Species Details

Phaneta montanana

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum Read more about this collection »

SeasonalityAlberta specimens as have been collected on May 19, 2005 and 10 June 1956. IdentificationA medium-sized (18-25 mm wingspan) Eucosmine moth. The forewings are long and somewhat pointed, yellow-brown or olivaceous-brown with a primarily longitudinal pattern of lighter streaks and lines. The hindwings are sooty black with a pale fringe. The genus is characterized by the lack of a costal fold in the male forewings. The forewings lack the basal patch and the median longitudinal white streak found in many members of the genus. The males have a somewhat inconspicuous though clearly defined ocelloid patch. The strigulations near the costa are characteristic, as is the small darker streak on the basal third of the wing the way out from the thorax. The many Alberta members of the genus are best separated by the unique combination of colors and markings on the upper side of the forewings.

Scientific Name Phaneta montanana Habitat Arid habitats, including sand dunes and probably badlands. One of the Alberta specimens was collected in an active blowout in old sand dunes. Seasonality Alberta specimens as have been collected on May 19, 2005 and 10 June 1956. Identification
A medium-sized (18-25 mm wingspan) Eucosmine moth. The forewings are long and somewhat pointed, yellow-brown or olivaceous-brown with a primarily longitudinal pattern of lighter streaks and lines. The hindwings are…
A medium-sized (18-25 mm wingspan) Eucosmine moth. The forewings are long and somewhat pointed, yellow-brown or olivaceous-brown with a primarily longitudinal pattern of lighter streaks and lines. The hindwings are sooty black with a pale fringe. The genus is characterized by the lack of a costal fold in the male forewings. The forewings lack the basal patch and the median longitudinal white streak found in many members of the genus. The males have a somewhat inconspicuous though clearly defined ocelloid patch. The strigulations near the costa are characteristic, as is the small darker streak on the basal third of the wing the way out from the thorax. The many Alberta members of the genus are best separated by the unique combination of colors and markings on the upper side of the forewings.
Life History Poorly known. Adults are diurnal, but also come to light. The larva has been found boring in the root of the host plant. Conservation Known from only two Alberta collections Diet Info
"The larva of montanana, according to data on a reared specimen recently received from Mr. L. P. Rockwood, of Forest Grove, Oregon, bores in the roots of 'sage brush' ('Artemisia dracunculo').”"(Heinrich 1923).
"The larva of montanana, according to data on a reared specimen recently received from Mr. L. P. Rockwood, of Forest Grove, Oregon, bores in the roots of 'sage brush' ('Artemisia dracunculo').”"(Heinrich 1923).
Range
A northern Great Plains species. Phaneta montanana has been reported from southern Manitoba and Saskatchewan, Montana, Oregon and Colorado (Heinrich 1923, Kearfott 1905). Donald J. Wright (pers. comm.) has also seen…
A northern Great Plains species. Phaneta montanana has been reported from southern Manitoba and Saskatchewan, Montana, Oregon and Colorado (Heinrich 1923, Kearfott 1905). Donald J. Wright (pers. comm.) has also seen specimens from North Dakota and eastern Montana. In Alberta, known only from single specimens collected at Elkwater Lake on 10 June 1956 by E.E. Sterns (CNC) and at the Pakowki Lake dunes on 19 May 2005 by G.G. Anweiler (UASM).

Citation

Page Citation for Phaneta montanana

Page Citation

"Phaneta montanana, University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum." University of Alberta Museums Search Site, https://search.museums.ualberta.ca/g/2-6335. Accessed 08 Dec. 2021.

Taxonomic Hierarchy

Kingdom Animalia Phylum Arthropoda Class Hexapoda Subclass Insecta Order Lepidoptera Suborder Ditrysia Superfamily Tortricoidea Family Tortricidae Subfamily Olethreutinae Genus Phaneta Species Phaneta montanana
This hierarchy is created from our museum records, it may not always accurately reflect modern taxonomies.

Taxonomic Hierarchy for University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum