Species Details

Catocala parta

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum Read more about this collection »

Common NameMother Underwing SeasonalityAdults have been captured between mid-August and mid-September. IdentificationOne of the largest underwing moths found in Alberta (7.0 -7.8 cm wingspan). The forewings are pale grey, mottled with darker grey and whitish patches. There are poorly defined but noticeable black streaks at the wing base, in the fold and in the sub-apical area. The area just inside the reniform spot is white, and the space immediately below the reniform forms a large, rather prominent squared white spot. A third pale area is located midway down the subterminal band. The hindwings are salmon or orange-pink, crossed by a rather narrow and cleanly defined black median band. There is a wide black terminal band bordered by a narrow and somewhat scalloped orange-white fringe. Adults are alike, and both sexes have simple antennae. The large size, patchy looking grey forwings and salmon-colored hindwings will help to identify parta.

Scientific Name Catocala parta Common Name Mother Underwing Habitat Riparian cottonwood forests and urban plantings in the grassland region. Seasonality Adults have been captured between mid-August and mid-September. Identification
One of the largest underwing moths found in Alberta (7.0 -7.8 cm wingspan). The forewings are pale grey, mottled with darker grey and whitish patches. There are poorly defined but noticeable black streaks at the wing…
One of the largest underwing moths found in Alberta (7.0 -7.8 cm wingspan). The forewings are pale grey, mottled with darker grey and whitish patches. There are poorly defined but noticeable black streaks at the wing base, in the fold and in the sub-apical area. The area just inside the reniform spot is white, and the space immediately below the reniform forms a large, rather prominent squared white spot. A third pale area is located midway down the subterminal band. The hindwings are salmon or orange-pink, crossed by a rather narrow and cleanly defined black median band. There is a wide black terminal band bordered by a narrow and somewhat scalloped orange-white fringe. Adults are alike, and both sexes have simple antennae. The large size, patchy looking grey forwings and salmon-colored hindwings will help to identify parta.
Life History
Adults are nocturnal and come to light, but they are best collected using sugar baits. The adults emerge in late summer and early fall, and the eggs overwinter. The larvae, which are solitary defoliators, hatch in…
Adults are nocturnal and come to light, but they are best collected using sugar baits. The adults emerge in late summer and early fall, and the eggs overwinter. The larvae, which are solitary defoliators, hatch in May and can be found until early August. There is a single brood each year.
Conservation Possibly dependent the cottonwood and tree willow stands along the southern river valleys. Diet Info No Alberta data. Elsewhere reported to use willows (Salix sp.), cottonwood and other poplars (Populus sp.). Range
Nova Scotia south to Maryland and Kentucky, west to southern Saskatchewan and Alberta, western Montana and Utah. In western Canada, it appears to be restricted to the wooded parts of the prairies. In Alberta, it has…
Nova Scotia south to Maryland and Kentucky, west to southern Saskatchewan and Alberta, western Montana and Utah. In western Canada, it appears to be restricted to the wooded parts of the prairies. In Alberta, it has been collected in the arid grasslands region, north to Dinosaur Provincial Park.

Citation

Page Citation for Catocala parta

Page Citation

"Catocala parta, University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum." University of Alberta Museums Search Site, https://search.museums.ualberta.ca/g/2-809. Accessed 27 Oct. 2021.

Taxonomic Hierarchy

Kingdom Animalia Phylum Arthropoda Class Hexapoda Subclass Insecta Order Lepidoptera Suborder Ditrysia Superfamily Noctuoidea Family Noctuidae Subfamily Catocalinae Genus Catocala Species Catocala parta
This hierarchy is created from our museum records, it may not always accurately reflect modern taxonomies.

Taxonomic Hierarchy for University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum