Species Details

Agrotis vancouverensis

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum Read more about this collection »

Common NameVancouver Dart SeasonalityAdults in late spring and early summer, with the main flight in June IdentificationA medium size moth (forewing length about 33 mm) with light and dark reddish brown forewings. The subterminal area in particular is usually lighter brown, and is crossed by poorly defined jagged light and dark lines. The orbicular and reniform spots are well defined, with the area before and between them blackish. The basal dash-claviform spot is prominent and filled with black scales. Hidwings brown. Very similar to and often confused with A. obliqua, which is slightly larger, darker, and less streaky appearing. Specimens of vancouverensis and obliqua are difficult to separate, and are frequently found misidentified in collections.

Scientific Name Agrotis vancouverensis Common Name Vancouver Dart Seasonality Adults in late spring and early summer, with the main flight in June Identification
A medium size moth (forewing length about 33 mm) with light and dark reddish brown forewings. The subterminal area in particular is usually lighter brown, and is crossed by poorly defined jagged light and dark lines.…
A medium size moth (forewing length about 33 mm) with light and dark reddish brown forewings. The subterminal area in particular is usually lighter brown, and is crossed by poorly defined jagged light and dark lines. The orbicular and reniform spots are well defined, with the area before and between them blackish. The basal dash-claviform spot is prominent and filled with black scales. Hidwings brown. Very similar to and often confused with A. obliqua, which is slightly larger, darker, and less streaky appearing. Specimens of vancouverensis and obliqua are difficult to separate, and are frequently found misidentified in collections.
Life History
Agrotis vancouverensis is single brooded, with adults in late spring and early summer, with the main flight in June. They are nocturnal and come to light. The larva is described by both Crumb (1956) and Lafontaine (2004).
Agrotis vancouverensis is single brooded, with adults in late spring and early summer, with the main flight in June. They are nocturnal and come to light. The larva is described by both Crumb (1956) and Lafontaine (2004).
Diet Info Larvae have been collected on both strawberry and clover, and are likely generalists on low growing herbs. Range
Agrotis vancouverensis has a western distribution, and is absent from most of the Great Plains and Great Basin regions. In Alberta is has been collected widely in the parklands, foothills and mountains, and in wooded…
Agrotis vancouverensis has a western distribution, and is absent from most of the Great Plains and Great Basin regions. In Alberta is has been collected widely in the parklands, foothills and mountains, and in wooded parts of the grasslands region.
Notes The Vancouver Dart is the most common and most variable species of Agrotis in western North America.

Citation

Page Citation for Agrotis vancouverensis

Page Citation

"Agrotis vancouverensis, University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum." University of Alberta Museums Search Site, https://search.museums.ualberta.ca/g/2-5297. Accessed 29 Nov. 2021.

Taxonomic Hierarchy

Kingdom Animalia Phylum Arthropoda Class Hexapoda Subclass Insecta Order Lepidoptera Suborder Ditrysia Superfamily Noctuoidea Family Noctuidae Subfamily Noctuinae Genus Agrotis Species Agrotis vancouverensis
This hierarchy is created from our museum records, it may not always accurately reflect modern taxonomies.

Taxonomic Hierarchy for University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum