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IN1100 - Bezzia sp.

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Place CollectedCanada: Alberta, Wabamun Creek Collected ByRetallack, J. T. Date Collected1970-10-14

IN1102 - Palpomyia sp.

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Place CollectedCanada: Alberta, Sounding Creek Collected ByAnholt, B. Date Collected1977-10-12

IN1103 - Dasyhelea sp.

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Place CollectedCanada: Alberta, Brooks Collected ByHamilton, H. R. Date Collected1973-10-14

IN1104 - Pentaneura sp.

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Place CollectedCanada: Alberta, Amisk Creek Collected ByRetallack, J. T. Date Collected1970-09-19

IN1105 - Pentaneura sp.

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Place CollectedCanada: Alberta, Fickle Lake Collected ByRetallack, J. T. Date Collected1970-10-17

IN1106 - Anatopynia sp.

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Place CollectedCanada: Alberta, Redwater Collected ByRetallack, J. T. Date Collected1970-10-04

IN1107 - Procladius sp.

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Place CollectedCanada: Alberta, Hay Lakes Collected ByHamilton, H. R. Date Collected1973-10-06

IN1108 - undetermined (Chironomidae)

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Place CollectedCanada: Alberta, Beaver Lake (Undet.) Collected ByPinsent, M. E. Date Collected1965-06-15

IN1109 - undetermined (Chironomidae)

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Place CollectedCanada: Alberta Date Collected1967-08-30

IN111 - Helobdella stagnalis

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Place CollectedCanada: Alberta, Danard Lake Collected ByWalsh, R. Date Collected1970-10-18

IN1110 - undetermined (Chironomidae)

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Place CollectedCanada: Alberta, Luscar Collected ByBergstrom, Glen Date Collected1977-09

IN1111 - undetermined (Chironomidae)

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Place CollectedCanada: Alberta, Bigoray River Collected ByHayden, W. Date Collected1968-11-08

IN1112 - undetermined (Chironomidae)

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Place CollectedCanada: Alberta, Bigoray River Collected ByHayden, W. Date Collected1968-11-15

IN1113 - undetermined (Chironomidae)

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Place CollectedCanada: Alberta, Bigoray River Collected ByHayden, W. Date Collected1968-12-08

IN1114 - undetermined (Chironomidae)

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Place CollectedCanada: Alberta, Bigoray River Collected ByHayden, W. Date Collected1969-03-30

IN1115 - undetermined (Chironomidae)

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Place CollectedCanada: Alberta, Bigoray River Collected ByHayden, W. Date Collected1969-04-18

IN1116 - undetermined (Chironomidae)

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Place CollectedCanada: Alberta, Bigoray River Collected ByHayden, W. Date Collected1969-05-03

IN1117 - undetermined (Chironomidae)

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Place CollectedCanada: Alberta, Bigoray River Collected ByHayden, W. Date Collected1969-05-18

IN1118 - undetermined (Chironomidae)

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Place CollectedCanada: Alberta, Bigoray River Collected ByHayden, W. Date Collected1969-06-12

IN1119 - undetermined (Chironomidae)

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Place CollectedCanada: Alberta, Wabamun Lake Collected ByHorkan, K. Date Collected1968-08-06

IN112 - Helobdella stagnalis

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Place CollectedCanada: Alberta, Sturgeon River Collected ByRetallack, J. T. Date Collected1970-09-22

IN1100 - Bezzia sp.

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Place CollectedCanada: Alberta, Wabamun Creek Collected ByRetallack, J. T. Date Collected1970-10-14

IN1102 - Palpomyia sp.

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Place CollectedCanada: Alberta, Sounding Creek Collected ByAnholt, B. Date Collected1977-10-12

IN1103 - Dasyhelea sp.

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Place CollectedCanada: Alberta, Brooks Collected ByHamilton, H. R. Date Collected1973-10-14

IN1104 - Pentaneura sp.

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Place CollectedCanada: Alberta, Amisk Creek Collected ByRetallack, J. T. Date Collected1970-09-19

IN1105 - Pentaneura sp.

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Place CollectedCanada: Alberta, Fickle Lake Collected ByRetallack, J. T. Date Collected1970-10-17

IN1106 - Anatopynia sp.

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Place CollectedCanada: Alberta, Redwater Collected ByRetallack, J. T. Date Collected1970-10-04

IN1107 - Procladius sp.

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Place CollectedCanada: Alberta, Hay Lakes Collected ByHamilton, H. R. Date Collected1973-10-06

IN1108 - undetermined (Chironomidae)

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Place CollectedCanada: Alberta, Beaver Lake (Undet.) Collected ByPinsent, M. E. Date Collected1965-06-15

IN1109 - undetermined (Chironomidae)

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Place CollectedCanada: Alberta Date Collected1967-08-30

IN111 - Helobdella stagnalis

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Place CollectedCanada: Alberta, Danard Lake Collected ByWalsh, R. Date Collected1970-10-18

IN1110 - undetermined (Chironomidae)

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Place CollectedCanada: Alberta, Luscar Collected ByBergstrom, Glen Date Collected1977-09

IN1111 - undetermined (Chironomidae)

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Place CollectedCanada: Alberta, Bigoray River Collected ByHayden, W. Date Collected1968-11-08

IN1112 - undetermined (Chironomidae)

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Place CollectedCanada: Alberta, Bigoray River Collected ByHayden, W. Date Collected1968-11-15

IN1113 - undetermined (Chironomidae)

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Place CollectedCanada: Alberta, Bigoray River Collected ByHayden, W. Date Collected1968-12-08

IN1114 - undetermined (Chironomidae)

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Place CollectedCanada: Alberta, Bigoray River Collected ByHayden, W. Date Collected1969-03-30

IN1115 - undetermined (Chironomidae)

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Place CollectedCanada: Alberta, Bigoray River Collected ByHayden, W. Date Collected1969-04-18

IN1116 - undetermined (Chironomidae)

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Place CollectedCanada: Alberta, Bigoray River Collected ByHayden, W. Date Collected1969-05-03

IN1117 - undetermined (Chironomidae)

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Place CollectedCanada: Alberta, Bigoray River Collected ByHayden, W. Date Collected1969-05-18

IN1118 - undetermined (Chironomidae)

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Place CollectedCanada: Alberta, Bigoray River Collected ByHayden, W. Date Collected1969-06-12

IN1119 - undetermined (Chironomidae)

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Place CollectedCanada: Alberta, Wabamun Lake Collected ByHorkan, K. Date Collected1968-08-06

IN112 - Helobdella stagnalis

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Place CollectedCanada: Alberta, Sturgeon River Collected ByRetallack, J. T. Date Collected1970-09-22

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692 results in 1 collection

Neoscutopterus sp.

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Neotrichia sp.

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Nephelopsis sp.

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Neureclipsis sp.

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Neurocordulia sp.

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Notholca squamulus

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Notonecta kirbyi

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

SeasonalityBivoltine, adults over-winter laying eggs in spring and summer. Poorly documented life history. IdentificationWithin Alberta there are two other species which may be confused with Notonecta kirbyi: N. borealis and N. undulata. Of these, N. borealis occurs only in the boreal region and N. undulata is found across all of North America (Brooks and Kelton 1967, Hungerford 1917). As an adult N. kirbyi is the largest of the Alberta Notonectids (12-15 mm). Notonecta borealis may be differentiated from N. kirbyi by its white head, scutellum and hemelytra. As there is a great deal of variation in N. undulata it may be difficult to tell it apart from N. kirbyi by colouration. The head to propleuron of N. kirbyi is greenish yellow and the scutellum is always black, whereas N. undulata may be variable colours including yellow, green and has a black scutellum. Brooks and Kelton (1967) use morphological differences in eye colouration and the space between the eyes at the vertex of the head to distinguish very similar-looking individuals. Notonecta kirbyi's eyes are red, and the space between them at the vertex is about one half the distance of the distance between the perimeter of the eyes at the frons. Notonecta undulata's eyes are black. The distance between its eyes at the vertex is less than one half of the total distance between the perimeters of the eyes at the frons. Keel hairiness always reliably tells the difference between the two species under a dissecting microscope. Notonecta kirbyi has a bare keel on the fourth abdominal sternite that is hairy on both sides (Brooks and Kelton 1967). Notonecta undulata has a line of hair on the fourth abdominal sclerite keel (Brooks and Kelton 1967). The most distinguishing feature of N. kirbyi are its large, cloudy bands stretching across the leathery section of the hemelytra (from the inner edge of the clavus to the outer costal margin). Notonecta kirbyi is synonymous with N. insulata (Uhler), N. insulata var. impressa, N. (Paranecta) kirbyi (Henry and Froeshner 1988).

Notonecta sp.

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Notonecta undulata

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

SeasonalityTwo broods per year, mid-May and July. Those hibernating can live through next August. IdentificationNotonecta undulata (10-12 mm) is the smallest, most elegant of the adult Albertan notonectids (10-12 mm), and is pale rather than all white (Brooks and Kelton 1967). The black scutellum, occasionally with light spots at the apex, and pale hemelytra blend in with the sky when seen from below. The ventral surface is dark, blending in with the sediments when seen from above. Using a microscope or powerful hand-lens, one can see its hairy central keel on the underside of the fourth abdominal sclerite. This differentiates N. undulata from the two other Albertan notonectids, N. kirbyi and N. borealis (Brooks and Kelton 1967). In the boreal region only one species, N. borealis may be confused with N. undulata. Notonecta borealis is a larger (12-14 mm) and predominantly white species, not pale yellow or light green. Other than its smaller size and thinness, brown anterior femurs differentiate N. undulata from N. borealis, which has brown coxae in addition to femurs brown on the ventral-side (Brooks and Kelton 1967). South of the Edmonton region in the Alberta prairie zones, N. kirbyi can be differentiated by size alone. It is the largest species in Canada (12-15 mm). The hemelytra of N. kirbyi are also distinctive: hemelytra membranes are black at the anterior portion but fades clear towards the tip and there are broad, cloud-like bars which stretch across the clavus to the cuneus. Alternatively, N. undulata wing membranes are pale with a large, irregular spot on the median line (Brooks and Kelton 1967). The only Albertan species of Anisopinae, Buenoa confusa, can be diffentiated from all Notonectinae by its three segmented beak and antennae, smaller size (5-8mm) and shininess (Hungerford 1917 a, b, Brooks and Kelton 1967). Notonecta undulata is synonymous with N. punctata Say, N. (Paranecta) undulata, and N. undulata var. charon Kirkaldy (Henry and Froeshner 1988).

Nymphula sp.

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Ochrotrichia sp.

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Oculobdella lucida

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Oecetis avara

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

SeasonalityIn Illinois, adults can be found from June to early September. IdentificationAdults are straw yellow to light brown. Forewings have numerous dark spots in the membrane. Male claspers are large, vertical and pinched at half length, with the distal half roughly semi-circular (Ross, 1944).

Oecetis sp.

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Oligophlebodes sp.

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Onocosmoecus sp.

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Ophiogomphus colubrinus

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Common NameBoreal Snaketail SeasonalityFlying from early May to late August or early September (Needham et. al., 1955). IdentificationColoration is dominantly green on the head, eyes and thorax, with a black outline around the labrum and facial sutures as well as black lateral stripes on thorax. Eyes do not meet dorsally on the head. The anterior thoracic strip is divided by a narrow green line seen in many other Ophiogomphus species. Legs are entirely black, except for trace green markings on the femora and tibia of females. The abdomen is primarily black with interrupted dorsal and lateral stripes that appear bright yellow and noticeably widen on enlarged segments 7, 8 and 9 and continue on to the caudal appendages of males. Length of the abdomen can vary up to 10mm between individuals. Unlike most other species, male boreal snaketails have small dark coloured horns on their head similar to females; however, females of this species have two pairs of horns, one in front and one behind the eye (Needham et. al. 2000).

Ophiogomphus severus

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Common NamePale Snaketail SeasonalityAdults have a flight season occurring from May to September. IdentificationColoration of Ophiogomphus severus is similar to its close relatives, except that O. severus has a larger proportion of black across the entire body. The head and eyes are yellow with a black line across the frons and a black vertex. Eyes do not meet dorsally. Thorax is more greenish yellow than the head and abdomen with a diagnostic dark brown oval on the prothorax. Both the forewings and the hindwings have a yellow costal vein, but dark venation color throughout the rest of the wing. Leg segments show a mottled color pattern, the leg base yellow, the tarsi black and the femur and tibia displaying both colours. Abdomen is primarily yellow and black. Lateral stripes are continuous from the first to the terminal abdominal segment while the dorsal stripe is arranged as a row of large yellow spots ending on the ninth segment. Caudal appendages are also entirely yellow. Males and females of this species look very similar, but can be differentiated by more color on the legs of the female (Needham, et al 2000).

This species is divided into two subspecies: Ophiogomphus severus severus Hagen (described above) and Ophiogomphus severus montanus Selys which is described as having a larger lateral brown spot on the prothoracic segment and more black on segment 10 of the abdomen (Needham, et. al. 2000).

Ophiogomphus sp.

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Ophryoxus gracilis

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Orconectes virilis

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Neoscutopterus sp.

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Neotrichia sp.

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Nephelopsis sp.

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Neureclipsis sp.

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Neurocordulia sp.

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Notholca squamulus

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Notonecta kirbyi

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

SeasonalityBivoltine, adults over-winter laying eggs in spring and summer. Poorly documented life history. IdentificationWithin Alberta there are two other species which may be confused with Notonecta kirbyi: N. borealis and N. undulata. Of these, N. borealis occurs only in the boreal region and N. undulata is found across all of North America (Brooks and Kelton 1967, Hungerford 1917). As an adult N. kirbyi is the largest of the Alberta Notonectids (12-15 mm). Notonecta borealis may be differentiated from N. kirbyi by its white head, scutellum and hemelytra. As there is a great deal of variation in N. undulata it may be difficult to tell it apart from N. kirbyi by colouration. The head to propleuron of N. kirbyi is greenish yellow and the scutellum is always black, whereas N. undulata may be variable colours including yellow, green and has a black scutellum. Brooks and Kelton (1967) use morphological differences in eye colouration and the space between the eyes at the vertex of the head to distinguish very similar-looking individuals. Notonecta kirbyi's eyes are red, and the space between them at the vertex is about one half the distance of the distance between the perimeter of the eyes at the frons. Notonecta undulata's eyes are black. The distance between its eyes at the vertex is less than one half of the total distance between the perimeters of the eyes at the frons. Keel hairiness always reliably tells the difference between the two species under a dissecting microscope. Notonecta kirbyi has a bare keel on the fourth abdominal sternite that is hairy on both sides (Brooks and Kelton 1967). Notonecta undulata has a line of hair on the fourth abdominal sclerite keel (Brooks and Kelton 1967). The most distinguishing feature of N. kirbyi are its large, cloudy bands stretching across the leathery section of the hemelytra (from the inner edge of the clavus to the outer costal margin). Notonecta kirbyi is synonymous with N. insulata (Uhler), N. insulata var. impressa, N. (Paranecta) kirbyi (Henry and Froeshner 1988).

Notonecta sp.

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Notonecta undulata

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

SeasonalityTwo broods per year, mid-May and July. Those hibernating can live through next August. IdentificationNotonecta undulata (10-12 mm) is the smallest, most elegant of the adult Albertan notonectids (10-12 mm), and is pale rather than all white (Brooks and Kelton 1967). The black scutellum, occasionally with light spots at the apex, and pale hemelytra blend in with the sky when seen from below. The ventral surface is dark, blending in with the sediments when seen from above. Using a microscope or powerful hand-lens, one can see its hairy central keel on the underside of the fourth abdominal sclerite. This differentiates N. undulata from the two other Albertan notonectids, N. kirbyi and N. borealis (Brooks and Kelton 1967). In the boreal region only one species, N. borealis may be confused with N. undulata. Notonecta borealis is a larger (12-14 mm) and predominantly white species, not pale yellow or light green. Other than its smaller size and thinness, brown anterior femurs differentiate N. undulata from N. borealis, which has brown coxae in addition to femurs brown on the ventral-side (Brooks and Kelton 1967). South of the Edmonton region in the Alberta prairie zones, N. kirbyi can be differentiated by size alone. It is the largest species in Canada (12-15 mm). The hemelytra of N. kirbyi are also distinctive: hemelytra membranes are black at the anterior portion but fades clear towards the tip and there are broad, cloud-like bars which stretch across the clavus to the cuneus. Alternatively, N. undulata wing membranes are pale with a large, irregular spot on the median line (Brooks and Kelton 1967). The only Albertan species of Anisopinae, Buenoa confusa, can be diffentiated from all Notonectinae by its three segmented beak and antennae, smaller size (5-8mm) and shininess (Hungerford 1917 a, b, Brooks and Kelton 1967). Notonecta undulata is synonymous with N. punctata Say, N. (Paranecta) undulata, and N. undulata var. charon Kirkaldy (Henry and Froeshner 1988).

Nymphula sp.

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Ochrotrichia sp.

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Oculobdella lucida

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Oecetis avara

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

SeasonalityIn Illinois, adults can be found from June to early September. IdentificationAdults are straw yellow to light brown. Forewings have numerous dark spots in the membrane. Male claspers are large, vertical and pinched at half length, with the distal half roughly semi-circular (Ross, 1944).

Oecetis sp.

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Oligophlebodes sp.

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Onocosmoecus sp.

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Ophiogomphus colubrinus

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Common NameBoreal Snaketail SeasonalityFlying from early May to late August or early September (Needham et. al., 1955). IdentificationColoration is dominantly green on the head, eyes and thorax, with a black outline around the labrum and facial sutures as well as black lateral stripes on thorax. Eyes do not meet dorsally on the head. The anterior thoracic strip is divided by a narrow green line seen in many other Ophiogomphus species. Legs are entirely black, except for trace green markings on the femora and tibia of females. The abdomen is primarily black with interrupted dorsal and lateral stripes that appear bright yellow and noticeably widen on enlarged segments 7, 8 and 9 and continue on to the caudal appendages of males. Length of the abdomen can vary up to 10mm between individuals. Unlike most other species, male boreal snaketails have small dark coloured horns on their head similar to females; however, females of this species have two pairs of horns, one in front and one behind the eye (Needham et. al. 2000).

Ophiogomphus severus

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Common NamePale Snaketail SeasonalityAdults have a flight season occurring from May to September. IdentificationColoration of Ophiogomphus severus is similar to its close relatives, except that O. severus has a larger proportion of black across the entire body. The head and eyes are yellow with a black line across the frons and a black vertex. Eyes do not meet dorsally. Thorax is more greenish yellow than the head and abdomen with a diagnostic dark brown oval on the prothorax. Both the forewings and the hindwings have a yellow costal vein, but dark venation color throughout the rest of the wing. Leg segments show a mottled color pattern, the leg base yellow, the tarsi black and the femur and tibia displaying both colours. Abdomen is primarily yellow and black. Lateral stripes are continuous from the first to the terminal abdominal segment while the dorsal stripe is arranged as a row of large yellow spots ending on the ninth segment. Caudal appendages are also entirely yellow. Males and females of this species look very similar, but can be differentiated by more color on the legs of the female (Needham, et al 2000).

This species is divided into two subspecies: Ophiogomphus severus severus Hagen (described above) and Ophiogomphus severus montanus Selys which is described as having a larger lateral brown spot on the prothoracic segment and more black on segment 10 of the abdomen (Needham, et. al. 2000).

Ophiogomphus sp.

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Ophryoxus gracilis

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection

Orconectes virilis

Freshwater Invertebrate Collection