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Species Details

Macaria signaria

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum Read more about this collection »

Common NamePale-marked Angle, Spruce-fir Looper SeasonalityAdults have been collected in Alberta from mid May through July. IdentificationA medium-sized (2.0-2.8 cm wingspan) broad winged geometrid moth. The fringe on the upper third of the forewing is dark, resulting in the forewings appearing slightly pointed or falcate. They are dull powdery brownish grey or grey over a dirty white ground, crossed by fine dark antemedian, median, and postmedian lines, and with a small dark spot or blotch just distad to and midway down the postmedian line. The hind wing is dirty white, heavily speckled and blotched with dark grey, with two partial faint crosslines, most prominent where they meet the inner margin, and with a fine black discal dot. There is a narrow dark terminal line, and the light brownish fringe is checked with dark scales at the veins. The larvae reach a length of about 25 mm. The head is yellow-green with darker herringbone pattern. Body is light to medium green with grey and white lines along the back and sides. The larva is described and illustrated in color in both Wagner (2001) and Wong and Ives (op. cit). Adults are very similar to those of M. submarmorata, sexpunctata, unipunctaria, and banksiana. M. unipunctaria and banksiana are restricted to the mountains along the western edge of the province. Sexmaculata is smaller in size and is found only in association with Larch (Larix laricina). Previously known as Semiothisa granitata.

Scientific Name Macaria signaria Common Name Pale-marked Angle, Spruce-fir Looper Habitat Coniferous and mixedwood forest; bogs, etc. Seasonality Adults have been collected in Alberta from mid May through July. Identification
A medium-sized (2.0-2.8 cm wingspan) broad winged geometrid moth. The fringe on the upper third of the forewing is dark, resulting in the forewings appearing slightly pointed or falcate. They are dull powdery…
A medium-sized (2.0-2.8 cm wingspan) broad winged geometrid moth. The fringe on the upper third of the forewing is dark, resulting in the forewings appearing slightly pointed or falcate. They are dull powdery brownish grey or grey over a dirty white ground, crossed by fine dark antemedian, median, and postmedian lines, and with a small dark spot or blotch just distad to and midway down the postmedian line. The hind wing is dirty white, heavily speckled and blotched with dark grey, with two partial faint crosslines, most prominent where they meet the inner margin, and with a fine black discal dot. There is a narrow dark terminal line, and the light brownish fringe is checked with dark scales at the veins. The larvae reach a length of about 25 mm. The head is yellow-green with darker herringbone pattern. Body is light to medium green with grey and white lines along the back and sides. The larva is described and illustrated in color in both Wagner (2001) and Wong and Ives (op. cit). Adults are very similar to those of M. submarmorata, sexpunctata, unipunctaria, and banksiana. M. unipunctaria and banksiana are restricted to the mountains along the western edge of the province. Sexmaculata is smaller in size and is found only in association with Larch (Larix laricina). Previously known as Semiothisa granitata.
Life History
There is a single annual brood, which overwinter in the pupal stage Up to about 150 eggs, usually at the base of needles or on strands of Alectoria lichen. Eggs hatch in 5-14 days, and there are 5 or occasionally 6…
There is a single annual brood, which overwinter in the pupal stage Up to about 150 eggs, usually at the base of needles or on strands of Alectoria lichen. Eggs hatch in 5-14 days, and there are 5 or occasionally 6 larval instars (McGuffin, 1972). The adults are nocturnal and come to light.
Conservation A common, widespread species. Diet Info Most conifers; including fir (Abies), larch (Larix), spruce (Picea), pine (Pinus), hemlock (Tsuga) and Douglas Fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii). Range
Transcontinental in both Eurasia (ssp. signaria) and North America (ssp. dispuncta). In North America found across the boreal forest and mountains in Canada from Newfoundland and Labrador to Vancouver Island and the…
Transcontinental in both Eurasia (ssp. signaria) and North America (ssp. dispuncta). In North America found across the boreal forest and mountains in Canada from Newfoundland and Labrador to Vancouver Island and the Queen Charlottes; south in the east to Georgia and Alabama. In Alberta found wherever native conifers are present.

Citation

Page Citation for Macaria signaria

Page Citation

"Macaria signaria, University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum." University of Alberta Museums Search Site, https://search.museums.ualberta.ca/g/2-4917/9-15512. Accessed 19 Sep. 2021.

Taxonomic Hierarchy

Kingdom Animalia Phylum Arthropoda Class Hexapoda Subclass Insecta Order Lepidoptera Suborder Ditrysia Superfamily Geometroidea Family Geometridae Subfamily Ennominae Tribe Semiothisini Genus Macaria Species Macaria signaria
This hierarchy is created from our museum records, it may not always accurately reflect modern taxonomies.

Taxonomic Hierarchy for University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum