Species Details

Ematurga amitaria

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum Read more about this collection »

Common NameCranberry Spanworm SeasonalityIn Alberta adults are present mid May to late June. IdentificationA medium-sized, rust brown and orange day-flying geometrid; large plumose antennae will separate amitaria from look-alikes: Scopula sentinaria is smaller, has less prominently pectinate antennae and flies later in the year.

Scientific Name Ematurga amitaria Common Name Cranberry Spanworm Habitat Boreal peat bogs. Seasonality In Alberta adults are present mid May to late June. Identification
A medium-sized, rust brown and orange day-flying geometrid; large plumose antennae will separate amitaria from look-alikes: Scopula sentinaria is smaller, has less prominently pectinate antennae and flies later in the year.
A medium-sized, rust brown and orange day-flying geometrid; large plumose antennae will separate amitaria from look-alikes: Scopula sentinaria is smaller, has less prominently pectinate antennae and flies later in the year.
Life History
The immature stages are described in detail by McGuffin (1977). As the common name suggests, this species is sometimes a pest of cranberry crops and other heaths in eastern North America. Eggs hatch in about ten days,…
The immature stages are described in detail by McGuffin (1977). As the common name suggests, this species is sometimes a pest of cranberry crops and other heaths in eastern North America. Eggs hatch in about ten days, and the larval period lasts 34 to 43 days. Pupae overwinter among debris on the ground (Franklin in McGuffin 1977). Usually found only in peat bogs
Conservation Few records for Alberta; more survey work is needed, but not likely to be of concern. Diet Info
Larvae feed primarily on heaths such as Ledum, Vaccinium, Rhododendron, Kalmia, Chamaedaphne, and occasionally on rosaceous plants such as Spiraea and Rubus (Ferguson 1955, McGuffin 1977). Host plant use in Alberta…
Larvae feed primarily on heaths such as Ledum, Vaccinium, Rhododendron, Kalmia, Chamaedaphne, and occasionally on rosaceous plants such as Spiraea and Rubus (Ferguson 1955, McGuffin 1977). Host plant use in Alberta has not been documented
Range Nova Scotia to west-central Alberta, south to Pennsylvania and Wisconsin (McGuffin 1977).

Citation

Page Citation for Ematurga amitaria

Page Citation

"Ematurga amitaria, University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum." University of Alberta Museums Search Site, https://search.museums.ualberta.ca/g/2-4191. Accessed 27 Oct. 2021.

Taxonomic Hierarchy

Kingdom Animalia Phylum Arthropoda Class Hexapoda Subclass Insecta Order Lepidoptera Suborder Ditrysia Superfamily Geometroidea Family Geometridae Subfamily Ennominae Tribe Boarmiini Genus Ematurga Species Ematurga amitaria
This hierarchy is created from our museum records, it may not always accurately reflect modern taxonomies.

Taxonomic Hierarchy for University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum