Species Details

Olethreutes inornatana

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum Read more about this collection »

SeasonalityAlberta material has been collected from June 21 to July 18. IdentificationA Tortricid moth of the subfamily Olethreutinae and tribe Olethreutini. Formerly in the genus Exartema along with the related species punctana and quadrifidus but now in the large genus Olethreutes. These three species all have wings that are olivaceous brown in color with somewhat darker apical and mid costal patches, wingspans in the 16-20 mm range, fly at the same time and have similar food plants. The fore wings of this species differ from punctana by lacking a dark basal patch and discal spot, and from quadrifidus by lacking a fine line of white scaling following the fold. Like punctana, the male genitalia have a digitus projecting from the neck of the harpe near the sacculus, whereas quadrifidus has a digitus near the cucullus. The male genitalia are illustrated in both Heinrich (1926) and Miller (1987).

Scientific Name Olethreutes inornatana Seasonality Alberta material has been collected from June 21 to July 18. Identification
A Tortricid moth of the subfamily Olethreutinae and tribe Olethreutini. Formerly in the genus Exartema along with the related species punctana and quadrifidus but now in the large genus Olethreutes. These three…
A Tortricid moth of the subfamily Olethreutinae and tribe Olethreutini. Formerly in the genus Exartema along with the related species punctana and quadrifidus but now in the large genus Olethreutes. These three species all have wings that are olivaceous brown in color with somewhat darker apical and mid costal patches, wingspans in the 16-20 mm range, fly at the same time and have similar food plants. The fore wings of this species differ from punctana by lacking a dark basal patch and discal spot, and from quadrifidus by lacking a fine line of white scaling following the fold. Like punctana, the male genitalia have a digitus projecting from the neck of the harpe near the sacculus, whereas quadrifidus has a digitus near the cucullus. The male genitalia are illustrated in both Heinrich (1926) and Miller (1987).
Life History Comes to light. Conservation Apparently not widespread, but probably of no concern. Diet Info Prunus and Cornus (Heinrich 1926) of which it is a leaf tier, also other species in the east. Range
Apparently an eastern thing. Heinrich (1926) has it from Pennsylvania, New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Ohio, Illinois, Kansas, Texas and Quebec. Miller (1987) reports it from…
Apparently an eastern thing. Heinrich (1926) has it from Pennsylvania, New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Ohio, Illinois, Kansas, Texas and Quebec. Miller (1987) reports it from Michigan, Wisconsin and Maine. In Alberta, it is known from Dry Island Buffalo Jump Provincial Park. UASM material named inornatana was actually of quadrifidus.
Olethreutes inornatana
Olethreutes inornatana

Citation

Page Citation for Olethreutes inornatana

Page Citation

"Olethreutes inornatana, University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum." University of Alberta Museums Search Site, https://search.museums.ualberta.ca/g/2-5800. Accessed 12 May. 2021.

Taxonomic Hierarchy

Kingdom Animalia Phylum Arthropoda Class Hexapoda Subclass Insecta Order Lepidoptera Suborder Ditrysia Superfamily Tortricoidea Family Tortricidae Subfamily Olethreutinae Genus Olethreutes Species Olethreutes inornatana
This hierarchy is created from our museum records, it may not always accurately reflect modern taxonomies.

Taxonomic Hierarchy for University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum