Species Details

Caloptilia alnivorella

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum Read more about this collection »

Common NameAlder Leafminer SeasonalityAdult specimens collected in Alberta through the warm moths (May-September). IdentificationSmall pushup moths (14mm wingspan) with light brown background colour on body and wings. Gray and black scales form patterns on the wings. Fringes of the wings are gray. Antennae are filiform and longer than body. Adults are very similar to Caloptilia elongella and C. alnicolella, but are distinguishable by the genitalia. Caloptilia alnivorella males have an unarmed intromittent organ. The ventral margin of the clasper is concave apically, and angled midway. Female ductus bursae are long thin and extremely membranous. The bursa is membranous and bag-like (McDunnough, 1946).

Scientific Name Caloptilia alnivorella Common Name Alder Leafminer Habitat Parkland and forest edges. Seasonality Adult specimens collected in Alberta through the warm moths (May-September). Identification
Small pushup moths (14mm wingspan) with light brown background colour on body and wings. Gray and black scales form patterns on the wings. Fringes of the wings are gray. Antennae are filiform and longer than body. …
Small pushup moths (14mm wingspan) with light brown background colour on body and wings. Gray and black scales form patterns on the wings. Fringes of the wings are gray. Antennae are filiform and longer than body. Adults are very similar to Caloptilia elongella and C. alnicolella, but are distinguishable by the genitalia. Caloptilia alnivorella males have an unarmed intromittent organ. The ventral margin of the clasper is concave apically, and angled midway. Female ductus bursae are long thin and extremely membranous. The bursa is membranous and bag-like (McDunnough, 1946).
Life History
Early larvae mine the epidermis of alder leaves (Tatum, 2004). Later instars form tents in alder leaves by bending the lateral edges and attaching them together. Within the tent, a small fold is made at the edge for…
Early larvae mine the epidermis of alder leaves (Tatum, 2004). Later instars form tents in alder leaves by bending the lateral edges and attaching them together. Within the tent, a small fold is made at the edge for a pupation site. The cocoon is within the fold or on the surface of the leaf (McDunnough, 1946). Adults overwinter in the fall and come out in the spring to mate. Eggs are laid on fresh alder leaves in early spring.
Conservation Common. Diet Info Alnus mollis and other alders (McDunnough, 1946). Range Widespread through the eastern provinces, Nunavut and North West Territories, but originally described in Colorado. Found throughout northern Alberta.

Citation

Page Citation for Caloptilia alnivorella

Page Citation

"Caloptilia alnivorella, University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum." University of Alberta Museums Search Site, https://search.museums.ualberta.ca/g/2-5415. Accessed 21 May. 2022.

Taxonomic Hierarchy

Kingdom Animalia Phylum Arthropoda Class Hexapoda Subclass Insecta Order Lepidoptera Suborder Ditrysia Superfamily Gracillarioidea Family Gracillariidae Subfamily Gracillariinae Genus Caloptilia Species Caloptilia alnivorella
This hierarchy is created from our museum records, it may not always accurately reflect modern taxonomies.

Taxonomic Hierarchy for University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum