Order - Odonata

Taxonomic Hierarchy for Freshwater Invertebrate Collection


Results

56 results for "Odonata"

Aeshna eremita

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Common NameLake Darner SeasonalityJune to September in British Columbia (Paulson, 2009). IdentificationBlue or green notched stripes on lateral sides of thorax (Figure 2). Very similar in appearance to Canada Darners (A. canadensis) but different by having a larger size,a notched posterior thoracic stripe, and a black horizontal line bisecting the frons. They are easily differentiated from other congeneric species by their large sizes and their thoracic stripe pattern(Paulson, 2009).

Aeshna interrupta

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Common NameVariable Darner SeasonalityJune to October in British Columbia (Paulson, 2009). IdentificationHalf blue and half yellow stripes on lateral sides of thorax narrow or broken into spots as the scientific name suggests (see lateral image).Most other congeneric species (e.g. A. eremita and A. juncea) have more prominent and unbroken thoracic stripes (Paulson, 2009).

Aeshna juncea

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Common NameRush Darner SeasonalityJune to September in British Columbia (Paulson, 2009). IdentificationBlue and yellow stripes on lateral sides thorax are straight and broad (Figure 2). Similar in appearance to Subarctic Darners(A. subarctica) but differnt by having straight thoracic stripes (instead of slightly notched). Also somewhat similar to Variable Darners (A. interrupta) but different by having broader thoracic stripes. They are easily differentiated from other congeneric species by their thoracic stripe pattern (Paulson, 2009).

Aeshna sitchensis

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Aeshna sp.

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Aeshna umbrosa

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Amphiagrion abbreviatum

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Anax sp.

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Calopteryx aequabile

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Chromagrion sp.

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Coenagrion angulatum

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Common NamePrairie bluet SeasonalityAdults fly from late May until early August, later in the southern part of its range. IdentificationThe prairie bluet is more robust and darker blue in colour than the other Eurasian bluets (C. interrogatum and C. resolutum) found in North America (Walker 1953). Males have a distinct colour pattern on the abdomen; segments 3 to 7 are black with blue bands that become progressively smaller towards the end of the abdomen. The end of the abdomen is almost completely blue (Walker 1953, Acorn 2004). Males also have a distinctive black spot on the top of the second abdominal segment and slightly widened terminal abdominal segments (Westfall and May 1996). Female colours are usually yellow-green to tan but can be blue like the males (Westfall and May 1996). Abdominal segments 3 to 7 are dark without coloured rings and segment 8 has pale colouration on top at the base (Walker 1953, Acorn 2004). The dorsal surface immediately behind the head on females has three lobes on the posterior margin; the middle lobe projects above the other two (Walker 1953). Prairie bluets are small damselflies, rarely exceeding 3 cm in length. Larvae of the prairie bluet are difficult to distinguish from the other Eurasian bluets or even American bluets (genus Enallagma) or forktails (genus Ischnura). The prairie bluet has no obvious characters that allows for identificaion in the field. Coenagrion larvae are of average stature with the posterior margin of the head rounded and eyes not very prominent (Walker 1953).

Coenagrion cyathigerum

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Coenagrion interrogatum

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Common NameSubarctic bluet SeasonalityAdults fly late May to late July depending on latitude. IdentificationThe subarctic bluet is similar in size and proportions to the taiga bluet (C. resolutum) but has different colour patterns and markings (Walker 1953). Males have a black mark on the underside of the thorax in the shape of a Y while the taiga bluet has no markings (Westfall and May 1996). On each side of the top of the thorax are wide, broken blue strips (appear to be on their shoulders) that are wider than the black strips below (Walker 1953, Acorn 2004). Female subarctic bluets also have black markings on the underside of the thorax (Westfall and May 1996) Abdominal segments 3 to 7 have dark streaks on the underside and blue or greenish rings, segments 8 and 9 have blue or greenish areas on the dorsal surface (Walker 1953, Acorn 2004). Subarctic bluets are small damselflies, rarely exceeding 3 cm in length. Larvae of the subarctic bluet are difficult to distinguish from the other Eurasian bluets (C. angulatum and C. resolutum) or even American bluets (genus Enallagma) or forktails (genus Ischnura). The subarctic bluet has no obvious characters that allows for identification in the field; two published keys use very finely detailed characters (Baker and Clifford 1980, Canning and Canning 1980). Coenagrion larvae are of average stature with the posterior margin of the head rounded and eyes not very prominent (Walker 1953).

Coenagrion resolutum

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Common NameTaiga bluet SeasonalityAdults fly late-May to mid-August depending on the location. IdentificationThe taiga bluet has pale blue to almost turquoise colouration (Westfall and May 1996). It is similar in size and proportions to the subarctic bluet (C. interrogatum) but has different colour patterns and markings (Walker 1953). Males do not have a black mark on the underside of the thorax like that which is found on the subarctic bluet (Westfall and May 1996). On each side of the top of the thorax are narrow blue stripes (appear to be on their shoulders) that are sometimes broken and resemble an exclamation mark. These shoulder strips are narrower than the black strips below and come to point above the dot in the exclamation mark (Westfall and May 1996). Abdominal segments are mostly pale blue on top and yellowish-green on bottom with distinctive markings: segments 1 and 2 have narrow dark rings; segment 2 has a black U-shape on top with arms of the U on each side of the segment; segments 3 and 4 segments are blue at the end; half of segment 5 and segments 6 and 7 form one large black ring; segments 8 and 9 are blue and the terminal segment is black (Walker 1953, Cannings 2002, Acorn 2004). Female taiga bluets can be coloured like the males or yellow-green to brownish (Walker 1953). Females do not have a black mark on the underside of the thorax. Most of the abdomen is dark with pale rings, some in the mid-abdomen are interrupted, more prominent on the terminal segments (Walker 1953, Westfall and May 1996, Acorn 2004). ). Taiga bluets are small to medium damselflies that can be just over 3 cm in length. Larvae of the taiga bluet are difficult to distinguish from the other Eurasian bluets (C. angulatum and C. interrogatum) or even American bluets (genus Enallagma) or forktails (genus Ischnura). The taiga bluet has no obvious characters that allows for identification in the field; two published keys use very finely detailed characters (Baker and Clifford 1980, Canning and Canning 1980). Coenagrion larvae are of average stature with the posterior margin of the head rounded and eyes not very prominent (Walker 1953).

Coenagrion sp.

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Cordulia shurtleffi

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Cordulia sp.

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Enallagma anna

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Enallagma boreale

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Common Nameboreal bluet SeasonalityAdults fly from late May to mid August in Alberta. Flight season extends in more temperate regions. IdentificationA large bluet, with adults ranging from 28-36 mm in total length and 17-22 mm in hindwing length. Males are blue (andromorphic), while females are polymorphic and range from light blue to yellow-green (Forbes 1991). Males have narrow humeral stripes and a wide median stripe on the thorax. Black abdominal banding is present in both sexes. In males, the first three black bands occurring on abdominal segments 3 to 5 are typically short and similar in length throughout, however, the black bands may increase in width towards the end of the abdomen in certain northern populations. These males may also possess a large black spot on abdominal segment 2 that touches the rear margin of the segment. Male abdominal segments 6, 7 and 10 are mostly black on the dorsal surface, while segments 8 and 9 are mostly blue. Males have a black subapical bar on the abdominal segment 2 (dorsal). In females, the abdomen is mostly black on the dorsal surface, with pale basal rings on segments 3 to 8. Abdominal segment 8 in females may have more blue or light brown than other segments, and at most may fill segment. When present within abdominal segment 8, the front margin of the black band typically tapers to a point on the dorsal surface. Female abdominal segments 9 and 10 are black. Male eyes are dorsally black and ventrally blue, while female eyes are dorsally dark brown and ventrally light brown. Postocular spots are large and may form dumbbell shape in both sexes. Boreal bluets are virtually indistinguishable from northern bluets (Enallagma annexum) except when viewed under magnification. Male boreal bluets and northern bluets differ in clasper morphology (McPeek 2011). Hagen’s bluets (Enallagma hageni) and marsh bluets (Enallagma ebrium) are similar in colouration, but both are notably smaller, may have smaller postocular spots, and have a larger spot on abdominal segment 2. Familiar bluets (Enallagma civile) are also similar in appearance, however the cerci are longer than paraprocts in familiar bluets, while the opposite is true for boreal bluets (Acorn 2004; Paulsen 2009).

Enallagma cyathigerum

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Enallagma ebrium

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Common Namemarsh bluet SeasonalityAdults fly from June to August in Alberta. Flight season extends in more temperate regions. IdentificationA smaller bluet, with adults ranging from 28-34 mm in total length and 16-21 mm in hindwing length. Males are predominantly blue (andromorphic), while females are polymorphic and range from light blue to yellow-green, the former being more common. Thoracic stripes are typical of most bluets in both sexes. Black abdominal banding is present in both sexes. In males, the first three black bands occurring on abdominal segments 3 to 5 increase in width towards the end of the abdomen. Male abdominal segments 6, 7 and 10 are mostly black on the dorsal surface, segments 8 to 9 are predominantly blue. Males have a large apical spot on the dorsal surface of abdominal segment 2. In females, the abdomen is mostly black due to broadening of abdominal bands on the dorsal surface. Male eyes are dorsally black and ventrally blue, while female eyes are dorsally brown and ventrally tan to pale green. Postocular spots are prominent and rarely separated, forming a dumbbell shape in both sexes. In certain populations, abdominal banding may be wider in marsh bluets than in Hagen’s bluets (Enallagma hageni); however, over much of its range, marsh bluets are virtually indistinguishable from Hagen’s bluets except when viewed under magnification. Male marsh bluets and Hagen’s bluets differ in morphology of cerci. The large size of the mesostigmal plates, or “shoulder pads”, of female marsh bluets differentiate them from all other female bluets save Hagen’s bluets; however, the mesostigmal plates of female marsh bluets lie flat towards their posterior end, while the mesostigmal plates of female Hagen’s bluets are raised above the thorax. Compared to marsh bluets, northern bluets (Enallagma annexum), boreal bluets (Enallagma boreale), and familiar bluets (Enallagma civile) may be similar in colouration, but all 3 are notably larger (Acorn 2004; Paulsen 2009).

Taxonomic Hierarchy for Freshwater Invertebrate Collection