Species Details

Besma quercivoraria

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum Read more about this collection »

Common NameOak Besma SeasonalityLate May to early July peaking in mid June. IdentificationA thin-winged and finely marked geometrid. Ground colour pale tan, with a fine, straight PM line (sometimes absent on hindwing) and a scalloped (sometimes absent) subterminal line. Tiny black discal spot sometimes present on both. Fore and hindwings are characterized by a well-defined pointed projection mid-way along the margin. Lambdina fiscellaria is similar, but lacks the scalloped subterminal line (often more clearly visible on the underside), and flies in the fall. Virtually identical to B. endropiaria in colour and pattern; according to Forbes (1948), endropiaria has translucent rather than opaque wings and lacks the discal spot. B. endropiariaB. quercivoraria are treated as the same species by McGuffin (1987) since there are no apparent morphological differences. In eastern North America there are however differences in broodedness, quercivoraria producing two annual broods and endropiaria one (Wagner et al. 2001).

Scientific Name Besma quercivoraria Common Name Oak Besma Seasonality Late May to early July peaking in mid June. Identification
A thin-winged and finely marked geometrid. Ground colour pale tan, with a fine, straight PM line (sometimes absent on hindwing) and a scalloped (sometimes absent) subterminal line. Tiny black discal spot sometimes…
A thin-winged and finely marked geometrid. Ground colour pale tan, with a fine, straight PM line (sometimes absent on hindwing) and a scalloped (sometimes absent) subterminal line. Tiny black discal spot sometimes present on both. Fore and hindwings are characterized by a well-defined pointed projection mid-way along the margin. Lambdina fiscellaria is similar, but lacks the scalloped subterminal line (often more clearly visible on the underside), and flies in the fall. Virtually identical to B. endropiaria in colour and pattern; according to Forbes (1948), endropiaria has translucent rather than opaque wings and lacks the discal spot. B. endropiariaB. quercivoraria are treated as the same species by McGuffin (1987) since there are no apparent morphological differences. In eastern North America there are however differences in broodedness, quercivoraria producing two annual broods and endropiaria one (Wagner et al. 2001).
Life History
The larvae are cryptic, and resemble twigs in colouration and texture. The pupa overwinters, and adults are nocturnal and come to light (Wagner et al. 2001). An uncommon moth in Alberta, usually only encountered in…
The larvae are cryptic, and resemble twigs in colouration and texture. The pupa overwinters, and adults are nocturnal and come to light (Wagner et al. 2001). An uncommon moth in Alberta, usually only encountered in low numbers.
Conservation Not of concern. Diet Info Prentice (1963) reports the vast majority of larval collections in southern Canada from white birch (Betula papyrifera). Range BC to Newfoundland, south to Fl and TX (McGuffin 1987).

Citation

Page Citation for Besma quercivoraria

Page Citation

"Besma quercivoraria, University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum." University of Alberta Museums Search Site, https://search.museums.ualberta.ca/g/2-3977. Accessed 23 Jul. 2021.

Taxonomic Hierarchy

Kingdom Animalia Phylum Arthropoda Class Hexapoda Subclass Insecta Order Lepidoptera Suborder Ditrysia Superfamily Geometroidea Family Geometridae Subfamily Ennominae Tribe Ourapterygini Genus Besma Species Besma quercivoraria
This hierarchy is created from our museum records, it may not always accurately reflect modern taxonomies.

Taxonomic Hierarchy for University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum