Species Details

Dioryctria abietivorella

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum Read more about this collection »

Common NameFir Coneworm SeasonalityAdults fly July - September. IdentificationWingspan 10.0-13.0 mm. Lacking raised scales. Forewings primarily black and white with prominent a discocellular spot. Small beige patch in subbasal area but lacking reddish scales throughout wing. Male genitalia: Uncus with slight constriction. Valve with a prominent apical projection and accessory spine. Vesica with a large cornutus and many smaller cornutii. Female genitalia: Sclerotized ductus bursae with a longitudinal membranous region. Pheromones: Blend of Z9 E11-14Ac 100 + Z9 E12-14 Ac 1. Additional components may be present.

Scientific Name Dioryctria abietivorella Common Name Fir Coneworm Habitat Coniferous forests throughout range. Seasonality Adults fly July - September. Identification
Wingspan 10.0-13.0 mm. Lacking raised scales. Forewings primarily black and white with prominent a discocellular spot. Small beige patch in subbasal area but lacking reddish scales throughout wing. Male genitalia:…
Wingspan 10.0-13.0 mm. Lacking raised scales. Forewings primarily black and white with prominent a discocellular spot. Small beige patch in subbasal area but lacking reddish scales throughout wing. Male genitalia: Uncus with slight constriction. Valve with a prominent apical projection and accessory spine. Vesica with a large cornutus and many smaller cornutii. Female genitalia: Sclerotized ductus bursae with a longitudinal membranous region. Pheromones: Blend of Z9 E11-14Ac 100 + Z9 E12-14 Ac 1. Additional components may be present.
Life History
Adults emerge and lay eggs under scales of new cones or under bark. Larvae will feed internally on cones, needles, twigs and under the bark of the host. Feeding sites can be recognized by the accumulation of webbing…
Adults emerge and lay eggs under scales of new cones or under bark. Larvae will feed internally on cones, needles, twigs and under the bark of the host. Feeding sites can be recognized by the accumulation of webbing and frass around the entrance hole or around needles and twigs forming a loose shelter. Pupation occurs in host. Population numbers may reach infestation levels, especially in seed orchard environments.
Conservation Not a concern. Larvae are economic pests particularly in seed orchard environments. Diet Info Recorded from a wide range of coniferous hosts. Fir, spruce, and Douglas-fir are the primary hosts, though larvae have also been recorded from various pine species. Range Found transcontinentally. Recorded throughout southern Canada and south to California and North Carolina, though absent from the central plains. ( Leidy and Neunzig 1986; Neunzig 2004).

Citation

Page Citation for Dioryctria abietivorella

Page Citation

"Species Details - Dioryctria abietivorella, University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum." University of Alberta Museums Search Site, https://search.museums.ualberta.ca/g/2-4931. Accessed 11 Aug. 2022.

Taxonomic Hierarchy

Kingdom Animalia Phylum Arthropoda Class Hexapoda Subclass Insecta Order Lepidoptera Suborder Ditrysia Superfamily Pyraloidea Family Pyralidae Subfamily Phycitinae Genus Dioryctria Species Dioryctria abietivorella
This hierarchy is created from our museum records, it may not always accurately reflect modern taxonomies.

Taxonomic Hierarchy for University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum