives.

Pardosa tristis

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

SeasonalityMales collected mid-May to July, females mid-May to October, and egg sacs June to early October. IdentificationPardosa tesquorum looks similar to other Pardosa, with a dark reddish brown to black carapace that has a few radiating black lines, and pale median and submarginal bands, which are often indistinct or absent, especially anteriorly and in the male, and are thus not particularly useful characters to rely upon for identification. The sternum is dark brown to black, but sometimes has a yellow stripe down the middle at the anterior. The chelicerae are dark with pale, longitudinal streaks, and with two teeth on the retromargin of the fang furrow. (These will not be seen without a microscope.) The legs are orange with black streaks, and indistinct rings on the femora. The female has lighter legs and more distinct black rings than the male. The abdomen is almost black dorsally, but with a large pale heart mark, and a series of pale chevrons. The underside is yellow or gray, and darker toward the middle (Dondale & Redner, 1986). The female (length = 5.69 +/- 0.63 mm) is slightly longer than the male (length = 4.83 +/- 0.44 mm), with a slightly wider carapace (1.98 +/- 0.13 mm) than the male (1.83 +/- 0.15 mm). In order to distinguish P. tesquorum from other Pardosa, it is necessary to look at palpal and epigynal characteristics. The male palp is unique because of its terminal apophysis, which is broad and flat, and because of the slender curved hook on its palea. The epigynum is unique because of its median septum. This is broadest level with the copulatory openings, tapered anteriorly, and has deeply indented lateral margins of the epigynal plate (Dondale & Redner, 1986).

Pardosa ontariensis

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Pardosa saltuaria group

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Taxonomic Hierarchy for University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum