Species Details

Scopula fuscata

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum Read more about this collection »

SeasonalityAlberta specimens have been collected in late June and early July. IdentificationA relatively small broad-winged moth (wingspan (2.4–2.8 cm.), but one of the larger Alberta species of the genus Scopula. The wings and body are light tan, almost white, liberally sprinkled with darker yellow-brown or grey-brown scales, except for the collar, frons, palps and legs, which are darker rusty-brown. Both the fore and hind wings are crossed by faint narrow median and postmedian lines, and even fainter partial antemedian and subterminal lines, in particular on the forewings. All four wings have a small black discal dot. The relatively large size, indistinct markings and discal dots will help separate fuscata from other Alberta Scopula species. The male and female genitalia are described and illustrated by McGuffin (1967).

Scientific Name Scopula fuscata Habitat Montane, including foothills. Seasonality Alberta specimens have been collected in late June and early July. Identification
A relatively small broad-winged moth (wingspan (2.4–2.8 cm.), but one of the larger Alberta species of the genus Scopula. The wings and body are light tan, almost white, liberally sprinkled with darker yellow-brown…
A relatively small broad-winged moth (wingspan (2.4–2.8 cm.), but one of the larger Alberta species of the genus Scopula. The wings and body are light tan, almost white, liberally sprinkled with darker yellow-brown or grey-brown scales, except for the collar, frons, palps and legs, which are darker rusty-brown. Both the fore and hind wings are crossed by faint narrow median and postmedian lines, and even fainter partial antemedian and subterminal lines, in particular on the forewings. All four wings have a small black discal dot. The relatively large size, indistinct markings and discal dots will help separate fuscata from other Alberta Scopula species. The male and female genitalia are described and illustrated by McGuffin (1967).
Life History Very poorly known. There is a single annual brood, and adults are likely nocturnal and attracted to light. Conservation An uncommon (or uncommonly collected) species in Alberta, known from less than a dozen specimens. Range A western species, occurring from southwestern Saskatchewan west to B.C., south to California and Arizona. It occurs in extreme southern Alberta, north to the Crowsnest Pass (Hillcrest), Lethbridge and the Cypress Hills.

Citation

Page Citation for Scopula fuscata

Page Citation

"Scopula fuscata, University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum." University of Alberta Museums Search Site, https://search.museums.ualberta.ca/g/2-6105. Accessed 19 Sep. 2021.

Taxonomic Hierarchy

Kingdom Animalia Phylum Arthropoda Class Hexapoda Subclass Insecta Order Lepidoptera Suborder Ditrysia Superfamily Geometroidea Family Geometridae Subfamily Sterrhinae Tribe Scopulini Genus Scopula Species Scopula fuscata
This hierarchy is created from our museum records, it may not always accurately reflect modern taxonomies.

Taxonomic Hierarchy for University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum