Species Details

Lithophane grotei

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum Read more about this collection »

Common NameGrote's Sallow SeasonalityAdults in Alberta September - (hibernates) - April. IdentificationA medium-size (4.2-5.0 cm wingspan) long-winged dull grey moth. The black basal dash is short and inconspicuous, and there is light grey shading along the basal part of the costa. The doubled black antemedian line is jagged and linked on the lower half to the black-outlined claviform spot. The pale orbicular spot stands out against the ground, and has a small satellite spot at the lower margin. The hourglass-shaped reniform is outlined in black, filled with pale grey, and there is a series of dark wedges marking the subterminal line. The hindwings are grey-brown. Similar to L. georgii, L. unimoda and L. laticinerea. L. georgii is paler grey with a long thin black basal streak, the cross lines are obscure or obsolete and there is fine dark scaling along the veins giving a faintly streakier appearance. The other two species are darker than georgii, with less prominent cross lines. There are good genital characters, and dissections may be required to separate grotei, laticinerea, and unimoda.

Scientific Name Lithophane grotei Common Name Grote's Sallow Habitat Deciduous and mixedwood forest. Seasonality Adults in Alberta September - (hibernates) - April. Identification
A medium-size (4.2-5.0 cm wingspan) long-winged dull grey moth. The black basal dash is short and inconspicuous, and there is light grey shading along the basal part of the costa. The doubled black antemedian line is…
A medium-size (4.2-5.0 cm wingspan) long-winged dull grey moth. The black basal dash is short and inconspicuous, and there is light grey shading along the basal part of the costa. The doubled black antemedian line is jagged and linked on the lower half to the black-outlined claviform spot. The pale orbicular spot stands out against the ground, and has a small satellite spot at the lower margin. The hourglass-shaped reniform is outlined in black, filled with pale grey, and there is a series of dark wedges marking the subterminal line. The hindwings are grey-brown. Similar to L. georgii, L. unimoda and L. laticinerea. L. georgii is paler grey with a long thin black basal streak, the cross lines are obscure or obsolete and there is fine dark scaling along the veins giving a faintly streakier appearance. The other two species are darker than georgii, with less prominent cross lines. There are good genital characters, and dissections may be required to separate grotei, laticinerea, and unimoda.
Life History Adults emerge in fall, hibernate and appear again in spring. They come to both light and bait. Larvae are solitary defoliators, and when reared in captivity are cannibalistic. (Covell 1984) Conservation Uncommon but widespread; no concerns. Diet Info
No Alberta data; elsewhere recorded from a variety of deciduous trees and shrubs, including birch (Betula) and maple (Acer)(Prentice 1962), oak (Quercus) and red chokecherry (Prunus). Also reported to be a destructive…
No Alberta data; elsewhere recorded from a variety of deciduous trees and shrubs, including birch (Betula) and maple (Acer)(Prentice 1962), oak (Quercus) and red chokecherry (Prunus). Also reported to be a destructive green fruitworm on apple (Malus) in New York (Rings et al).
Range Uncommon is east central Alberta, west to Redwater. Widespread in eastern North America, but not previously reported from west of Ontario.

Citation

Page Citation for Lithophane grotei

Page Citation

"Species Details - Lithophane grotei, University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum." University of Alberta Museums Search Site, https://search.museums.ualberta.ca/g/2-5195. Accessed 13 Aug. 2022.

Taxonomic Hierarchy

Kingdom Animalia Phylum Arthropoda Class Hexapoda Subclass Insecta Order Lepidoptera Suborder Ditrysia Superfamily Noctuoidea Family Noctuidae Subfamily Cuculliinae Genus Lithophane Species Lithophane grotei
This hierarchy is created from our museum records, it may not always accurately reflect modern taxonomies.

Taxonomic Hierarchy for University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum