Species Details

Stretchia plusiaeformis

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum Read more about this collection »

SeasonalityAdults fly in Alberta in late April and May. IdentificationThe large characteristic pale orbicular and reniform spots, connected at the bottom to form a large shallow V or W will identify specimens of Stretchia. Plusiaeformis is a mostly grey moth, found in drier sites than the other Alberta species, S. muricina. Muricina replaces plusiaeformis in shaded wooded sites in the grasslands region and foothills, and is slightly smaller and darker red-brown. However, the two species are extremely similar in appearance and males in particular may be impossible to identify with certainty. Females are easily separated as the antennae of plusiaeformis females are strongly serrated with the side branches triangular and shorter than the shaft. In muricina, the female antennae are pectinate with the side branches long and narrow.

Scientific Name Stretchia plusiaeformis Seasonality Adults fly in Alberta in late April and May. Identification
The large characteristic pale orbicular and reniform spots, connected at the bottom to form a large shallow V or W will identify specimens of Stretchia. Plusiaeformis is a mostly grey moth, found in drier sites than…
The large characteristic pale orbicular and reniform spots, connected at the bottom to form a large shallow V or W will identify specimens of Stretchia. Plusiaeformis is a mostly grey moth, found in drier sites than the other Alberta species, S. muricina. Muricina replaces plusiaeformis in shaded wooded sites in the grasslands region and foothills, and is slightly smaller and darker red-brown. However, the two species are extremely similar in appearance and males in particular may be impossible to identify with certainty. Females are easily separated as the antennae of plusiaeformis females are strongly serrated with the side branches triangular and shorter than the shaft. In muricina, the female antennae are pectinate with the side branches long and narrow.
Life History Stretchia are single-brooded, and the adults come to light. They fly in early spring. Conservation Widespread and locally common; no concerns. Diet Info Larvae are solitary defoliators of gooseberry and currents (Ribes sp.). Range
New Brunswick west to British Columbia. In Alberta they occur mainly along the southern part of the boreal forest and in the parkland regions, north to the Peace River region and south at least to the Rumsay, Dry…
New Brunswick west to British Columbia. In Alberta they occur mainly along the southern part of the boreal forest and in the parkland regions, north to the Peace River region and south at least to the Rumsay, Dry Island (Tolman Bridge) Provincial Park and the foothills at Calgary. They are replaced in the grasslands and southern foothills regions by the closely related and very similar S. muricina.

Citation

Page Citation for Stretchia plusiaeformis

Page Citation

"Stretchia plusiaeformis, University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum." University of Alberta Museums Search Site, https://search.museums.ualberta.ca/g/2-5194. Accessed 20 Jun. 2021.

Taxonomic Hierarchy

Kingdom Animalia Phylum Arthropoda Class Hexapoda Subclass Insecta Order Lepidoptera Suborder Ditrysia Superfamily Noctuoidea Family Noctuidae Subfamily Hadeninae Genus Stretchia Species Stretchia plusiaeformis
This hierarchy is created from our museum records, it may not always accurately reflect modern taxonomies.

Taxonomic Hierarchy for University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum