Species Details

Clostera strigosa

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum Read more about this collection »

Common NameStriped Chocolate-tip SeasonalityAdults are on the wing in Alberta from late May to early July. IdentificationA medium-size (2.5-3.0 cm wingspan) stubby-winged dusky brown moth with lighter oblique lines crossing the forewings and a straw yellow blotch near the apex. Hindwings the same color as forewings, but unmarked. The antennae are bipectinate and both sexes are similar. Similar to other Clostera species, in particular C. apicalis, but with a more mottled appearance. The pale yellow or gold patch near the apex separates strigosa from other Clostera species.

Scientific Name Clostera strigosa Common Name Striped Chocolate-tip Habitat Poplar and mixedwood forest. Seasonality Adults are on the wing in Alberta from late May to early July. Identification
A medium-size (2.5-3.0 cm wingspan) stubby-winged dusky brown moth with lighter oblique lines crossing the forewings and a straw yellow blotch near the apex. Hindwings the same color as forewings, but unmarked. The…
A medium-size (2.5-3.0 cm wingspan) stubby-winged dusky brown moth with lighter oblique lines crossing the forewings and a straw yellow blotch near the apex. Hindwings the same color as forewings, but unmarked. The antennae are bipectinate and both sexes are similar. Similar to other Clostera species, in particular C. apicalis, but with a more mottled appearance. The pale yellow or gold patch near the apex separates strigosa from other Clostera species.
Life History
There is one annual brood, which emerges in late spring. The adults are nocturnal and come to light. Unlike other members of the genus, strigosa is uncommon and usually only one or two specimens are collected in a season.
There is one annual brood, which emerges in late spring. The adults are nocturnal and come to light. Unlike other members of the genus, strigosa is uncommon and usually only one or two specimens are collected in a season.
Conservation Although suitable habitat and hosts are abundant, this moth appears to be uncommon in Alberta. Diet Info No Alberta data. Elsewhere reported to feed on aspen poplar (Populus tremuloides) (Forbes, 1948). Range From Nova Scotia west across southern Canada to extreme southeastern BC (Wasa), south to Maine and New York. In Alberta found in the southern boreal mixedwood forest and aspen parklands.

Citation

Page Citation for Clostera strigosa

Page Citation

"Species Details - Clostera strigosa, University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum." University of Alberta Museums Search Site, https://search.museums.ualberta.ca/g/2-462. Accessed 13 Aug. 2022.

Taxonomic Hierarchy

Kingdom Animalia Phylum Arthropoda Class Hexapoda Subclass Insecta Order Lepidoptera Suborder Ditrysia Superfamily Noctuoidea Family Notodontidae Genus Clostera Species Clostera strigosa
This hierarchy is created from our museum records, it may not always accurately reflect modern taxonomies.

Taxonomic Hierarchy for University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum