Species Details

Catocala praeclara

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum Read more about this collection »

Common NamePraeclara Underwing SeasonalityAdults have been collected in mid-August and early September. IdentificationA medium-size ( 3.8-5.0 cm wingspan) moth with dull greenish or purple grey forewings. The antemedial line is black and distinct, the other cross-lines less so, mainly indicated by dark marks at the costa. The basal dash is indistinct or absent. A short dark dash in the outer fold, with some dark red-brown scaling adjacent. The hindwings are bright yellow-orange, with a median black band that forms a long loop with the basal streak. A wider black terminal band, divided or nearly so in the anal area, forming a dark, anal spot. The antennae are simple and both the sexes are alike. It can only be mistaken with Catocala blandula, which has much more mottled grey, black and whitish forewings. Canadian populations, which are darker and duller than more southern ones, were previously treated as a separate species, Catocala manitoba Beut.

Scientific Name Catocala praeclara Common Name Praeclara Underwing Habitat Dry shrub stands in the valleys of the grassland region. Seasonality Adults have been collected in mid-August and early September. Identification
A medium-size ( 3.8-5.0 cm wingspan) moth with dull greenish or purple grey forewings. The antemedial line is black and distinct, the other cross-lines less so, mainly indicated by dark marks at the costa. The basal…
A medium-size ( 3.8-5.0 cm wingspan) moth with dull greenish or purple grey forewings. The antemedial line is black and distinct, the other cross-lines less so, mainly indicated by dark marks at the costa. The basal dash is indistinct or absent. A short dark dash in the outer fold, with some dark red-brown scaling adjacent. The hindwings are bright yellow-orange, with a median black band that forms a long loop with the basal streak. A wider black terminal band, divided or nearly so in the anal area, forming a dark, anal spot. The antennae are simple and both the sexes are alike. It can only be mistaken with Catocala blandula, which has much more mottled grey, black and whitish forewings. Canadian populations, which are darker and duller than more southern ones, were previously treated as a separate species, Catocala manitoba Beut.
Life History Adults are nocturnal and come to light and probably sugar baits (no data). Larvae are solitary defoliators and the egg is the overwintering stage. There is a single annual brood. Conservation At the edge of its range, where suitable habitat appears to be secure. No concerns. Diet Info No Alberta data; elsewhere reported from Aronia and Prunus (Rosaceae). In Alberta, chokecherry is the probable host. Range
Primarily eastern, from Nova Scotia west to southeastern Alberta, south to Florida and Kansas. In Alberta it has been collected twice in the badlands of the Red Deer River, at Dinosaur Provincial Park and at Tolman…
Primarily eastern, from Nova Scotia west to southeastern Alberta, south to Florida and Kansas. In Alberta it has been collected twice in the badlands of the Red Deer River, at Dinosaur Provincial Park and at Tolman Bridge Recreational Area, east of Trochu.

Citation

Page Citation for Catocala praeclara

Page Citation

"Catocala praeclara, University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum." University of Alberta Museums Search Site, https://search.museums.ualberta.ca/g/2-810. Accessed 16 Oct. 2021.

Taxonomic Hierarchy

Kingdom Animalia Phylum Arthropoda Class Hexapoda Subclass Insecta Order Lepidoptera Suborder Ditrysia Superfamily Noctuoidea Family Noctuidae Subfamily Catocalinae Genus Catocala Species Catocala praeclara
This hierarchy is created from our museum records, it may not always accurately reflect modern taxonomies.

Taxonomic Hierarchy for University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum