Species Details

Anicla exuberans

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum Read more about this collection »

SeasonalityAdults have been collected in Alberta from late June to early August. IdentificationA medium size moth (3.7- 4.1 cm wingspan) that comes in both grey and reddish-brown color forms. The forewings have few prominent markings, and are dusted with grey scales giving them a clouded or frosty appearance. The reniform usually stands out against the ground, and there are poorly defined darker markings along the costa and in the terminal area, especially near the apex. The hindwings are white, with a bit of dark shading along the outer margin. The narrow, jet-black thoracic collar will separate exuberans from most similar moths, in particular from Euxoa sp. The related and much more common Anicla tepperi is gray and has prominent dark lines crossing the forewings. Until recently placed in the genus Euagrotis, now sunk as a subgenus under Anicla (Lafontaine 2004). The older literature (i.e. Bowman, 1951) lists it as E. bairdi.

Scientific Name Anicla exuberans Habitat Dry native prairie and montane grassland; badland edges. Seasonality Adults have been collected in Alberta from late June to early August. Identification
A medium size moth (3.7- 4.1 cm wingspan) that comes in both grey and reddish-brown color forms. The forewings have few prominent markings, and are dusted with grey scales giving them a clouded or frosty appearance.…
A medium size moth (3.7- 4.1 cm wingspan) that comes in both grey and reddish-brown color forms. The forewings have few prominent markings, and are dusted with grey scales giving them a clouded or frosty appearance. The reniform usually stands out against the ground, and there are poorly defined darker markings along the costa and in the terminal area, especially near the apex. The hindwings are white, with a bit of dark shading along the outer margin. The narrow, jet-black thoracic collar will separate exuberans from most similar moths, in particular from Euxoa sp. The related and much more common Anicla tepperi is gray and has prominent dark lines crossing the forewings. Until recently placed in the genus Euagrotis, now sunk as a subgenus under Anicla (Lafontaine 2004). The older literature (i.e. Bowman, 1951) lists it as E. bairdi.
Life History The immature stages are unknown. The adults are nocturnal and are attracted to light. There is a single brood each year. Conservation An uncommon species; no reasons for concern. Diet Info No information available. Range Central Mexico north to the dry interior of southern BC, southern Alberta and southwestern Saskatchewan. In Alberta they have been collected locally north to Tolman Bridge.

Citation

Page Citation for Anicla exuberans

Page Citation

"Species Details - Anicla exuberans, University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum." University of Alberta Museums Search Site, https://search.museums.ualberta.ca/g/2-5354. Accessed 04 Jul. 2022.

Taxonomic Hierarchy

Kingdom Animalia Phylum Arthropoda Class Hexapoda Subclass Insecta Order Lepidoptera Suborder Ditrysia Superfamily Noctuoidea Family Noctuidae Subfamily Noctuinae Genus Anicla Species Anicla exuberans
This hierarchy is created from our museum records, it may not always accurately reflect modern taxonomies.

Taxonomic Hierarchy for University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum