Species Details

Schizura ipomoeae

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum Read more about this collection »

Common NameMorning-glory Prominent SeasonalityAdults in Alberta June-July. IdentificationA medium-size (3.5-4.7 cm. wingspan) moth. Males can be identified as a Notodontid by the characteristic antennae (basal half broadly pectinate, terminal half simple) and the elongate abdomen with a bifurcate tip. Typical form as follows: forewing grey and tan with a broad, diffuse basal dash, and with the costa rather pale, especially as it nears the apex. The lines are fine, scalloped and broken. The reniform is a dark smudge, often with a pale center crossed by a dark bar. The fringe is broadly checkered. The hindwing is white in the male with a dark patch marking the anal angle. Both sexes are similar, but the female has darker hindwings. The moth is highly variable, with a number of described forms.

Scientific Name Schizura ipomoeae Common Name Morning-glory Prominent Seasonality Adults in Alberta June-July. Identification
A medium-size (3.5-4.7 cm. wingspan) moth. Males can be identified as a Notodontid by the characteristic antennae (basal half broadly pectinate, terminal half simple) and the elongate abdomen with a bifurcate tip.…
A medium-size (3.5-4.7 cm. wingspan) moth. Males can be identified as a Notodontid by the characteristic antennae (basal half broadly pectinate, terminal half simple) and the elongate abdomen with a bifurcate tip. Typical form as follows: forewing grey and tan with a broad, diffuse basal dash, and with the costa rather pale, especially as it nears the apex. The lines are fine, scalloped and broken. The reniform is a dark smudge, often with a pale center crossed by a dark bar. The fringe is broadly checkered. The hindwing is white in the male with a dark patch marking the anal angle. Both sexes are similar, but the female has darker hindwings. The moth is highly variable, with a number of described forms.
Life History Adults are diurnal and come to light. The overwintering stage is the pupae. Conservation Rarely collected in Alberta. No concerns. Diet Info No Alberta data available. In Canada, a wide range of deciduous trees and shrubs, including birch (Betula), willows (Salix) and poplars (Populus). (See Prentice et al, 1962 for a list). Range Nova Scotia west to Vancouver Island, south to Florida, Texas and Utah. In Alberta collected only along the Battle River valley, west to Camrose.

Taxonomic Hierarchy

Kingdom Animalia Phylum Arthropoda Class Hexapoda Subclass Insecta Order Lepidoptera Suborder Ditrysia Superfamily Noctuoidea Family Notodontidae Genus Schizura Species Schizura ipomoeae
This hierarchy is created from our museum records, it may not always accurately reflect modern taxonomies.

Taxonomic Hierarchy for University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum