Species Details

Lycia ursaria

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum Read more about this collection »

Common NameThe Bear SeasonalityAn early spring flier, peaking in late April to late May. IdentificationFor a geometrid, this species has an unusually stout and hairy body (hence the name), and together with the elongate wing shape, it is more reminiscent of a species of Gluphisia (Notodontidae); however, it lacks the tan scales of Gluphisia. More uniformly grey overall than Biston betularia, with less contrasting transverse black lines. Lycia rachelae is not mottled, and has orange-brown scales along the forewing costa (absent in ursaria). Female fully winged, but apparently collected only rarely.

Scientific Name Lycia ursaria Common Name The Bear Seasonality An early spring flier, peaking in late April to late May. Identification
For a geometrid, this species has an unusually stout and hairy body (hence the name), and together with the elongate wing shape, it is more reminiscent of a species of Gluphisia (Notodontidae); however, it lacks the…
For a geometrid, this species has an unusually stout and hairy body (hence the name), and together with the elongate wing shape, it is more reminiscent of a species of Gluphisia (Notodontidae); however, it lacks the tan scales of Gluphisia. More uniformly grey overall than Biston betularia, with less contrasting transverse black lines. Lycia rachelae is not mottled, and has orange-brown scales along the forewing costa (absent in ursaria). Female fully winged, but apparently collected only rarely.
Life History
The eggs are laid in clusters of 150 to 200 in early spring before bud break, and hatch in about three weeks. The purplish-brown larvae are twig mimics, and develop slowly throughout the spring and summer, not…
The eggs are laid in clusters of 150 to 200 in early spring before bud break, and hatch in about three weeks. The purplish-brown larvae are twig mimics, and develop slowly throughout the spring and summer, not pupating until mid July to early August (Prentice 1963, McGuffin 1977, Wagner et al. 2001). Adults come to light. This is one of the first species to emerge in the spring, along with Feralia, Orthosia and Gluphisia species.
Conservation Not of concern. Diet Info
Larvae feed on a variety of deciduous trees and shrubs such as dogwood (Cornus stolonifera), white birch (Betula papyrifera), willows (Salix spp.), alders (Alnus spp.), Vaccinium spp. and Prunus spp. (McGuffin 1977).
Larvae feed on a variety of deciduous trees and shrubs such as dogwood (Cornus stolonifera), white birch (Betula papyrifera), willows (Salix spp.), alders (Alnus spp.), Vaccinium spp. and Prunus spp. (McGuffin 1977).
Range Across southern Canada, from northern Alberta south to New Brunswick, Colorado and Washington (McGuffin 1977).

Citation

Page Citation for Lycia ursaria

Page Citation

"Lycia ursaria, University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum." University of Alberta Museums Search Site, https://search.museums.ualberta.ca/g/2-4298. Accessed 23 Jul. 2021.

Taxonomic Hierarchy

Kingdom Animalia Phylum Arthropoda Class Hexapoda Subclass Insecta Order Lepidoptera Suborder Ditrysia Superfamily Geometroidea Family Geometridae Subfamily Ennominae Tribe Bistonini Genus Lycia Species Lycia ursaria
This hierarchy is created from our museum records, it may not always accurately reflect modern taxonomies.

Taxonomic Hierarchy for University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum