Species Details

Anavitrinella pampinaria

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum Read more about this collection »

Common NameCommon Gray SeasonalityThe only Alberta record is for July 8. Flies from June to August elsewhere. IdentificationSuperficially similar to other Grays (Stenoporpia, Anacamptodes, Iridopsis, Ectropis, Protoboarmia), but the contrasting pale band at the base of the abdomen, flanked distally by two black streaks, is unique to A. pampinaria.

Scientific Name Anavitrinella pampinaria Common Name Common Gray Habitat Unknown in Alberta; likely open deciduous forest and shrubby areas. Seasonality The only Alberta record is for July 8. Flies from June to August elsewhere. Identification
Superficially similar to other Grays (Stenoporpia, Anacamptodes, Iridopsis, Ectropis, Protoboarmia), but the contrasting pale band at the base of the abdomen, flanked distally by two black streaks, is unique to A. pampinaria.
Superficially similar to other Grays (Stenoporpia, Anacamptodes, Iridopsis, Ectropis, Protoboarmia), but the contrasting pale band at the base of the abdomen, flanked distally by two black streaks, is unique to A. pampinaria.
Life History
The egg is laid singly on the host leaf underside, and hatches in about seven days. Larvae are twig mimics and go through 5 instars, pupating underground in the fall to emerge the following summer (McGuffin 1977). The…
The egg is laid singly on the host leaf underside, and hatches in about seven days. Larvae are twig mimics and go through 5 instars, pupating underground in the fall to emerge the following summer (McGuffin 1977). The immature stages are described in detail by McGuffin (1977) and the mature larva is illustrated by Wagner et al. (2001).
Conservation The only Alberta record is a specimen collected in 1942. Common and widespread elsewhere. Diet Info
Larvae feed on an incredible variety of deciduous and coniferous trees and shrubs. Larvae were most often collected on Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga), Buffaloberry (Shepherdia), Yellow Birch (Betula) and willows (Salix) by…
Larvae feed on an incredible variety of deciduous and coniferous trees and shrubs. Larvae were most often collected on Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga), Buffaloberry (Shepherdia), Yellow Birch (Betula) and willows (Salix) by the Forest Insect Survey (Prentice 1963).
Range
Widespread throughout southern Canada and the continental US south to Mexico (McGuffin 1977). Although this species is present in eastern Canada and throughout southern BC, it is apparently absent from most of central…
Widespread throughout southern Canada and the continental US south to Mexico (McGuffin 1977). Although this species is present in eastern Canada and throughout southern BC, it is apparently absent from most of central and southern Alberta, despite its wide host range.

Citation

Page Citation for Anavitrinella pampinaria

Page Citation

"Anavitrinella pampinaria, University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum." University of Alberta Museums Search Site, https://search.museums.ualberta.ca/g/2-3951. Accessed 27 Oct. 2021.

Taxonomic Hierarchy

Kingdom Animalia Phylum Arthropoda Class Hexapoda Subclass Insecta Order Lepidoptera Suborder Ditrysia Superfamily Geometroidea Family Geometridae Subfamily Ennominae Tribe Boarmiini Genus Anavitrinella Species Anavitrinella pampinaria
This hierarchy is created from our museum records, it may not always accurately reflect modern taxonomies.

Taxonomic Hierarchy for University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum