Species Details

Plagodis pulveraria

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum Read more about this collection »

Common NameAmerican Barred Umber SeasonalityPeak flight activity in Alberta is mid May through mid June. IdentificationA mid-sized geometrid, ground colour tan heavily speckled with red-brown and a broad dark red-brown forewing median band with a straight AM border and an irregular PM border. Hindwing with dark PM line, heaviest at the anal margin. No other Alberta geometrid has a broad, evenly coloured median band like that of P. pulveraria.

Scientific Name Plagodis pulveraria Common Name American Barred Umber Habitat Deciduous and mixedwood forest and woodlands. Seasonality Peak flight activity in Alberta is mid May through mid June. Identification
A mid-sized geometrid, ground colour tan heavily speckled with red-brown and a broad dark red-brown forewing median band with a straight AM border and an irregular PM border. Hindwing with dark PM line, heaviest at…
A mid-sized geometrid, ground colour tan heavily speckled with red-brown and a broad dark red-brown forewing median band with a straight AM border and an irregular PM border. Hindwing with dark PM line, heaviest at the anal margin. No other Alberta geometrid has a broad, evenly coloured median band like that of P. pulveraria.
Life History
Adults are active both during the day and at night, and come to lights. A fairly common moth in the central boreal region of the province. The larvae are twig mimics, and pupate prior to winter among leaves tied…
Adults are active both during the day and at night, and come to lights. A fairly common moth in the central boreal region of the province. The larvae are twig mimics, and pupate prior to winter among leaves tied together with silk (McGuffin 1987).
Conservation Not of concern. Diet Info
Larvae are generalists on deciduous and coniferous trees and shrubs, perhaps with a preference for the rose family; reported hosts include saskatoon (Amelanchier), choke cherry (Prunus), raspberry (Rubus), shrubby…
Larvae are generalists on deciduous and coniferous trees and shrubs, perhaps with a preference for the rose family; reported hosts include saskatoon (Amelanchier), choke cherry (Prunus), raspberry (Rubus), shrubby cinquefoil (Potentilla), paper birch (Betula), alder (Alnus), willows (Salix), white spruce (Picea) and Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga).
Range Coastal BC east to Newfoundland, and from Ft. Smith, NWT south to CA, SD and GA (McGuffin 1987, Wagner et al. 2001).

Citation

Page Citation for Plagodis pulveraria

Page Citation

"Species Details - Plagodis pulveraria, University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum." University of Alberta Museums Search Site, https://search.museums.ualberta.ca/g/2-3950. Accessed 11 Aug. 2022.

Taxonomic Hierarchy

Kingdom Animalia Phylum Arthropoda Class Hexapoda Subclass Insecta Order Lepidoptera Suborder Ditrysia Superfamily Geometroidea Family Geometridae Subfamily Ennominae Tribe Anagogini Genus Plagodis Species Plagodis pulveraria
This hierarchy is created from our museum records, it may not always accurately reflect modern taxonomies.

Taxonomic Hierarchy for University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum