Species Details

Euchlaena marginaria

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum Read more about this collection »

Common NameOchre Euchlaena SeasonalityIn Alberta adults fly from May to July, peaking from late May to mid June. IdentificationA relatively pale, large Euchlaena. AM and PM lines more diiffuse than E. madusaria, black discal spots small but well defined. Outer third of forewing often contrasting and and slightly darker. Similar to E. tigrinaria, but lacks the black patches in the subterminal area of the wings. In eastern North America, the outer third of the wing is much darker than in western specimens; the western forms were described as Euchlaena albertanensis (Swett) but McGuffin (1981) considers these forms of marginaria. To complicate matters, Wagner et al. (2001) state that Canadian and northern US populations which have gone under the name marginaria may be a separate species from the douple-brooded marginaria of the southeastern US.

Scientific Name Euchlaena marginaria Common Name Ochre Euchlaena Habitat Mixedwood and deciduous boreal forest. Seasonality In Alberta adults fly from May to July, peaking from late May to mid June. Identification
A relatively pale, large Euchlaena. AM and PM lines more diiffuse than E. madusaria, black discal spots small but well defined. Outer third of forewing often contrasting and and slightly darker. Similar to E.…
A relatively pale, large Euchlaena. AM and PM lines more diiffuse than E. madusaria, black discal spots small but well defined. Outer third of forewing often contrasting and and slightly darker. Similar to E. tigrinaria, but lacks the black patches in the subterminal area of the wings. In eastern North America, the outer third of the wing is much darker than in western specimens; the western forms were described as Euchlaena albertanensis (Swett) but McGuffin (1981) considers these forms of marginaria. To complicate matters, Wagner et al. (2001) state that Canadian and northern US populations which have gone under the name marginaria may be a separate species from the douple-brooded marginaria of the southeastern US.
Life History
The adults are nocturnal and are attracted to lights. The dark brown, mottled larva is a twig mimic, complete with two wart-like dorsal projections at the base of the abdomen (Wagner et al 2001). Ives & Wong (1988)…
The adults are nocturnal and are attracted to lights. The dark brown, mottled larva is a twig mimic, complete with two wart-like dorsal projections at the base of the abdomen (Wagner et al 2001). Ives & Wong (1988) also illustrate the larva.
Conservation Not of concern Diet Info The larvae feed on alder (Alnus sp.), white birch (Betula papyrifera) and willow (Salix sp.) in western Canada (Prentice 1963). Range Southern interior BC east to Nova Scotia, south to FL, KY, MO and ID (McGuffin 1981, Wagner et al. 2001).

Citation

Page Citation for Euchlaena marginaria

Page Citation

"Species Details - Euchlaena marginaria, University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum." University of Alberta Museums Search Site, https://search.museums.ualberta.ca/g/2-4201. Accessed 26 Sep. 2022.

Taxonomic Hierarchy

Kingdom Animalia Phylum Arthropoda Class Hexapoda Subclass Insecta Order Lepidoptera Suborder Ditrysia Superfamily Geometroidea Family Geometridae Subfamily Ennominae Tribe Angeronini Genus Euchlaena Species Euchlaena marginaria
This hierarchy is created from our museum records, it may not always accurately reflect modern taxonomies.

Taxonomic Hierarchy for University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum