Species Details

Phalaenostola metonalis

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum Read more about this collection »

Common NameTufted Snout. SeasonalityAdults are on the wing from early July to August. IdentificationA small (2.0-2.4 cm wingspan), broad-winged fragile little moth. The forewings are light grey-brown, darkening slightly toward the outer margin, and with the curved darker brown antemedian and postmedian lines. The hindwings are a bit lighter, especially in the basal half, with the two lines of the forewing continuing across them, but not as clearly marked. The reniform is usually indicated by a short brown bar or crescent. The male antennae are broadly bipectinate (female's are simple), the palps are very long (as long as the head and thorax combined), and flattened laterally. P. hanhami is much darker chocolate brown, and better marked. The feathery antennae in the male will separate them from most similar species (i.e. Zanclognatha). Easily mistaken for small geometrid moths.

Scientific Name Phalaenostola metonalis Common Name Tufted Snout. Seasonality Adults are on the wing from early July to August. Identification
A small (2.0-2.4 cm wingspan), broad-winged fragile little moth. The forewings are light grey-brown, darkening slightly toward the outer margin, and with the curved darker brown antemedian and postmedian lines. The…
A small (2.0-2.4 cm wingspan), broad-winged fragile little moth. The forewings are light grey-brown, darkening slightly toward the outer margin, and with the curved darker brown antemedian and postmedian lines. The hindwings are a bit lighter, especially in the basal half, with the two lines of the forewing continuing across them, but not as clearly marked. The reniform is usually indicated by a short brown bar or crescent. The male antennae are broadly bipectinate (female's are simple), the palps are very long (as long as the head and thorax combined), and flattened laterally. P. hanhami is much darker chocolate brown, and better marked. The feathery antennae in the male will separate them from most similar species (i.e. Zanclognatha). Easily mistaken for small geometrid moths.
Life History Adults are nocturnal and come to light. Conservation A widespread and fairly common species. No concerns. Diet Info No Alberta data. Elsewhere reported to feed on dead grass and dead leaves of deciduous trees; also on lettuce and dandelion leaves (in lab ?). Range
Nova Scotia and Quebec, west across Canada to Vancouver, south to North Carolina and Tennessee. In Alberta, it has been taken across the Aspen Parklands and southern Boreal Forest, as well as in the foothills and at…
Nova Scotia and Quebec, west across Canada to Vancouver, south to North Carolina and Tennessee. In Alberta, it has been taken across the Aspen Parklands and southern Boreal Forest, as well as in the foothills and at low elevations in the mountains.

Citation

Page Citation for Phalaenostola metonalis

Page Citation

"Phalaenostola metonalis, University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum." University of Alberta Museums Search Site, https://search.museums.ualberta.ca/g/2-905. Accessed 25 Jul. 2021.

Taxonomic Hierarchy

Kingdom Animalia Phylum Arthropoda Class Hexapoda Subclass Insecta Order Lepidoptera Suborder Ditrysia Superfamily Noctuoidea Family Noctuidae Subfamily Herminiinae Genus Phalaenostola Species Phalaenostola metonalis
This hierarchy is created from our museum records, it may not always accurately reflect modern taxonomies.

Taxonomic Hierarchy for University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum