Species Details

Dysstroma citrata

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum Read more about this collection »

Common NameDark Marbled Carpet SeasonalityIn Alberta the peak flight is from late July to mid August. IdentificationThis group of Dysstroma, consisting of D. citrata, suspectata, walkerata,and truncata, form a complex of species which are often difficult to distinguish without resorting to genitalic characters. D. citrata is usually the most common of the four, and generally flies later in the summer. It is smaller than walkerata, has a paler hindwing than suspectata, and poorly-defined, whitewashed forewing compared to truncata. The brown AM patch at the anal FW margin does not have a well-defined, round border as it does in truncata. The female genitalia are illustrated by McDunnough (1946), which are characterised by a distinctively large appendix bursa.

Scientific Name Dysstroma citrata Common Name Dark Marbled Carpet Habitat Mesic deciduous and mixedwood forests and woodlands. Seasonality In Alberta the peak flight is from late July to mid August. Identification
This group of Dysstroma, consisting of D. citrata, suspectata, walkerata,and truncata, form a complex of species which are often difficult to distinguish without resorting to genitalic characters. D. citrata is…
This group of Dysstroma, consisting of D. citrata, suspectata, walkerata,and truncata, form a complex of species which are often difficult to distinguish without resorting to genitalic characters. D. citrata is usually the most common of the four, and generally flies later in the summer. It is smaller than walkerata, has a paler hindwing than suspectata, and poorly-defined, whitewashed forewing compared to truncata. The brown AM patch at the anal FW margin does not have a well-defined, round border as it does in truncata. The female genitalia are illustrated by McDunnough (1946), which are characterised by a distinctively large appendix bursa.
Life History
The larva is pale green with faint stripes, rolling its head under the thorax when disturbed; it rests in the typical geometrid pose, with the anterior part of the body raised at an angle above the substrate. The egg…
The larva is pale green with faint stripes, rolling its head under the thorax when disturbed; it rests in the typical geometrid pose, with the anterior part of the body raised at an angle above the substrate. The egg overwinters, unlike truncata which overwinters as a mature larva and consequently appears earlier in the spring (Wagner et al. 2001). Adults come to light and also sugar bait (Ferguson 1954). The larva is pale green with faint stripes, rolling its head under the thorax when disturbed; it rests in the typical geometrid pose, with the anterior part of the body raised at an angle above the substrate. The egg overwinters, unlike truncata which overwinters as a mature larva and consequently appears earlier in the spring (Wagner et al. 2001). Adults come to light and also sugar bait (Ferguson 1954). The larva is pale green with faint stripes, rolling its head under the thorax when disturbed; it rests in the typical geometrid pose, with the anterior part of the body raised at an angle above the substrate. The egg overwinters, unlike truncata which overwinters as a mature larva and consequently appears earlier in the spring (Wagner et al. 2001). Adults come to light and also sugar bait (Ferguson 1954).
Conservation Not of concern. Diet Info
A variety of deciduous shrubs, especially alder (Alnus) and willow (Salix); also on western hemlock in B.C. (Prentice 1963). Larvae of this genus and other larentiines usually feed on herbaceous plants, for which…
A variety of deciduous shrubs, especially alder (Alnus) and willow (Salix); also on western hemlock in B.C. (Prentice 1963). Larvae of this genus and other larentiines usually feed on herbaceous plants, for which specific host plant records are rare; the use of herbaceous plants by D. citrata may therefore be more widespread than the current records indicate.
Range temperate Eurasia. In North America, found south to northern New England and across southern Canada; southern range limit in the west uncertain and the Pacific Northwest uncertain. (Forbes 1948, Wagner et al. 2001).

Citation

Page Citation for Dysstroma citrata

Page Citation

"Dysstroma citrata, University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum." University of Alberta Museums Search Site, https://search.museums.ualberta.ca/g/2-4112. Accessed 19 Sep. 2021.

Taxonomic Hierarchy

Kingdom Animalia Phylum Arthropoda Class Hexapoda Subclass Insecta Order Lepidoptera Suborder Ditrysia Superfamily Geometroidea Family Geometridae Subfamily Larentiinae Tribe Hydriomenini Genus Dysstroma Species Dysstroma citrata
This hierarchy is created from our museum records, it may not always accurately reflect modern taxonomies.

Taxonomic Hierarchy for University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum