Species Details

Idia aemula

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum Read more about this collection »

Common NamePowdered Snout, Common Idia SeasonalityAdults have been collected from mid-June through late August. IdentificationA small (2.0-3.0 cm. wingspan) brown broad-winged moth. The forewings are crossed by thin, jagged black lines, and the reniform is marked by a conspicuous pale orange or yellow spot. The hingwings are almost as dark as the forewings in tone, and are crossed by a series of indistinct narrow lines. Darker specimens of Idia sp. nr. aemula can be very difficult to separate from aemula. The lack of significant contrast in shade between the hindwings and forewings in aemula will separate most specimens from Idia sp. nr. aemula.

Scientific Name Idia aemula Common Name Powdered Snout, Common Idia Habitat Wooded areas. Seasonality Adults have been collected from mid-June through late August. Identification
A small (2.0-3.0 cm. wingspan) brown broad-winged moth. The forewings are crossed by thin, jagged black lines, and the reniform is marked by a conspicuous pale orange or yellow spot. The hingwings are almost as dark…
A small (2.0-3.0 cm. wingspan) brown broad-winged moth. The forewings are crossed by thin, jagged black lines, and the reniform is marked by a conspicuous pale orange or yellow spot. The hingwings are almost as dark as the forewings in tone, and are crossed by a series of indistinct narrow lines. Darker specimens of Idia sp. nr. aemula can be very difficult to separate from aemula. The lack of significant contrast in shade between the hindwings and forewings in aemula will separate most specimens from Idia sp. nr. aemula.
Life History
Like the other species of Idia in Alberta, aemula can be collected at both lights and sugar baits. They are found in wooded areas, where the larvae feed on dead, decaying leaves on the woodland floor. There are also…
Like the other species of Idia in Alberta, aemula can be collected at both lights and sugar baits. They are found in wooded areas, where the larvae feed on dead, decaying leaves on the woodland floor. There are also old reports of the larvae causing damage to corn fodder. Reports of aemula feeding on living coniferous needles (Prentice, 1962) refer to misidentified Idia sp. nr. aemula.
Conservation A common widespread species. No concerns. Diet Info No Alberta data. Elsewhere reported to feed on fallen dead and decaying leaves. Range
Throughout much of eastern North America, west to at least western Alberta. In Alberta, found from the wooded areas along the Milk River north to Lake Athabasca, and into the foothills and lower elevations of the…
Throughout much of eastern North America, west to at least western Alberta. In Alberta, found from the wooded areas along the Milk River north to Lake Athabasca, and into the foothills and lower elevations of the mountains. Unlike Idia sp. nr. aemula, aemula occurs widely through the Aspen parkland and grasslands regions. Distribution records published prior to about 1990 may refer to either aemula and sp. nr. aemula in areas where there are conifers.

Citation

Page Citation for Idia aemula

Page Citation

"Species Details - Idia aemula, University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum." University of Alberta Museums Search Site, https://search.museums.ualberta.ca/g/2-582. Accessed 11 Aug. 2022.

Taxonomic Hierarchy

Kingdom Animalia Phylum Arthropoda Class Hexapoda Subclass Insecta Order Lepidoptera Suborder Ditrysia Superfamily Noctuoidea Family Noctuidae Subfamily Herminiinae Genus Idia Species Idia aemula
This hierarchy is created from our museum records, it may not always accurately reflect modern taxonomies.

Taxonomic Hierarchy for University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum