Species Details

Drepanulatrix falcataria

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum Read more about this collection »

IdentificationA relatively small moth (2.5-3.2 cm. wingspan) with broad falcate forewings. The forewings are variable in color and pattern, ranging from a relatively clear brown-pink to pinkish brown heavily sprinkled with black scales. There is a small black discal dot, and they are crossed by faint to prominent antemedian, median and postmedian cross lines. The hindwings are white with a pink cast, with a small dark discal dot and a slight dusting of dark scales near the margins. The variability in the appearance of these little moths is fairly extreme. However, they can be identified by the combination of small size, bright hindwings and falcate forewing shape.

Scientific Name Drepanulatrix falcataria Habitat Falcataria occurs in woodlands associated with Ceanothus sp. Identification
A relatively small moth (2.5-3.2 cm. wingspan) with broad falcate forewings. The forewings are variable in color and pattern, ranging from a relatively clear brown-pink to pinkish brown heavily sprinkled with black…
A relatively small moth (2.5-3.2 cm. wingspan) with broad falcate forewings. The forewings are variable in color and pattern, ranging from a relatively clear brown-pink to pinkish brown heavily sprinkled with black scales. There is a small black discal dot, and they are crossed by faint to prominent antemedian, median and postmedian cross lines. The hindwings are white with a pink cast, with a small dark discal dot and a slight dusting of dark scales near the margins. The variability in the appearance of these little moths is fairly extreme. However, they can be identified by the combination of small size, bright hindwings and falcate forewing shape.
Life History
Adults are nocturnal and come to light. There is apparently a single brood with adults (in BC) in June and July. According to McGuffin (1981) the larvae are reported to come in two color forms, brown and green. He…
Adults are nocturnal and come to light. There is apparently a single brood with adults (in BC) in June and July. According to McGuffin (1981) the larvae are reported to come in two color forms, brown and green. He states that all 50 he reared were green. Miller and Hammond illustrate a larva in color; however that larva is a patchwork of grey, silver, white, tan and black, with a thin broken yellow spiracular line! The larvae mature in five instars. The larval host plant is Ceanothus (Mller & Hammond 2003).
Range Extreme southwestern Alberta west to south central BC, south to Colorado, Utah and California. In Alberta known only from Waterton Lakes National Park.

Citation

Page Citation for Drepanulatrix falcataria

Page Citation

"Species Details - Drepanulatrix falcataria, University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum." University of Alberta Museums Search Site, https://search.museums.ualberta.ca/g/2-6162. Accessed 29 May. 2024.

Authorship

Name Anweiler, G. G.
Role species page author
Date 2007

References

Specimen Information

There are 2 specimens of this Species.

2 results plotted on map in 2 markers.
Note: Only records with latitude and longitude coordinates are plotted on map.

UASM59886 - Drepanulatrix falcataria

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Place CollectedCanada: British Columbia, Squilax Collected ByMcGuffin, W. C.

UASM59887 - Drepanulatrix falcataria

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum

Place CollectedCanada: British Columbia, Kaslo Collected ByCockle, J. W.

Adult Seasonal Distribution