Species Details

Endothenia albolineana

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum Read more about this collection »

Common NameSpruce Needleminer SeasonalityAdults emerge and begin to fly in mid June to early July. IdentificationSmall sized Endothenia species. Alberta specimens show a distinctive forewing pattern of alternating brown and white vertical bars. Generally these moths exhibit grayish-brown colors with a wingspan of approximately 1/2 inch (Spackman 1991).

Scientific Name Endothenia albolineana Common Name Spruce Needleminer Habitat Likely forests or other areas with spruce trees present, since this species shows a strong association with spruce trees (Spackman 1991 and Shetlar 2006). Seasonality Adults emerge and begin to fly in mid June to early July. Identification
Small sized Endothenia species. Alberta specimens show a distinctive forewing pattern of alternating brown and white vertical bars. Generally these moths exhibit grayish-brown colors with a wingspan of approximately…
Small sized Endothenia species. Alberta specimens show a distinctive forewing pattern of alternating brown and white vertical bars. Generally these moths exhibit grayish-brown colors with a wingspan of approximately 1/2 inch (Spackman 1991).
Life History
Larvae over winter in constructed nests made up of live and dead spruce needles. Nests are usually found at the base of large branches where the thickest growth occurs. Females lay between 2-8 eggs beside a needle,…
Larvae over winter in constructed nests made up of live and dead spruce needles. Nests are usually found at the base of large branches where the thickest growth occurs. Females lay between 2-8 eggs beside a needle, which hatch in about 10 days. The larvae usually pupate in late May to early June and adults emerge approximately two weeks later. (Spackman 1991). One generation per year (Cranshaw et. al. 1994).
Conservation Not of concern. Diet Info Larvae hosts include a variety of spruce tree species (Shetlar 2006). The larvae feed on the entire contents of spruce needles (Spackman 1991). However, the larvae only feed on dead needles (Shetlar 2006). Range Most of Northern United States and Canada (Shetlar 2006). Recorded Alberta specimen was collected in Edmonton. Notes Considered a pest species in the United States and Canada (Spackman (1991), Shetlar (2006) and Horticulture Inquiries (2006)).

Citation

Page Citation for Endothenia albolineana

Page Citation

"Species Details - Endothenia albolineana, University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum." University of Alberta Museums Search Site, https://search.museums.ualberta.ca/g/2-5952. Accessed 14 Aug. 2022.

Taxonomic Hierarchy

Kingdom Animalia Phylum Arthropoda Class Hexapoda Subclass Insecta Order Lepidoptera Suborder Ditrysia Superfamily Tortricoidea Family Tortricidae Subfamily Olethreutinae Genus Endothenia Species Endothenia albolineana
This hierarchy is created from our museum records, it may not always accurately reflect modern taxonomies.

Taxonomic Hierarchy for University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum