Species Details

Caenurgina crassiuscula

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum Read more about this collection »

Common NameClover Looper, Range Grass-moth SeasonalityAdults are on the wing in Alberta from early May through mid September. IdentificationA medium-size (3-3.2 cm wingspan) brownish grey (male) or brown (female) moth active both during the day and night. The forewing of the male is crossed by two the antemedian one running obliquely to the lower wing margin and touching or almost touching the vertical postmedian band near the lower margin. Crassiuscula is smaller (particularly the small spring brood specimens formerly treated as sp. distincta) and less "crisply" marked than the similar C. erechtea. The female is brown, is a bit larger and has more diffuse marking than does the male. Some larger male specimens may be very difficult to separate from C. erechtea, but these can be identified by checking the genitalia, which differ greatly in the two species.

Scientific Name Caenurgina crassiuscula Common Name Clover Looper, Range Grass-moth Habitat Roadsides, old fields, pastures, meadows and other open grassy areas. Seasonality Adults are on the wing in Alberta from early May through mid September. Identification
A medium-size (3-3.2 cm wingspan) brownish grey (male) or brown (female) moth active both during the day and night. The forewing of the male is crossed by two the antemedian one running obliquely to the lower wing…
A medium-size (3-3.2 cm wingspan) brownish grey (male) or brown (female) moth active both during the day and night. The forewing of the male is crossed by two the antemedian one running obliquely to the lower wing margin and touching or almost touching the vertical postmedian band near the lower margin. Crassiuscula is smaller (particularly the small spring brood specimens formerly treated as sp. distincta) and less "crisply" marked than the similar C. erechtea. The female is brown, is a bit larger and has more diffuse marking than does the male. Some larger male specimens may be very difficult to separate from C. erechtea, but these can be identified by checking the genitalia, which differ greatly in the two species.
Life History This moth is somewhat unusual in that it is active both during the day and at night. There are two or more broods per year, with an early brood of smaller adults appearing in May. Conservation A common, widespread species; no concerns. Diet Info No Alberta data. Elsewhere the larvae are reported to eat grasses (Gramineae) (Rockburne and Lafontaine, 1976), clover (Trifolium), lupines (Lupinus) , and grasses (Covell, 1984). Range Found throughout most of the USA and Canada; in Canada from the maritimes west to BC and north to James Bay and Yukon. Throughout most of Alberta, from the Milk River to the Caribou Mountains.

Citation

Page Citation for Caenurgina crassiuscula

Page Citation

"Caenurgina crassiuscula, University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum." University of Alberta Museums Search Site, https://search.museums.ualberta.ca/g/2-3714. Accessed 27 Oct. 2021.

Taxonomic Hierarchy

Kingdom Animalia Phylum Arthropoda Class Hexapoda Subclass Insecta Order Lepidoptera Suborder Ditrysia Superfamily Noctuoidea Family Noctuidae Subfamily Catocalinae Genus Caenurgina Species Caenurgina crassiuscula
This hierarchy is created from our museum records, it may not always accurately reflect modern taxonomies.

Taxonomic Hierarchy for University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum