Species Details

Lacinipolia longiclava

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum Read more about this collection »

SeasonalityAdults fly in Alberta in late May and June. IdentificationA small and relatively long-winged noctuid. It can be separated from other similar Alberta Lacinipolia species by its spring flight period, its predominantly yellowish-brown coloration, and the diagnostic but sometimes faint pale streak across the lower forewing. The reniform and orbicular are usually ringed with paler scales, and the later is usually oblong rather than round. The forewing fringe is partially checkered with pale scales at the veins. The hindwings are light grey-brown. The male gentalia have a large, long curved clasper, in Alberta species found only in longiclava and L. anguina. Like anguina, longiclava flies in the spring. Longiclava can be separated from anguina by the predominantly brown tones (grey in anguina), the pale longitudinal dash across the lower forewing, and by the more prominent checkering on the forewing fringe.

Scientific Name Lacinipolia longiclava Habitat Arid grasslands and badlands; grassy dunes. Seasonality Adults fly in Alberta in late May and June. Identification
A small and relatively long-winged noctuid. It can be separated from other similar Alberta Lacinipolia species by its spring flight period, its predominantly yellowish-brown coloration, and the diagnostic but…
A small and relatively long-winged noctuid. It can be separated from other similar Alberta Lacinipolia species by its spring flight period, its predominantly yellowish-brown coloration, and the diagnostic but sometimes faint pale streak across the lower forewing. The reniform and orbicular are usually ringed with paler scales, and the later is usually oblong rather than round. The forewing fringe is partially checkered with pale scales at the veins. The hindwings are light grey-brown. The male gentalia have a large, long curved clasper, in Alberta species found only in longiclava and L. anguina. Like anguina, longiclava flies in the spring. Longiclava can be separated from anguina by the predominantly brown tones (grey in anguina), the pale longitudinal dash across the lower forewing, and by the more prominent checkering on the forewing fringe.
Life History Poorly known. Adults are nocturnal and come to light, and there is a single spring-flying brood annually. Conservation No concerns Diet Info unknown Range A western grasslands species, occurring north to southwestern Saskatchewan and southeastern Alberta. In Alberta it occurs in the arid grasslands and badlands areas, north to the sandhills east of Edgerton.

Citation

Page Citation for Lacinipolia longiclava

Page Citation

"Species Details - Lacinipolia longiclava, University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum." University of Alberta Museums Search Site, https://search.museums.ualberta.ca/g/2-5331. Accessed 26 Sep. 2022.

Taxonomic Hierarchy

Kingdom Animalia Phylum Arthropoda Class Hexapoda Subclass Insecta Order Lepidoptera Suborder Ditrysia Superfamily Noctuoidea Family Noctuidae Subfamily Hadeninae Genus Lacinipolia Species Lacinipolia longiclava
This hierarchy is created from our museum records, it may not always accurately reflect modern taxonomies.

Taxonomic Hierarchy for University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum