Species Details

Epirrhoe sperryi

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum Read more about this collection »

Common NameSmall Argent & Sable IdentificationA small (1.8-2.0 cm wingspan) day-flying moth with black and white wings. The black forewings are crossed by a basal line of scattered white scales, a more prominent white antemedian band and a prominent white postmedian band divided by a series of small black dots and bent sharply outward near the midpoint. The subterminal area is black and is crossed by a subterminal line consisting of a series of small white crescents. Essentially the same pattern occurs on the hindwings. The fringe is black checkered with white at the veins. Very similar to forms of both Rheumaptera hastata and Rheumaptera subhastata, both of which are larger and usually have more extensive areas of black or white. E. alternata is also larger and is mostly grey, not black, and lacks the crisp, busy pattern of sperryi.

Scientific Name Epirrhoe sperryi Common Name Small Argent & Sable Habitat It frequents open wooded areas, edges, etc. Identification
A small (1.8-2.0 cm wingspan) day-flying moth with black and white wings. The black forewings are crossed by a basal line of scattered white scales, a more prominent white antemedian band and a prominent white…
A small (1.8-2.0 cm wingspan) day-flying moth with black and white wings. The black forewings are crossed by a basal line of scattered white scales, a more prominent white antemedian band and a prominent white postmedian band divided by a series of small black dots and bent sharply outward near the midpoint. The subterminal area is black and is crossed by a subterminal line consisting of a series of small white crescents. Essentially the same pattern occurs on the hindwings. The fringe is black checkered with white at the veins. Very similar to forms of both Rheumaptera hastata and Rheumaptera subhastata, both of which are larger and usually have more extensive areas of black or white. E. alternata is also larger and is mostly grey, not black, and lacks the crisp, busy pattern of sperryi.
Life History E. sperryi is a diurnal moth. There is a single brood in Alberta, with adults from early May through early July, with the peak in June. The early stages and larval hosts are apparently unknown. Diet Info Unknown, but other closely related Palaearctic species all feed on species of bedstraw (Gallium), which is the likely host for sperryi as well. Range NL to YT. In Alberta it has been collected in the Boreal, Parklands and Mountain regions, where it is locally common. Notes
Until described as a separate species by Herbulot in 1951, sperryi was thought to be conspecific with Palaearctic E. tristata (L.) and was listed by both Bowman and Jones as E. tristata. There are several closely…
Until described as a separate species by Herbulot in 1951, sperryi was thought to be conspecific with Palaearctic E. tristata (L.) and was listed by both Bowman and Jones as E. tristata. There are several closely related and almost identical looking species in the Palaearctic. The specimen illustrated above is from Dry Island P. Pk., AB.

Citation

Page Citation for Epirrhoe sperryi

Page Citation

"Epirrhoe sperryi, University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum." University of Alberta Museums Search Site, https://search.museums.ualberta.ca/g/2-6164. Accessed 21 Jan. 2022.

Taxonomic Hierarchy

Kingdom Animalia Phylum Arthropoda Class Hexapoda Subclass Insecta Order Lepidoptera Suborder Ditrysia Superfamily Geometroidea Family Geometridae Subfamily Larentiinae Tribe Xanthorhoini Genus Epirrhoe Species Epirrhoe sperryi
This hierarchy is created from our museum records, it may not always accurately reflect modern taxonomies.

Taxonomic Hierarchy for University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum