Order - Odonata

Taxonomic Hierarchy for Freshwater Invertebrate Collection


Results

56 results for "Odonata"

Enallagma hageni

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Common NameHagen's bluet SeasonalityAdults fly from June to August in Alberta. Flight season extends in more temperate regions. IdentificationA smaller bluet, with adults ranging from 27-33 mm in total length and 15-21 mm in hindwing length. Males are predominantly blue (andromorphic), while females are polymorphic and may be range from light blue to yellow-green to light brown. Thoracic stripes are typical of most bluets in both sexes. Black abdominal banding is present in both sexes. In males, the black bands occurring on abdominal segments 3 to 5 increase in width towards the end of the abdomen on the dorsal surface. Male abdominal segments 6, 7 and 10 are mostly black on the dorsal surface, and segments 8 and 9 are predominantly blue. Males have a prominent apical spot on the dorsal surface of abdominal segment 2. In females, the abdomen is predominantly black due to widening of abdominal bands on the dorsal surface. Male eyes are dorsally black and ventrally blue, while female eyes are dorsally brown and ventrally tan or or pale green. Postocular spots are prominent in both sexes, forming a dumbbell shape. Over much of its range, Hagen’s bluets are virtually indistinguishable from marsh bluets (Enallagma ebrium) except when viewed under magnification; however, in certain populations, abdominal banding may be narrower in Hagen’s bluets than in marsh bluets. Male Hagen’s bluets and marsh bluets differ in morphology of cerci. The large size of the mesostigmal plates, or “shoulder pads”, of female marsh bluets differentiate them from all other female bluets except Hagen’s bluets; however, the mesostigmal plates of female Hagen’s bluets are raised above the thorax, while the mesostigmal plates of female marsh bluets lie flat towards their posterior end. Female Hagen’s bluets may also resemble female taiga bluets (Coenagrion resolutum), but may be differentiated by the presence of a spine on the ventral side of abdominal segment 8 in Hagen’s bluets. Northern bluets (Enallagma annexum), boreal bluets (Enallagma boreale), and familiar bluets (Enallagma civile) may be similar in colouration in both sexes, but all 3 are notably larger (Acorn 2004; Paulsen 2009).

Enallagma sp.

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Epitheca sp.

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Gomphus notatus

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Gomphus sp.

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Ischnura cervula

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Ischnura perparva

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Ischnura sp.

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Lestes congener

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Common NameSpotted spreadwing SeasonalityLate summer, mid July to early October (Walker). IdentificationThorax blackish-bronze above, yellowish below, with clear wings. Two dark spots are found on the metepimeron. Male: 34-36 mm long, up to 42 mm in some populations. Inferior appendages less than half the length of superior appendages. Pruinosity develops with age at wing base and abdomen (segments 1,2, 8, 9 and 10). Female: 32-34 mm long, up to 39 mm in some populations. Pruinosity develops with age on the pterothorax and wing base.

Lestes disjunctus

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Lestes dryas

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Common NameEmerald Spreadwing; Scarce Emerald Damselfly SeasonalityEarly summer, mid-June to late August (Walker). IdentificationThe only Lestes in Alberta with bright metallic green upperparts. Male: 36-38 mm long. Metallic green on upper thorax, humeral stripe very thin or absent. Inferior appendages very broad at the tips in lateral view. Pruinosity develops with age to cover the pronotum, parts of the thorax, and segments 8-10. Female: 27-29 mm long. Metallic green above, humeral stripe thin, green of the mesepimeron extending onto the mesinfraepisternum. Does not develop pruinosity. (Walker)

Lestes sp.

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Lestes unquiculatus

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Leucorrhinia hudsonica

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Common NameHudsonian Whiteface SeasonalityMay to August. IdentificationThe Hudsonian Whiteface has a length of 27 to 30 mm. Male dragonflies are black and marked with red on the thorax and the abdomen with pointed spots on one end that form a line in the top side of the abdomen. The female is a dark brownish color and marked similarly to the male except the markings are yellow instead of black. Both sexes have creamy white faces. The naiad of the Hudsonian Whiteface has a length of 16 to 18 mm. Its abdomen is rounded, which gives it a short, stocky appearance known as the sprawler form. Naiads are brown with three dark stripes marking the length below the abdomen. In some cases, there are tiny hooks on abdominal segments three through six. Every side of abdominal segments eight and nine has a spine that points out away from the abdomen.

Leucorrhinia intacta

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Common NameDot-tailed Whiteface SeasonalitySpring through summer. IdentificationMales have white faces and a single yellow dorsal dot on the 7th segment of the abdomen. The immature has a yellow marking on the thorax. The female has yellow markings on the abdomen with the same prominent, square dorsal spot on the 7th segment, which is often truncated into a trapezoid. The body varies from 1.1 to 1.3 inches in length. Larvae possess conspicuous epi-cranial protuberances on the frons or vertex.

Leucorrhinia proxima

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Leucorrhinia sp.

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Libellula quadrimaculata

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Libellula sp.

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Nehalennia irene

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Common NameSedge sprite SeasonalityAdult flight time varies across the range but can emerge as early as May and has been recorded as late as September. IdentificationSedge sprites are among the smallest of all damselfly species with slender abdomens and a total length less than 3 cm (Westfall and May 1996). Generally, they are metallic green with no post-ocular spots (pale-coloured markings just behind eyes, characteristic of many damselflies) (Walker 1953). Male sedge sprites are fairly easy to recognize due to the blue colour of the terminal two and a half abdominal segments with paired dark spots on the terminal two segments (Walker 1953). Females are very similar to males but the two terminal abdominal segments are each dark with a blue band (Westfall and May 1996). Females exhibit two colour and pattern morphs, one similar to the male and one with green and yellow colouration (Lajeunesse and Forbes 2003). The sedge sprite is of similar size and colouration to some species from the forktail genus (Ischnura) but differ in that forktails have obvious postocular spots (Acorn 2004). Larvae, like the adults, are small and slender. They are green or brown and have no obvious markings (Walker 1953). Identifying characters include spots on and below the margins of the gills and a dozen small spines on each side of the head towards the back (Westfall and May 1996). They are found at the base of dense, aquatic vegetation in habitats where adults fly (Westfall and May 1996). At the genus level, sprite larvae have one prominent (sometimes a second, but never none) bristle on either side of the upper lip just above the mandibles; although this character separates them from forktails it is not particular to sprites (De Marmels 1984).

Neurocordulia sp.

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Taxonomic Hierarchy for Freshwater Invertebrate Collection