Species Details

Pheosia rimosa

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum Read more about this collection »

Common NameBlack-rimmed Prominent, Fissured Prominent SeasonalityAdults on the wing late May through July, larvae June through September. IdentificationA rather large (4.3-6.2 cm. wingspan) mostly dark black-brown and white moth. The forewing is white with a dark strip along the costa, widening near the apex, and along the entire lower margin. Hindwing white with a dark blotch in the anal angle. Some specimens, especially from the mountains, have most of the white on the forwing replaced with pale brown, and these greatly resemble P. portlandia from coastal BC. The two species are not known to occur together, with portlandia replacing rimosa on Vancouver Island and the lower mainland of BC. Both sexes are similar, but females are bit larger, darker and with a narrower antennae.

Scientific Name Pheosia rimosa Common Name Black-rimmed Prominent, Fissured Prominent Habitat Deciduous and mixedwood forest and shrublands. Seasonality Adults on the wing late May through July, larvae June through September. Identification
A rather large (4.3-6.2 cm. wingspan) mostly dark black-brown and white moth. The forewing is white with a dark strip along the costa, widening near the apex, and along the entire lower margin. Hindwing white with a…
A rather large (4.3-6.2 cm. wingspan) mostly dark black-brown and white moth. The forewing is white with a dark strip along the costa, widening near the apex, and along the entire lower margin. Hindwing white with a dark blotch in the anal angle. Some specimens, especially from the mountains, have most of the white on the forwing replaced with pale brown, and these greatly resemble P. portlandia from coastal BC. The two species are not known to occur together, with portlandia replacing rimosa on Vancouver Island and the lower mainland of BC. Both sexes are similar, but females are bit larger, darker and with a narrower antennae.
Life History
Adults are nocturnal and come to light. Fresh adults may be taken late in the season, indicating a very extended emergence, or more likely at least a partial second generation per year. Overwinters as a pupa. The…
Adults are nocturnal and come to light. Fresh adults may be taken late in the season, indicating a very extended emergence, or more likely at least a partial second generation per year. Overwinters as a pupa. The larvae are solitary defoliators of deciduous trees. They have an anal horn and resemble small sphinx larvae.
Conservation A common, widespread species. No concerns. Diet Info No specific Alberta data. Elsewhere in Canada, poplars (especially aspen poplar) and willows (Populus and Salix). Range
Transcontinental across southern Canada, except for the lower mainland of BC and Vancouver Island, south to North Carolina, Nebraska and California. In Alberta, occurs throughout the aspen parklands, the foothills and…
Transcontinental across southern Canada, except for the lower mainland of BC and Vancouver Island, south to North Carolina, Nebraska and California. In Alberta, occurs throughout the aspen parklands, the foothills and mountains and the boreal forest north to at least the Ft. McMurray and northern Peace River areas. There are a number of closely related species in the Palearctic region.

Citation

Page Citation for Pheosia rimosa

Page Citation

"Pheosia rimosa, University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum." University of Alberta Museums Search Site, https://search.museums.ualberta.ca/g/2-458. Accessed 19 Sep. 2021.

Taxonomic Hierarchy

Kingdom Animalia Phylum Arthropoda Class Hexapoda Subclass Insecta Order Lepidoptera Suborder Ditrysia Superfamily Noctuoidea Family Notodontidae Genus Pheosia Species Pheosia rimosa
This hierarchy is created from our museum records, it may not always accurately reflect modern taxonomies.

Taxonomic Hierarchy for University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum