Species Details

Eupithecia albicapitata

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum Read more about this collection »

IdentificationA small (1.4-1.8 cm wingspan) broad-winged moth. The wings are crossed by a fairly wide orange-maroon basal and subterminal bands. The orbicular is a large, blackish spot joinde to the costa via a thick bar of the same color. The hindwings are crossedf by a number of narrow, parallel partial bines, and there is a pronminent dark discal mark. Very similar to but slightly smaller than E. mutata. Positive identification can be made by examining the genitalia (see Bolte, 1990 for keys, descripions of unique characters, and illustrations of the adults and genitalia of both sexes).

Scientific Name Eupithecia albicapitata Identification
A small (1.4-1.8 cm wingspan) broad-winged moth. The wings are crossed by a fairly wide orange-maroon basal and subterminal bands. The orbicular is a large, blackish spot joinde to the costa via a thick bar of the…
A small (1.4-1.8 cm wingspan) broad-winged moth. The wings are crossed by a fairly wide orange-maroon basal and subterminal bands. The orbicular is a large, blackish spot joinde to the costa via a thick bar of the same color. The hindwings are crossedf by a number of narrow, parallel partial bines, and there is a pronminent dark discal mark. Very similar to but slightly smaller than E. mutata. Positive identification can be made by examining the genitalia (see Bolte, 1990 for keys, descripions of unique characters, and illustrations of the adults and genitalia of both sexes).
Life History
Larvae are borers in the cones of coniferous tress,mainly White spruce (Picea glauca) but also Engleman spruce, Doulas fir, Balsam fir, Red pine Jack pine. There is a single annal brood, with adults in July and…
Larvae are borers in the cones of coniferous tress,mainly White spruce (Picea glauca) but also Engleman spruce, Doulas fir, Balsam fir, Red pine Jack pine. There is a single annal brood, with adults in July and August. Adults are nocturnal and come to light. Hibernated in the pupal stage.
Range
Trancontinental, from Newfoundland to western BC, north to Alaks and subarctic Alberta, south to New England and New York. In Alberta it has been collected sparingly from the Caribou Mountains and foothills south to…
Trancontinental, from Newfoundland to western BC, north to Alaks and subarctic Alberta, south to New England and New York. In Alberta it has been collected sparingly from the Caribou Mountains and foothills south to the Battle River.
Notes Easy to mistake for E. mutata, and specimens are frequently misidentified.

Citation

Page Citation for Eupithecia albicapitata

Page Citation

"Species Details - Eupithecia albicapitata, University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum." University of Alberta Museums Search Site, https://search.museums.ualberta.ca/g/2-6386. Accessed 26 Sep. 2022.

Taxonomic Hierarchy

Kingdom Animalia Phylum Arthropoda Class Hexapoda Subclass Insecta Order Lepidoptera Suborder Ditrysia Superfamily Geometroidea Family Geometridae Subfamily Larentiinae Tribe Eupitheciini Genus Eupithecia Species Eupithecia albicapitata
This hierarchy is created from our museum records, it may not always accurately reflect modern taxonomies.

Taxonomic Hierarchy for University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum