Species Details

Pseudohermonassa tenuicula

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum Read more about this collection »

Common NameHair-pin Dart SeasonalityThere is a single annual brood, with adults on the wing in July and early August, peaking in mid July. IdentificationA medium-size moth (approx. 3.5 - 3.7 cm wingspan) with dull black forewings with a straight narrow pale yellow antemedian and curved postmedian lines. The small oblong orbicular spot and larger reniform spot are partially outlined with a fine line of light yellow scales. The cell before and between the two spots is jet black. Hindwings dirty white with a yellow tint, suffused with grey scales and with a dark discal mark and narrow black terminal line. Sexes similar, but male antennae setose, female simple. Smaller than P. bicarneaa and black, not dark brown, without the pale pink or yellow patches of scales in the basal area and on the costa beyond the reniform. Adults and the genitalia of both sexes are illustrated by Lafontaine (1998).

Scientific Name Pseudohermonassa tenuicula Common Name Hair-pin Dart Seasonality There is a single annual brood, with adults on the wing in July and early August, peaking in mid July. Identification
A medium-size moth (approx. 3.5 - 3.7 cm wingspan) with dull black forewings with a straight narrow pale yellow antemedian and curved postmedian lines. The small oblong orbicular spot and larger reniform spot are…
A medium-size moth (approx. 3.5 - 3.7 cm wingspan) with dull black forewings with a straight narrow pale yellow antemedian and curved postmedian lines. The small oblong orbicular spot and larger reniform spot are partially outlined with a fine line of light yellow scales. The cell before and between the two spots is jet black. Hindwings dirty white with a yellow tint, suffused with grey scales and with a dark discal mark and narrow black terminal line. Sexes similar, but male antennae setose, female simple. Smaller than P. bicarneaa and black, not dark brown, without the pale pink or yellow patches of scales in the basal area and on the costa beyond the reniform. Adults and the genitalia of both sexes are illustrated by Lafontaine (1998).
Life History Adults are nocturnal and come to light. The larva is described by Lafontaine (1998), and is illustrated by McCabe (1991). Diet Info The natural hostplants are unknown, but it has been reared in the laboratory on the grass Glyceria maxima (Hartm.) Holmb. Range
Primarily an eastern species, ranging west the eastern border of BC, north to the NWT and James Bay, south in the east to OH and MD, and in the west south in the mountains to CO. In Alberta collected mainly in the…
Primarily an eastern species, ranging west the eastern border of BC, north to the NWT and James Bay, south in the east to OH and MD, and in the west south in the mountains to CO. In Alberta collected mainly in the Aspen parklands, foothills and mountains.

Citation

Page Citation for Pseudohermonassa tenuicula

Page Citation

"Pseudohermonassa tenuicula, University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum." University of Alberta Museums Search Site, https://search.museums.ualberta.ca/g/2-6197. Accessed 20 Jun. 2021.

Taxonomic Hierarchy

Kingdom Animalia Phylum Arthropoda Class Hexapoda Subclass Insecta Order Lepidoptera Suborder Ditrysia Superfamily Noctuoidea Family Noctuidae Subfamily Noctuinae Genus Pseudohermonassa Species Pseudohermonassa tenuicula
This hierarchy is created from our museum records, it may not always accurately reflect modern taxonomies.

Taxonomic Hierarchy for University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum