Species Details

Ypsolopha falciferella

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum Read more about this collection »

SeasonalityAdults fly from June to beginning of October, reaching their peak flight in July. Specimens are generally attracted to light. IdentificationHead and antennae silvery grey, labial palpi porrect, heavily scaled, silvery grey. Thorax and legs silvery grey. Forewings hooked, typical of the genus. Dorsal surface of forewings silvery grey with slight brownish pigmentation. A large golden area is present anteriorly, but does not reach the apex. Some specimens have darker forewings with two faint, thick oblique bands extending from the anterior to the posterior wing margin. Hindwings are grey to light brown, becoming somewhat translucent basally. Ventral wing surfaces, legs and abdomen silvery grey. This is a very distinctive species that cannot be easily confused with the other Alberta species.

Scientific Name Ypsolopha falciferella Seasonality Adults fly from June to beginning of October, reaching their peak flight in July. Specimens are generally attracted to light. Identification
Head and antennae silvery grey, labial palpi porrect, heavily scaled, silvery grey. Thorax and legs silvery grey. Forewings hooked, typical of the genus. Dorsal surface of forewings silvery grey with slight brownish…
Head and antennae silvery grey, labial palpi porrect, heavily scaled, silvery grey. Thorax and legs silvery grey. Forewings hooked, typical of the genus. Dorsal surface of forewings silvery grey with slight brownish pigmentation. A large golden area is present anteriorly, but does not reach the apex. Some specimens have darker forewings with two faint, thick oblique bands extending from the anterior to the posterior wing margin. Hindwings are grey to light brown, becoming somewhat translucent basally. Ventral wing surfaces, legs and abdomen silvery grey. This is a very distinctive species that cannot be easily confused with the other Alberta species.
Life History Unknown. Pupation takes place in elongated silken cocoons. Adults of this species are among the earliest fliers, even before the snow has melted, having been captured as early as the end of April (pers. obs.). Conservation Not of concern. This native species can become locally abundant, but never in big enough numbers to cause any observable damage to host plant. Diet Info Chokecherry (Prunus virginiana). Range
A widespread species occurring throughout much of North America, including BC (Scudder & Cannings 2007), Alberta (Bowman 1951), Manitoba (Hargrave Lake, forest insect survey), Saskatchewan (Indian Head, forest insect…
A widespread species occurring throughout much of North America, including BC (Scudder & Cannings 2007), Alberta (Bowman 1951), Manitoba (Hargrave Lake, forest insect survey), Saskatchewan (Indian Head, forest insect survey), Michigan (Nielsen 1998) and Maryland (Line, L., web reference).
Ypsolopha falciferella
Ypsolopha falciferella

Citation

Page Citation for Ypsolopha falciferella

Page Citation

"Ypsolopha falciferella, University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum." University of Alberta Museums Search Site, https://search.museums.ualberta.ca/g/2-6416. Accessed 25 Jul. 2021.

Taxonomic Hierarchy

Kingdom Animalia Phylum Arthropoda Class Hexapoda Subclass Insecta Order Lepidoptera Suborder Ditrysia Superfamily Yponomeutoidea Family Ypsolophidae Subfamily Ypsolophinae Genus Ypsolopha Species Ypsolopha falciferella
This hierarchy is created from our museum records, it may not always accurately reflect modern taxonomies.

Taxonomic Hierarchy for University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum