Species Details

Nepytia freemani

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum Read more about this collection »

Common NameWestern False Hemlock Looper SeasonalityAdults emerge in autumn and fly from August to October (McGuffin 1987 IdentificationWings grey-white, heavily dusted with dark grey, median area slightly darker and bordered with scalloped, prominent AM and PM lines. Discal spots large. Slightly darker and smaller than Cingilia caternaria. N. freemani lacks the yellow scales at the top of the head of N. canosaria; the ranges of the two do not overlap, with freemani strictly a foothills/mountain species in Alberta.

Scientific Name Nepytia freemani Common Name Western False Hemlock Looper Habitat Montane coniferous forest. Seasonality Adults emerge in autumn and fly from August to October (McGuffin 1987 Identification
Wings grey-white, heavily dusted with dark grey, median area slightly darker and bordered with scalloped, prominent AM and PM lines. Discal spots large. Slightly darker and smaller than Cingilia caternaria. N.…
Wings grey-white, heavily dusted with dark grey, median area slightly darker and bordered with scalloped, prominent AM and PM lines. Discal spots large. Slightly darker and smaller than Cingilia caternaria. N. freemani lacks the yellow scales at the top of the head of N. canosaria; the ranges of the two do not overlap, with freemani strictly a foothills/mountain species in Alberta.
Life History
The larvae are tan and rust coloured, with cream lateral stripes; they are occasionally abundant enough to cause visible defoliation of conifers in BC (Duncan 2003). Eggs are laid singly or in small groups on the host…
The larvae are tan and rust coloured, with cream lateral stripes; they are occasionally abundant enough to cause visible defoliation of conifers in BC (Duncan 2003). Eggs are laid singly or in small groups on the host needles, where they overwinter. Larvae are illustrated in Ives & Wong (1988) and Duncan (2003), and all immature stages are illustrated by Klein and Minnoch (1971). Adults are nocturnal.
Conservation Not of concern. Diet Info The principal larval host is Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii), rarely other conifers (McGuffin 1987). Range Southern BC and extreme southwestern Alberta south to WA, ID, MT and UT (McGuffin 1987, Duncan 2003).

Citation

Page Citation for Nepytia freemani

Page Citation

"Nepytia freemani, University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum." University of Alberta Museums Search Site, https://search.museums.ualberta.ca/g/2-4463. Accessed 21 Jan. 2022.

Taxonomic Hierarchy

Kingdom Animalia Phylum Arthropoda Class Hexapoda Subclass Insecta Order Lepidoptera Suborder Ditrysia Superfamily Geometroidea Family Geometridae Subfamily Ennominae Tribe Ourapterygini Genus Nepytia Species Nepytia freemani
This hierarchy is created from our museum records, it may not always accurately reflect modern taxonomies.

Taxonomic Hierarchy for University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum